Zimbabwe is where we should be.

#1
I put it to all ARRSE members that we would be far better off getting out of all places Arabian and heading off to some good old fasioned colonial wars. Zimbabwe is in dire need of help and attention before it implodes. God only knows the general populus would be grateful for our intervention unlike our current commitments.

Any thoughts?
 
#4
DB, thanks for your advice. I take it from your unload that the topic has been done to death?
 
#5
what_no_leave? said:
DB, thanks for your advice. I take it from your unload that the topic has been done to death?
Nothing's ever done to death on ARRSE! These threads are just worth a read-through (use the forum search function to search for more / any other topics you're interested in) and you could always post something to stir up the blood and guts again... :D
 
#8
Why can't we go on operations in Ibiza or the costa del sol? Even Blackpool will do!

A few year ago I was in Belize I think British soldiers were their, unfortunately they were near a Rain forest preserve and not out in the Cayes,where any self respecting occupying force belongs. :)
 
#9
Why should we (you really as I'm 68) go and sort out anybody's problems. Then function of the armed forces is the defence of the realm not to be world policeman. Do you honestly believe that if we did go into Zimbabwe and sorted it out we would get any thanks for it. What planet are you from?
 
#10
We would not be HM Forces any more, we'd be world police wiping the arse of those unable to clean up their own back yard. And what would it cost us to fund all this galavanting across Africa? We are a small island with just 56million inhabitants, many of whom are pulling against the system, not supporting it. The workers will have to work harder that's what. Car tax to BOOM! Oh I know exactly how they'd fund such a 'war'. If we enter any more theatres that having nothing to do with us I'll be emigrating abroad, I'm up to the back teeth with Blair and Co. as it is.
 
#11
It may be correct that we should be in Zimbabwe sorting out the shamefull mess that Mugabe has created, but the fact is that we are stuck in Afghanistan and Iraq for a number of years yet, still have people in the former Yugoslavia, commitments for NI, the Falklands and have a requirement to maintain the training of at least some of the armed forces.... which means that except the proverbial 'Three men and a dog' there's nobody left to send to the former 'bread basket of Africa'. But they ensure us that the forces are in no way overstretched and there is one day going to be a 24 month inter deployment interval.
 
#12
But they ensure us that the forces are in no way overstretched and there is one day going to be a 24 month inter deployment interval.
Sometimes I think promises are made with absolutely no intention of them seeing fruition. It's all lies, lies, lies. Quick fix here, lie and cover up there.
 
#13
what_no_leave? said:
I put it to all ARRSE members that we would be far better off getting out of all places Arabian and heading off to some good old fasioned colonial wars.
Any thoughts?
yes, this is the Other Half Forum, time to move me thinks!
 
#15
craftsmanx said:
Why should we (you really as I'm 68) go and sort out anybody's problems. Then function of the armed forces is the defence of the realm not to be world policeman. Do you honestly believe that if we did go into Zimbabwe and sorted it out we would get any thanks for it. What planet are you from?
The truth is, a lot of people in Zim were British subjects at the time, now are forced around the world, except Britain as our home office has an only Kosovian citizens entrance policy :cry:
 
#16
Unfortunately Rhodesia has no oil. So like many other renegade former Commonwealth countries (eg Burma, NZ) it does not require HM Govt immediate attention.
 
#17
It would be interesting to find out what's become of all the anti Rhodesia/SA protesters who could be found under any flat rock in London. The silence regarding the current sorry state of affairs in those countries is deafening.

Is it possible they're too embarressed to make a noise about the collapse of society under the rule of those they helped into power?
 
#18
Plant-Pilot said:
It may be correct that we should be in Zimbabwe sorting out the shamefull mess that Mugabe has created, but the fact is that we are stuck in Afghanistan and Iraq for a number of years yet, still have people in the former Yugoslavia, commitments for NI, the Falklands and have a requirement to maintain the training of at least some of the armed forces.... which means that except the proverbial 'Three men and a dog' there's nobody left to send to the former 'bread basket of Africa'. But they ensure us that the forces are in no way overstretched and there is one day going to be a 24 month inter deployment interval.
That being the case why doesn't doesn't one of the PMCs join up with industry i.e. de Beers and the tobacco companies, and go to HMG for approval to jointly fund a professional outfit of "recycleds" to do the job for them. It's what happened very succesfully in Angola and Sierra Leone

I, for one, would sign up for that gig.

And Easymoney can come with me if he likes to see the effects of socialism in action! :wink:
 
#19
Sheldrake

SA has a bunch of new anti merc laws that mean anything like that will likely not have local participation. The British military has also notified a number of SAs (around 700) that they would need to quit or take British citizenship now that the laws have been passed. Ain't Marxism great.

I know which one I'd prefer.....
 
#20
From the Sunday Times http://www.sundaytimes.co.za/articles/article.aspx?ID=ST6A200111

SOUTH African police have seized three hijacked cars from senior Zimbabwean goverment officials.

This week, a former Zimbabwean government member of Parliament confirmed that he had been arrested for defeating the ends of justice when two luxury cars — a Mercedes-Benz Kompressor and BMW X5 hijacked in South Africa — were found at his home.

Phillip Chiyangwa, a nephew of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe, confirmed that two associates of his who were “being chased” had asked him to park the vehicles at his home.

However, Chiyangwa, who describes himself as the “Tokyo Sexwale or the Donald Trump of Zimbabwe” denied he knew they were stolen vehicles.

“I have a lot of cars at my house. I can actually donate cars. I’m rich. I don’t need to steal cars from South Africa,” Chiyangwa said this week.

He was earlier accused of “hiding” a third car, a Porsche Cayenne, hijacked from a Sandton businessman. He has since been found not guilty of defeating the ends of justice, a charge that stems from allegedly hiding some of the stolen cars.

He told the Sunday Times that the Porsche was found at the home of a senior Zimbabwean government official, Senator Vivian Mwashita. The Zimbabwean police testified during Chiyangwa’s trial that, when confronted about the whereabouts of the Porsche, he had claimed it was with Mwashita.

Mwashita could not be reached for comment, but Chiyangwa’s lawyer provided affidavits obtained in support of his client’s case.

Police confirmed that several cross-border investigations had resulted in the recovery of at least 14 luxury cars worth around R7-million that were impounded in Zimbabwe and returned to South Africa following a two-week undercover operation involving both countries.

Some of the vehicles had been found with senior government officials.

The traumatised South African hijack victims later travelled to a police pound in Zimbabwe to identify their cars before insurance company representatives drove them back to South Africa to be sold on auction.

Among the cars were a R1.4-million Porsche Cayenne, a Mercedes-Benz E55 AMG V8, a Toyota Prado VX Landcruiser, six BMWs and several other Mercedes-Benz vehicles.

So far no one involved in the Zimbabwe cases has been convicted.

(South African) National Police Commissioner Jackie Selebi denied any knowledge of the involvement of senior Zimbabwean politicians in the purchase or possession of stolen or hijacked South African cars.

Each year, more than 30000 cars stolen or hijacked in South Africa are smuggled across the border and sold in neighbouring countries such as Mozambique, Angola, Zambia, Namibia and Botswana.

According to the Vehicle Security Association of South Africa, highly organised and sophisticated car-theft syndicates operate the estimated R5-billion illegal industry.

The head of the SAPS Organised Crime Unit, Assistant Commissioner Godfrey Lebeya, said police recovered 450 stolen cars this year and 700 last year in cross-border operations.

During a Sunday Times investigation, it also emerged that South African and Zimbabwean police were investigating the possibility that other stolen luxury vehicles, including a Toyota Prado and a Mercedes parked in front of the Zimbabwean parliament, were being driven by Zimbabwean government officials.
 

Similar threads


Latest Threads

Top