Your methods to cope withdepression ?

What treatments, plans, tricks, and methods have you used and found to work for clinical depression ( not just feeling a bit down and having a Jaffa cake to cheer you up depression ) my thoughts are as follows based on 20+ years of experience if it helps anyone.

1. Meds are the first step , without changing your brain chemistry you can't proceed to get better, you have to find the anti depressant that is right for you by trial and error, some have side effects but some don't , some work for a while then you get immune to them and have to change.

2. Eliminate stress, depression is always looking to find a way in when you are stressed out and distracted, its like a vulture that follows you around waiting for you to stumble so it can find a way in. If depression is long term you might need to change your lifestyle, work, and where you live to a low stress , non noisy, non city environment.

3. Are the NHS mental health services actually helping you are they stringing you along to justify their own jobs with endless assessments and bogus promises of treatments that never actually appear ? Ask to see what they are writing about you in their reports. Change your GP as many times as you need to until you find the one that you have confidence in.

4. You are probably ashamed to have depression and feel you have let people who depend on you down, mental illness still has a stigma attached to it but you didn't invent that so you don't have to accept it, depression may just be another physical illness that affects your brain chemistry which you have no control over and are not responsible for, the same as any other medical condition , if you think of it that way it no longer holds any power over you. Stop pretending you are OK when you're not.

5. Acceptance , once you accept that you have depression and stop trying to hide it depression looses its power over you, you can then move on to learning how to keep it in the shadows where it belongs and be in control of your life again, when it comes back you will then have a strategy to let it do its thing while you take the day off and go into survival mode, stay in bed if you want to, sit around in your pants, eat a whole bag of jelly babies ?
Change your life to stop doing the things that cause you stress and anxiety and refuse to get involved in them, instead concentrate on the things that you enjoy that don't trigger your illness. If you had cancer would you feel guilty about stopping work and taking time out to enjoy your life ? Of course not.

6. Are you going to tell everyone that you have depression ? This works both ways, some people need to know and will stick by you but others will avoid you from then on, some people will do the worst thing and try to " cheer you up " when you want to be left alone.

7. Drink and drugs won't help you out of this one, nor will comfort eating, forget about them as a way to cope. Piling on weight will just lower your self confidence even more.

Over to you...
 
I go fishing.
I completely zone out and forget about everything, I have to go at least once a fortnight or I get really snappy and blunt with people if I don't.
 
The one thing that 100% works for me is exercise - getting into the hills for some long walks/hikes.

Avoiding the news can work. It is mainly bad (news) so can reinforce a low.

I am less sure about meds. I have made some major misjudgements while on anti - depressants and, therefore, haven't been on them for some years. I am not saying they don't work for others, but they did me no good at all. Doctors prescribe them too readily imo.
 
I had to go to the GP a few years ago. Within 3 minutes he was trying to get me on tablets.
He didn't expect me to be as blunt as I was in telling him where he could place them.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Exercise can be a blessing a curse. Gives me time to think about things, which can be good or bad.

Self awareness is crucial, once aware of descending the slope, actions can be taken but often you are already sliding down it before you realise that you are even on it.
 
Meds first. I got my doctor to keep trying when the first type didn't work and found one that does.

PT, distance running in the past but now more towards weight training/crossfit-type stuff. Outdoor where possible but I need to keep it up to stay on top of things.

Avoidance of known stressers - in my case, mostly related to certain people and situations.

Change - new challenges always help keep my thoughts from circling the drain. Learning something new, tackling new hobbies, even changing my whole environment, all help.

The first and hardest step was to accept that I wasn't indestructible and that I was really in trouble. The others weren't easy but flowed more naturally once I got one key point into my head - I was not an inexhaustible resource for helping other people out of their problems.
 
Exercise can be a blessing a curse. Gives me time to think about things, which can be good or bad.

Self awareness is crucial, once aware of descending the slope, actions can be taken but often you are already sliding down it before you realise that you are even on it.
Good point. I am better at that than I used to be but it can creep up on you. I sometimes don't realise until I have overreacted to something quite minor.
Telling people about your mood can help but a lot of people don't understand, or think it is a very short term thing and that you will be fine tomorrow.
 
I go fishing.
I completely zone out and forget about everything, I have to go at least once a fortnight or I get really snappy and blunt with people if I don't.
There is absolute truth in this.

8,9,10 hours can pass, and apart from a cup of tea and a piss, your mind is totally focussed on what is going on in your immidiate vicinity and what to do about it.
If you need to get your mind off other things, this works.

Not sure if it would have any effect where chemical imbalance in the brain is involved, but it removes the stresses of life completely, while you are doing it.
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
My biggest hurdle was recognising there was something amiss. I learnt to recognise that every few weeks, something would put me into a downward spiral. Nothing serious other than a reduction in motivation and unwillingness to engage with people. I became good at finding what triggered the depression and it was something that in ordinary life would be inconsequential, so something in me must have reacted. My usual response is to withdraw and do my daily routine without pissing people off. I know that in about two days the lights will come back on and I'll be back to normal. Never gone sick with it or taken meds. It's just part of me and my family accept it because I never make them feel the effects.
 
Once the doc had told me what was wrong, she offered meds on the basis that 'they make the highs less high, the lows less low and the transition between them less sharp'. This was true. I saw the CPN at Brize which was a help in getting things straight and both allowed me to work out the source of the depression. It was a particular situation in my department and, as department head, I was in a position to do something about it which I did.

I'm much more aware of my mood now and can tell if things are starting to push me that way. I have a positive approach to mental health and don't mind talking about it. My take is that I wasn't very well, got treatment and got better. Simple but it worked for me.
 
I go fishing.
I completely zone out and forget about everything, I have to go at least once a fortnight or I get really snappy and blunt with people if I don't.
I use my allotments for the same reason. Some days it's the hard physical graft from doing stuff that is enjoyable, other days it's just sitting staring into space supping tea and enjoying the nature around me.
 
What treatments, plans, tricks, and methods have you used and found to work for clinical depression ( not just feeling a bit down and having a Jaffa cake to cheer you up depression ) my thoughts are as follows based on 20+ years of experience if it helps anyone.

1. Meds are the first step , without changing your brain chemistry you can't proceed to get better, you have to find the anti depressant that is right for you by trial and error, some have side effects but some don't , some work for a while then you get immune to them and have to change.

2. Eliminate stress, depression is always looking to find a way in when you are stressed out and distracted, its like a vulture that follows you around waiting for you to stumble so it can find a way in. If depression is long term you might need to change your lifestyle, work, and where you live to a low stress , non noisy, non city environment.

3. Are the NHS mental health services actually helping you are they stringing you along to justify their own jobs with endless assessments and bogus promises of treatments that never actually appear ? Ask to see what they are writing about you in their reports. Change your GP as many times as you need to until you find the one that you have confidence in.

4. You are probably ashamed to have depression and feel you have let people who depend on you down, mental illness still has a stigma attached to it but you didn't invent that so you don't have to accept it, depression may just be another physical illness that affects your brain chemistry which you have no control over and are not responsible for, the same as any other medical condition , if you think of it that way it no longer holds any power over you. Stop pretending you are OK when you're not.

5. Acceptance , once you accept that you have depression and stop trying to hide it depression looses its power over you, you can then move on to learning how to keep it in the shadows where it belongs and be in control of your life again, when it comes back you will then have a strategy to let it do its thing while you take the day off and go into survival mode, stay in bed if you want to, sit around in your pants, eat a whole bag of jelly babies ?
Change your life to stop doing the things that cause you stress and anxiety and refuse to get involved in them, instead concentrate on the things that you enjoy that don't trigger your illness. If you had cancer would you feel guilty about stopping work and taking time out to enjoy your life ? Of course not.

6. Are you going to tell everyone that you have depression ? This works both ways, some people need to know and will stick by you but others will avoid you from then on, some people will do the worst thing and try to " cheer you up " when you want to be left alone.

7. Drink and drugs won't help you out of this one, nor will comfort eating, forget about them as a way to cope. Piling on weight will just lower your self confidence even more.

Over to you...
Biggest one for me was acceptance & no longer trying to fight it or hide the fact to the wider world. I don’t mean I wear it like a badge, but am much more open about it.

Second was talking, which links from acceptance, been through counselling, which I never thought I would.

Then it’s subtle changes to your lifestyle. Exercise, both gym & my favourite pass time of hill walking for me.

Cutting down the drink has helped as has diet. I eat properly, don’t pick all the time & always look for the healthy option.

Meds help, just need to find the right one.

Finally, support, my wife is rock solid, as has been my sister & close friends. But also a shout out to my GP who has been ace & guided & advised me all the way.

I am from the era of “man up princess”. That was drilled into me from day 1 of basic at 16 & it’s a mantra I’ve always tried to live up to, ultimately to my detriment.
It’s taken time but accepting I wasn’t who I thought I was has made me healthier and I’m told a lot better person to be around.
 
Don’t do stuff you don’t want to do. Work, whatever. Stop it and move on.
True friends are great. Other ********* ain’t your friends.
Focus on the small things. Make a great job of mowing the lawn, or painting a wall. It’s not a ******* big deal, but you want to be able to walk past your painting and think “good job”, not “wish I had done that better”.
Make the tea. Do the ironing. If you feel really bad, thank your partner for their help and support.
Don’t get drunk. Try to sleep. If you can’t sleep, get up and do the crossword or join an online chess game. Never lie in bed thinking.
Have a great GP (most difficult part of all).
And, having had depression all my adult life, you will get over it. It’s shit, but you can learn a lot about yourself, and others. It’s a part of you.
 
Walking the Dog and murder fuçking prostitutes
 

sirbhp

LE
Book Reviewer
I tend to duvet dive and sleep it off . Although that doesn't work if its a long six month depression . My mantra is
this to will pass and it does the same as the good times .
 

Daxx

MIA
Book Reviewer
Clay target shooting.
 

Latest Threads

Top