Your mental health during the Coronavirus crisis

I wholeheartedly get, and support, the need for social distancing, but 'confinement to barracks', for weeks or potentially months, isn't going to do a lot of people's mental state any good, and the 'popping of corks' when eventually lifted could be spectacularly excessive. Does Derbyshire Police not have anything better to do with their toys?

'Derbyshire Police have tweeted a menacing video warning the public to stay away from the Peak District during the coronavirus lockdown. The video shows police drone footage of unsuspecting members of the public hiking, walking their dogs and watching the sunset. All totally harmless behaviour, which is now deemed ‘non-essential’ – and by implication illegal – by the authorities.

'If social distancing must be enforced, it should be enforced with proportion, common sense and empathy. It is not at all clear that the police can be trusted to do this.'


iirc the new rules are that exercising is allowed, so a walk along the road near your home is one thing, but driving up to the Peak District for a picnic is a different matter.
 
iirc the new rules are that exercising is allowed, so a walk along the road near your home is one thing, but driving up to the Peak District for a picnic is a different matter.
I saw an article today which claimed the government have said there are no restrictions on driving for exercise. Seems like lack of consistency is the problem, as to me not driving to go for a walk/exercise makes a lot of sense.
 
iirc the new rules are that exercising is allowed, so a walk along the road near your home is one thing, but driving up to the Peak District for a picnic is a different matter.
I'm not going to get into the toing and froing of this, but it seems from conflicting opinions/interpretations that the UK approach is unclear to some/many.
 
Last edited:
I don't want to sound unsympathetic, but I found this article a bit of a worry. Is it unreasonable to expect just a little resilience from our young?

No, it's perfectly reasonable to expect, and demand, resilience from the young. The problem is an unknown number of people were already suffering varying levels of depression and suicidal ideation before this crisis began - and an unknown number of them below the radar.
An even bigger problem with this, during a 'lockdown' situation, is the support networks are gone. There is nobody keeping an eye on the vulnerable and isolated, there are no means to get face-to-face counselling, and a suicidal person isn't going to trust remote therapy. The depressed and suicidal are left alone with their thoughts.

What we have is a recipe for disaster.

By the way, the snowflake hipster image in that article really doesn't help. The people suffering this the most are the kind of people on the margins of society and struggling to make ends meet.
 
I don't want to sound unsympathetic, but I found this article a bit of a worry. Is it unreasonable to expect just a little resilience from our young?

Expecting resilience is fine. However, the flip side of that is empathy with their situation.

What are the main complaints of adults about the current teens and pre-teens? They spend too much time indoors looking at screens and not enough time getting exercise, fresh air outdoors and social contact with face-to-face interaction. What has now been taken away from them? All the things we kept moaning about them not doing in the first place.

What are the main negative influences on them? Social media, vacuous 'celebrities', reality TV, online gaming and social isolation. Guess what they're being exposed to now more than ever.

Despite what they will claim, deep down they want routine and order. All of that normality has been removed.

They don't have enough background knowledge of the world to be able to critically assess information and identify nonsense automatically. Death for the majority of them will be something alien that only happens to grandad and goldfish. Any number above 10 thousand is roughly equivalent to the younger ones (they know a billion is bigger than a million but have little sense of the scale between them) so projections of 250,000 deaths are mentally translated as "Everyone's going to die!".

I am not making excuses for them - a lot of them are more nervous and show anxiety more than is necessary and building resilience is important. However, just expecting them to 'toughen up' is the mental health equivalent of brufen and tubigrip.

Edit - just re-read the article properly and it's talking about adults. I was sidetracked by the use of 'young people' which where I work is management speak for 'child'. By that stage they should be able to tolerate a couple of weeks indoors and 'toughen up' is definitely appropriate there.
 
Last edited:
I don't want to sound unsympathetic, but I found this article a bit of a worry. Is it unreasonable to expect just a little resilience from our young?

The first generation to have been allowed to do their own thing, whilst simultaneously having everything done for them, and now they can't cope with the merest hint of 'hardship'. Weak, pathetic, self-serving imbeciles.
 
The first generation to have been allowed to do their own thing, whilst simultaneously having everything done for them, and now they can't cope with the merest hint of 'hardship'. Weak, pathetic, self-serving imbeciles.

Generally it's accepted that loneliness kills old people, by leading to conditions such as depression, anxiety etc (as well as causing the same in the young). It's also a driver of anorexia amongst the elderly, because humans generally eat less when on their own - leading to health problems such as malnutrition etc - hence interventions such as lunchtime clubs etc etc.

So are Boomers also weak, pathetic, self-serving imbeciles? Or would it be that isolation affects everyone somewhat negatively, in our socially evolved species?

Edit: Also the person in that article appeared to have a lot of other concerns that I would say are fairly uniformal and drivers of suicide across generations - as seen during recessions and other times of hardship (with this data mainly collected from Boomers).
 
Last edited:
The first generation to have been allowed to do their own thing, whilst simultaneously having everything done for them, and now they can't cope with the merest hint of 'hardship'. Weak, pathetic, self-serving imbeciles.
Well, yes, up to a point, but in some fundamental ways they have it much harder than us.

I grew up in a world that was more carefree, healthier, more liberal, generally much happier and substantially more communitarian.

These days everything is so damn fake, and it's driving young people to attain a standard of living that doesn't exist.
When I was a teenager, I strongly believed that, if I did well in school, I could go to university, sail into a productive career with a large firm, buy a house and raise a traditional family. That pathway is far less certain for a kid growing up today. There is just the anxiety of living day to day, of maintaining the same illusion of affluence that everyone else is.

No, I don't envy young people.
 
During this period of lock down the Mem. and I have had time for those little things which are usually too trivial to be worth the attention. For example, cleaning out the garden sheds, a chore which I have scrupulously avoided for the last seven years. We found things which have been missing since our last move.

Being country folk we have the possibility of bonfires, probably the most therapeutic activity known to man.

As we were unable to receive analog signal, we decided years ago to do without television. Even the iinternet comes in by satellite. Given the white noise in the foreground of many private dwellings, pubs and even hospital waiting rooms I do not regret the decision. Selection is the key with other media.

To the disassembled ranks out there, "Keep b***ering on".
 
Making out like a champ.

lockdown? No different from going off over the horizon for 41/2 months on a tanker in my youth.

Self isolated, food can’t be wasted, washing is the highlight of the week, reading everything you can find, tiding up and cleaning has become a leisure activity, sod all on the telly, and you can look out at the scenery, but can’t go out.
 
I'm very anti social so not having a problem with it at all with the added advantage that now SWMBO doesnt complain when I dobt want to go out.

Quick run to Tesco Yesterday for essentials and that's the only time out since last Tuesday when my company furloughed me for 6 weeks.

I have a stack of books that I have bought and never read, loads of new books on Kindle, new aircraft, terrain packs and missions on DCS and just got an Amazon FireStick so I'm good for 6 weeks no problem!!

SWMBO, 4 cats, 2 rabbits and our 2 autistic kids will keep us busy but right now it's nice telling people to F off when they call and say can I pop round :)
 
I'm very anti social so not having a problem with it at all with the added advantage that now SWMBO doesnt complain when I dont want to go out.
PASS. 10/10

SWMBO, 4 cats, 2 rabbits and our 2 autistic kids will keep DORIS busy
FOC & FAIL.
Disgraceful laddie.:rolleyes:
 

crusader80

Swinger
Did we ask you to come knocking on our e-door? Now off to your virtual Kingdom Hall with all the other god-botherers Mr. J. Witness.
Wrong Religion We are being asked to choose do we show compassion and search our heats finding ways to cry from the heart to break through fear or blindness in our conscience. A struggle for all of us religious or not it is always a personal journey. Christ offer us grace and character to change should you want to "I Thirst" at His passion was a call to us to respond to Him. Knowledge without Love is just hot air each of us are free to choose.
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
There is another article on Spiked discussing the potential mental health implications. It discusses this in the context of the elderly, but is applicable to millions of us:


My aunt is elderly, housebound and vulnerable, but I was relieved to be advised by an NHS nurse who visited her this morning, that I can visit as often as I like as she needs things to be done for her (whilst obviously observing common sense hygiene practice).

I can't emphasise enough the enormous relief this has been for me, and my mental health!. :)
 

OneTenner

LE
Book Reviewer
I'm very anti social so not having a problem with it at all with the added advantage that now SWMBO doesnt complain when I dobt want to go out.

Quick run to Tesco Yesterday for essentials and that's the only time out since last Tuesday when my company furloughed me for 6 weeks.

I have a stack of books that I have bought and never read, loads of new books on Kindle, new aircraft, terrain packs and missions on DCS and just got an Amazon FireStick so I'm good for 6 weeks no problem!!

SWMBO, 4 cats, 2 rabbits and our 2 autistic kids will keep us busy but right now it's nice telling people to F off when they call and say can I pop round :)
I always knew I had a twin - but looking for him would involve talking to people and being 'nice' so.....
 

StBob072

LE
Book Reviewer
I saw an article today which claimed the government have said there are no restrictions on driving for exercise. Seems like lack of consistency is the problem, as to me not driving to go for a walk/exercise makes a lot of sense.

Depends if your mental health is robust enough to handle one walk round the streets per day for an indefinite period...
 
Making out like a champ.

lockdown? No different from going off over the horizon for 41/2 months on a tanker in my youth.

Self isolated, food can’t be wasted, washing is the highlight of the week, reading everything you can find, tiding up and cleaning has become a leisure activity, sod all on the telly, and you can look out at the scenery, but can’t go out.
Yeah, you were isolated because the rest of the crew thought the same about you as most of this site.
 

ndolajim

Old-Salt
Watching the tele this morning I was struck by a page flashed up of photographs of relatives who had died. What on earth motivates people to post these pictures of "loved ones"? What does it mean to the 70 million people who have no idea who they are, or, for that matter people who do know them. Strikes me very odd behaviour, a brief moment of fame in death.
I'm with you davedaffe. Thank goodness I passed through the educational system when we were actually taught to read. I am quite happy amusing myself and not panicking. The very old, sick and veterans of course are recognised.
And just to finish off, when did the media start this all encompassing "loved ones" phrase. There are plenty of relations out there who are far from loved. It is all rather too sickeningly over-sentimental.
Time this country got a grip of itself.
 
Heard The Prince of Wales reading from Wordsworth's "Tintern Abey" on the wireless this morning. Probably the best contribution that he could make at the moment.
Sun shining through the window from clear skies. It is going to be another good day.
Mind you, I had to minimise the navel gazing from some self absorbed priestess on "Thought for the day". Less is definitely more.
 
Top