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Second World War

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The second Big Scheme of the Twentieth Century

The second part of the 'World War' series. Unusually for a sequel, World War Two was actually an even greater success than World War One. This success may in part have been due to the bigger cast (including many well-known names), more exotic locations, and utterly blinding special effects (including, for the first time the live firing of not one, but two nucular weapons!).

Arguably started by Lt A D Wintle MC, 1 RDG when he wrote in his diary, "19th November: Great War Peace signed. 20th November: Wintle declares war on Germany." A man, clearly, ahead of his time. (Ahead of his time in comparison to others in Britain perhaps, but on exactly the same wavelength as many contemporary Germans.) See here for details of 'The Stab-in-the-Back Legend: [1]

By the time the rest of the country caught up in 1939, the Army had, as usual, been run down to the extent that, when deployed, it could only practise, "Retiring to Previously Prepared Positions."

That the PPPs ended up being on the south coast of England should serve as a warning to those who come out with such grandiose thinking as "Options for Change."

The British were involved in many Battles and Campaigns:

After the usual calamitous period (4-6 years) and a prodigious 'butchers bill', the world emerged, in 1945, with new political and philosophical boundaries. These are still being modified. On the plus side, it meant the British Army had some cracking postings in North West Europe for a time.

By the way, the Americans didn't 'save' Britain's 'ass' in WW2. Like always they were the last in and first out. They did wave some flags a bit and talk very loudly though. Also dropped two atomic bombs on Japan. Unlike Hollywood revisionist films, the British (with some help from the Poles, Czechs and a few colonial types) won the Battle of Britain. In the D Day landings everyone took a hammering - especially the Canadians - who no one ever mentions. And the Enigma machine was captured and deciphered by Brits not Matthew McHonahey and some good ol' American boys!