Yum! Tastes like deep fried Mars bar!

#3
FFS, stupid cow. They didn't evolve those teeth for eating salad, did they? Going into a cage with big predators is just asking for trouble. Bet she doesn't do it again though.
 
#4
'One minute I was in the enclosure with the cheetahs and the next it was biting at my head.
Really?!
This surprised you?! jesus christ where do they find these people.

Kudos to the husband for actually having the cojones to take pictures of his wife being mauled. I bet he was thinking "Aye, these'll look good in a frame next to her ashes"
Bet he had some serious explaining to do when they got home!
 
#6
The attack lasted around three minutes and her husband captured these shots
nice one, wonder how long he spent sneaking in feeding up the cats with tit-bits slightly sprayed with his wifes perfume?
 
#7
Really?!
This surprised you?! jesus christ where do they find these people.

Kudos to the husband for actually having the cojones to take pictures of his wife being mauled. I bet he was thinking "Aye, these'll look good in a frame next to her ashes"
Bet he had some serious explaining to do when they got home!


Fucking amazing, isn't it?

Oh look, the mrs is getting eaten alive but this will look great on facebook!
 
#9
#11
I like how she said "I never imagined for a moment they would attack an adult."

Yeah, because when you spend your life racing over the veldt at 70mph and eating wildebeest you're going to be really intimidated by a chubby pensioner from Aberdeen, aren't you?
 

Wordsmith

LE
Book Reviewer
#13
The actress Tipi Hedren (of 'The Birds' and 'Marnie' fame) ended up with a ranch in Los Angeles filled with big cats - some of which has the free run of her house! She wrote a book about it.

Lions.jpg

She made some interesting points in the book about interacting with big cats:

- You could largely trust big cats that had been born in captivity. You could not trust ones captured as adults in the wild.

- Even if the big cats had been born in captivity, they're genetically programmed to attack prey that shows signs of weakness. Twisting your ankle then walking in a lion enclosure was not a good idea.

- Its better to interact with them after they've been fed - not before.

I wonder if any of those cases applied to that pensioner.

Wordsmith

As a PS: there are some amazing photos in the book - including the tiger that liked to watch wildlife programs on the television and regularly sat on the sofa to do so.
 
#14
She made some interesting points in the book about interacting with big cats:

- You could largely trust big cats that had been born in captivity. You could not trust ones captured as adults in the wild.

- Even if the big cats had been born in captivity, they're genetically programmed to attack prey that shows signs of weakness. Twisting your ankle then walking in a lion enclosure was not a good idea.

- Its better to interact with them after they've been fed - not before.

I'v owned domestic moggies for decades and one thing you learn about cats, the feckers are not tame, they let you play with them, but when they get bored, they will perfectly hapilly use your hand or leg to sharpen their hunting skills on.
 
#15
The cover pic on the book gives a real idea of the size of a mature male lion , you don't take anything for granted with them as a playful tap of a paw will hapily remove your head from your shoulders.
From the pic at the top of the thread it looks like the Cheetahs were not realy interested in a kill, cheetahs have long been kept as captive pets and are the only cat that can't retract its claws , they are also like dogs in that they don't clean themselves like all the other cats do from your moggy to a lion , much like any domestic dog any animal can turn nasty , I would happily have a cheetah as a domestic animal and would trust it far more than some of the dog breeds commonly kept in the UK
 
Thread starter Similar threads Forum Replies Date
Lancialfa Cookery 6
Stonker The Intelligence Cell 0
Phil306 The NAAFI Bar 18

Similar threads

Latest Threads

Top