Your archaeological finds.

Awol

LE
I’m just watching ‘Medieval Dead’ on the yeasterday Channel and they are discussing the ‘Castillon Swords’. In the mid-Seventies someone anonymously found 80 medieval swords in the River Dordorgne just a couple of miles from the villlage of Castillon where the English army was routed by the French (oh, the shame..) in the 15th century.

Since the mid-Seventies, these swords have been periodically appearing for sale on the World stage, at about 12k a pop.

Yes they are seriously rusty, but they have no provenance other than a vague rumour from half a century ago.

I have worked with acid quite recently (in France you can buy Hydrochloric acid and Sulphuric acid in supermarkets FFS) and I know that you can create rust-like pitting on steel after just an hour of immersion.

Anyway, people are paying good money for these swords and good luck to them if it makes them happy.

Seeing these swords on TV brought back a disturbing memory for me. When I was about 8, my brother (aged 5) were in the back garden of our house in a West Country market town, digging a hole, probably to bury one of our pets (guinea pigs, newts or the ubiquitous goldfish, when we hit metal. Careful excavation soon revealed two things that could only be swords, identical to the 15 century swords I’ve just seen on TV. They definitely weren’t Roman as they were too long and slender.

We washed them off under the outside tap and took them in to show Mum. She was delighted and she is the only person I know whose love of history is greater than mine.

Sadly though, she didn’t notify anyone in authority and the swords were relegated to a spare downstairs room that we grandly called the ‘Study’.

A couple of months later, I was bored and went into the study to set out an Airfix battle with the little soldiers. While I was there I saw the swords lying on the grate, next a wood burning stove.

For reasons that have left me guilty and confused for the past 50 years, I picked up one of the swords, wedged it under the stove and bent it up until it snapped.

Mayby I was testing how strong it was? I don’t know, but I feel as guilty as hell to this day. I can see that rusty sword as clear as a bell in my mind’s eye. What happened to them afterwards, I have no idea, but, thinking tha the whole thing might have been a dream, I asked my mum about it recently and she confirmed it.

I still feel the shame.
 
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I live in Hadrian's Wall.country...i.have a few arrow heads, a ballista bolt and some votive rings and brooches. One of my neighbours has a significant collection.of denarii and sestertii
 

Awol

LE
I live in Hadrian's Wall.country...i.have a few arrow heads, a ballista bolt and some votive rings and brooches. One of my neighbours has a significant collection.of denarii and sestertii
A ballista bolt is an impressive thing to find.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I found a damaged gold coin at Vogelsang (1990?) (about 1/4 of it was missing), sold it for £75 while on leave a few months later.
 
It is just the head of a bolt but it would do great damage to an enemy
 

Longlenny

War Hero
Book Reviewer
I was in the pub last Friday and a bloke was in there showing an item he had found on Brook Beach on the IoW. It was a Palstave, a bronze axe head, it was a thing of beauty and it still had a good edge on it after two to two and a half thousand years.
 
I have a few fossils (wife not included) but also have parts of a Heinkel HE111 that crashed along Station Road, Withyham in 1941. Got my old bottle collection still at my Mums, must be 150-200 bottles and pots covering a couple of hundred years.
 

theoriginalphantom

MIA
Book Reviewer
I have a few fossils


we used to pick up small fossils by Richmond leisure centre while walking the dogs. There is a bend in the river between "crap suicide bridge*" and the leisure centre. Loads of the stones there have fossils in. It kept us occupied while the dogs were swimming.





*police came into the building one day asking 'have you seen a wet woman in the past few minutes?' which caused some amusement as the pool was full of em. They'd had someone threaten suicide, jump off the bridge, hit the water, then run off
 
Unfortunately we don't have the depth of history in this part of the world that leaves such long lasting remnants for future searchers to find. Most of the stuff left by early inhabitants was disposable, wood or a handy rock.

What we do have are a few old Boer and Zulu war battlefields and ambush sites where a fair bit of stuff used to mark firing positions and other key points of the narrative. Sadly, the fuckwitted have been in there gathering souvenirs so a shallow half covered trench with a handful of 577/450 cases marking the spot someone held the ground is a distant memory.

The really sad part is those cases probably lay around in a drawer or a jar for a few months before going in the bin or were lost by the kids who found them in that drawer.
 
Unfortunately we don't have the depth of history in this part of the world that leaves such long lasting remnants for future searchers to find. Most of the stuff left by early inhabitants was disposable, wood or a handy rock.
To a degree it’s the same in Canada, big difference is most land owners are wise enough to keep their mouths shut when they find anything. There’s lots of native artifacts to be found but that just opens the door to having their ancestors camped out claiming you’re on sacred land or shïte like that and you end up in court.
 
Working in Darwin, Ozmate I spoke to said something similar. The minute a mineral deposit was found, or something of long term value to the country was built, the local tribes were there like long dogs claiming sacred ground belonging to the tribe.

That would be the sacred ground no one gave a shit about for years until there was a few dollars to be made from it.
 
To a degree it’s the same in Canada, big difference is most land owners are wise enough to keep their mouths shut when they find anything. There’s lots of native artifacts to be found but that just opens the door to having their ancestors camped out claiming you’re on sacred land or shïte like that and you end up in court.

That’s very true. If I dug up any native artefacts on my property, even though we’re not close to any ‘reserve’, no one with any authority would know about it. Never forget the Caledonia fiasco in 2005.
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
We get a lot of metal detectorists knocking on the door wanting to go round the estate.

I used to let them crack on but a few rotten apples have truly taken the piss; getting arsey with our farm manager, trespassing onto neighbouring farms and saying I’d given them permission to be there etc.

They found a few coins of interest but otherwise just a load of old shit. One of the coins was 17th century and Spanish. A previous occupant of my house was the governor of Barbados so we can only assume the coin may have Caribbean origins.

The best random antique I own is a 17th century basket hilted sword. It was going to be thrown in a skip and had been spray painted. It looked like a theatrical prop or something until I stripped all the paint off.
 

Yokel

LE
We get a lot of metal detectorists knocking on the door wanting to go round the estate.

I used to let them crack on but a few rotten apples have truly taken the piss; getting arsey with our farm manager, trespassing onto neighbouring farms and saying I’d given them permission to be there etc.

They found a few coins of interest but otherwise just a load of old shit. One of the coins was 17th century and Spanish. A previous occupant of my house was the governor of Barbados so we can only assume the coin may have Caribbean origins.

The best random antique I own is a 17th century basket hilted sword. It was going to be thrown in a skip and had been spray painted. It looked like a theatrical prop or something until I stripped all the paint off.

Your lack of resourcefulness at taking the piss out of them disappoints me. You must have access to a workshop and some suitable materials.



Go to 2.58.
 
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Bubbles_Barker

LE
Book Reviewer
Unfortunately we don't have the depth of history in this part of the world that leaves such long lasting remnants for future searchers to find. Most of the stuff left by early inhabitants was disposable, wood or a handy rock.

What we do have are a few old Boer and Zulu war battlefields and ambush sites where a fair bit of stuff used to mark firing positions and other key points of the narrative. Sadly, the fuckwitted have been in there gathering souvenirs so a shallow half covered trench with a handful of 577/450 cases marking the spot someone held the ground is a distant memory.

The really sad part is those cases probably lay around in a drawer or a jar for a few months before going in the bin or were lost by the kids who found them in that drawer.
Done the Zulu and Boer War major battlefields - both informative and moving. Particularly Spion Kop - what a bloody mess that was.
 
That’s very true. If I dug up any native artefacts on my property, even though we’re not close to any ‘reserve’, no one with any authority would know about it. Never forget the Caledonia fiasco in 2005.
The only archeological digs l am interested here are all the burial pits with Harvards, DH.82C’s, etc at various old ww2 BCATP airfields around Ontario, the native trinkets can stay buried.
 
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An Inadvertent find digging a foxhole one day at Fort Hood Texas and my shovel hits 2x 105mm HE Howitzer shells (Unfuzed) apparently buried in the 60's by a lazy gun crew not wanting to turn them in and do paperwork. Still bits of crate and banding left as well.

Put me off my feed for a few days
 
A ballista bolt is an impressive thing to find.
Maiden%2BCastle%252C%2BArrow-head%2Bin%2Bvertebrae.jpg


You reminded me of this. A Roman ballista bolt embedded in the spine of a British skeleton found at Maiden Castle in Dorset. I saw the picture as a child and was morbidly fascinated - as kids are. One can only imagine the chaos as those oversized arrows rained down on the tribal army...

iu
 

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