Your archaeological finds.

Not so very long ago you could walk the Somme battlefield and see all.manner of artefacts just lying around. It was never quite the same at Ypres.
I recall some road widening on the la Boisselle/Ovillers road back in the late 1990s. It was roughly on the line of that would have been the front line trench for elements of 101st Brigade on July 1st, 1916. There were bottles,,broken, SRD jar s
and helmets. I spotted an enamelled water bottle among the debris.
 

Awol

LE
Not so very long ago you could walk the Somme battlefield and see all.manner of artefacts just lying around. It was never quite the same at Ypres.
I recall some road widening on the la Boisselle/Ovillers road back in the late 1990s. It was roughly on the line of that would have been the front line trench for elements of 101st Brigade on July 1st, 1916. There were bottles,,broken, SRD jar s
and helmets. I spotted an enamelled water bottle among the debris.
After 15 years at Ypres I found hundreds of things, and that was without any digging, just seeing what the ploughs brought up. My favourite was a fob watch, although I also had about a dozen rifles, five or six helmets and god knows what else, including a short dagger/knife rusted into it’s sheath.

There was also an entrenching tool, stamped on the back with a five digit number and ‘8 RB’ from a location where the 8th Rifle Brigade had definitely been in 1915.

I went to the Regimental Museum in Winchester to see if I could match a soldier with that number, but sadly they didn’t have a nominal roll for that period.
 
After 15 years at Ypres I found hundreds of things, and that was without any digging, just seeing what the ploughs brought up. My favourite was a fob watch, although I also had about a dozen rifles, five or six helmets and god knows what else, including a short dagger/knife rusted into it’s sheath.

There was also an entrenching tool, stamped on the back with a five digit number and ‘8 RB’ from a location where the 8th Rifle Brigade had definitely been in 1915.

I went to the Regimental Museum in Winchester to see if I could match a soldier with that number, but sadly they didn’t have a nominal roll for that period.
You still got it and I can check the medal index cards
 

Awol

LE
You still got it and I can check the medal index cards
Disposed of by my ex-wife mate. In a particularly nasty display of hatred.

I sent her a text saying that I was in hospital for an intestinal operation (just so she would be prepared if I croaked and she would have some warning and could have some notice with regard to telling the kids the news).

Knowing that I was unable to leave hospital to protect my property, she skipped it all the same day.
 
That’s very true. If I dug up any native artefacts on my property, even though we’re not close to any ‘reserve’, no one with any authority would know about it. Never forget the Caledonia fiasco in 2005.
I fcuking won't. Those parasites decimated new home building all along the Grand River and sent the construction industry in Brant County and Haldimand County into a tailspin. Fcuk them.

Also, one of the excavator operators who I knew up in Brant would purposely send any arrowheads straight into the dump truck just to avoid seeing the job shut down for weeks.
 
Unfortunately we don't have the depth of history in this part of the world that leaves such long lasting remnants for future searchers to find. Most of the stuff left by early inhabitants was disposable, wood or a handy rock.

What we do have are a few old Boer and Zulu war battlefields and ambush sites where a fair bit of stuff used to mark firing positions and other key points of the narrative. Sadly, the fuckwitted have been in there gathering souvenirs so a shallow half covered trench with a handful of 577/450 cases marking the spot someone held the ground is a distant memory.

The really sad part is those cases probably lay around in a drawer or a jar for a few months before going in the bin or were lost by the kids who found them in that drawer.
Nonsense; you have a cornucopia of human history, going back a million years, strewn around your parts.

I'll put that another way; many of the most amazing finds of early humanity, and of ancestors of all the animals around you, are in the rocks, caves and dirty ground around you. You just need to look. On the long trail which Von Lettow-Vorbeck led the British Army in WW1 I've found old 7.92 and .303 cases; I've found arrowheads in Mauritania, shark's teeth and stone cores in Saudi - the last in a place where you'd never imagine any sensible human setting down without a good bottle of wine and a well-maintained car to get the hell out at the end of a weekend, at about here: 25.39193405785779, 46.97166221465815. Plus fossils of all sorts:
IMGP0167.jpg


^ sand dollar, seashell, shark's tooth, all Saudi, seashell, Mauritania. Top right, a rock core found many, many miles from any source material. Unknown age. The other fossils are all from the Cretaceous period (limestone all over the place, with incredible locations to the NE of Riyadh.) I have shelves and shelves of this stuff.

In Botswana, when I was there, and looking specifically for what may have been shelters, there were a number of places even in the few miles around Orapa which looked very promising, and apparently unexplored. I should have bought a spade, but I'm not one for manual labour.
 

Bad Smell

Old-Salt
In Botswana, when I was there, and looking specifically for what may have been shelters, there were a number of places even in the few miles around Orapa which looked very promising, and apparently unexplored. I should have bought a spade, but I'm not one for manual labour.
Whilst spending a few days at the top end of the Okovanga Delta, I visited the Tsodilo Hills for a day trip. Due to the remoteness we had free range of the place (we took the middle road). Mightily impressed with the Bushmen art and the unrestricted access. Whilst climbing among the rocks I came across the usual rodent skeletons from the bird kills and then upon a ledge found a broken cooking pot. It still had the charcoal evidence of burning and at a rough guess I estimated it to be a thousand or so years old. It would have been so easy to just slip a piece into my pocket as a souvenir and no one would have known. Naturally I left everything in situ and took a couple of photos instead.
 
The place was pretty sparsely populated except for wandering tribes heading down from the north and a few coastal strandlopers. Plenty of evidence of strandlopers on coast. A few small settlements of northern migrants inland and the odd Bushman camp in Bots but for the most part, nothing near the level of development and settlement seen in Europe. Zim ruins are good and there are a few places further north with evidence of mining and basic metalworking as well but they're pretty strictly controlled. Tsodilo, Matopos, couple of places on Zim border and Kruger park.

A couple of really old sites, Cradle of Mankind and so on, but apart from bones there are few tools around and little in the way of metal except at northern sites which have also delivered gold ornamentation. Knapped flint a rarity and arrowheads were wood among the Khoisan/Bushmen. Sites containing metal artefacts are much later, Zulu and Boer war, the odd Voortrekker camp. Unfortunately, as mentioned, people are crunts and tend to grab a souvenir from these places, thus destroying evidence of what occurred.

I read somewhere the Cradle of Mankind site was a burial chamber rather than a settlement, but I think there's evidence of a settlement as well.
 

Awol

LE
****'s trick that mate, Remember you saying at the time. Still hopefully your in a better state of mind/health now
Thanks mate. I’ve just started a cracking new job, doing what I like best. Life’s still shít, and I’ve only got a couple of months to get the rest of my stuff from France, but at least (if the job works out) I’ll have the money to do it.

BTW, if any Arrser has a very big lorry and wants to go to central France just before Christmas, for a well paid few days, let me know.
 
A few years back (before the Arab Spring) I was wandering round the Saqqara pyramid field outside Cairo . Behind one of the less visited middle kingdom pyramids there was a team of Germans excavating a shaft tomb. the spoil heap was full of pottery fragments . After asking I grabbed a bag full. I gave most way to the children in my class, but kept a few. The small dish things were used for offerings made at the Pyramid's temple .
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9.414

War Hero
Walking around the Verdun area there is no end of pieces of rusty and sharp shrapnel poking from the ground with numerous pieces per square metre.

Quite sobering when you realise what it took to put it there - and what percentage is unexploded and still buried.
 
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