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Wayne Gouveia

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Wayne Gouveia worked in a whisky store across the road from a jewellers where his girlfriend Leanne McCarthy worked. They had first met In September 2007 with Gouveia claiming to be an undercover cop.

Gouveia showered Miss McCarthy with expensive gifts and managed to duped his girlfriend into believing he was an MI5 secret agent that had been planted there to watch her boss who was a secret villain and save her life.

This MI5 walt told his lover that her boss was planning an armed robbery to steal precious gems including diamonds as part of an insurance scam and his job was to monitor her work place whilst undercover.

McCarthy believed every word he said, and was even signed up to become a fellow Spy, she accompanied him on fake stake-outs of homes and when he told her his boss wanted her to join MI5, she signed the Official Secrets Act and joined him on “stake-outs” at houses and “covert operations” following cars.

Gouveia managed to totally convinced her that her totally innocent boss planned to poison her with deadly anthrax powder and said he had responsibility to intercept all her post to make sure she was not murdered. Whilst intercepting her post he was taking credit cards and pin numbers from her post.

A terrified McCarthy was tricked into thinking spores from the deadly anthrax chemical could be in her letters.

At his trial at Oxford Crown Court (18 Feb 2009) Judge Maher branded Gouveia “bonkers” and said his actions were “bizarre to the point of lunacy” and warned him he faced jail for stealing nearly £14,000 in total from her. On adjourning sentencing for psychiatric reports, Judge Terence Maher said: ”He spun a web of lies and abused the trust that this unfortunate young woman put in him".

“It is not only a remarkable story but bizarre to the point of lunacy. This man was living in fantasy land and the more I heard, the more I was thinking this man was bonkers”.

Gouevier of Bicester, Oxon, admitted three charges of fraud by false representation.