Young people know nothing about anything

There was a rapid change through the 1970's. The Sinclairs were the first affordable calculators I remember, but they didn't have Trig functions to start with, so you still needed your tables. There were better calculators around from the likes of Hewlett Packard, Texas Instruments, but they were very expensive. Others such as Commodore, Canon and Casio soon came along and slide rules were obsolete.
it was 1985 I took my exams
 
You mean they don't have folder and subfolders neatly organised in their browser for anything that could be remotely useful again

They must waste a lot of time

The RAM is like the size of your worktable - the larger it is the more able you are to switch between tasks and do things without needing to constantly put things down and pick them up. The thing that got me about that article was the idea that people never both record anything in favour of searching again and again.
It's interesting how things have changed. From Having masters, master copies; reference books (that would be out of date when printed, depending on subject matter) and [peer-reviewed] journals; lever arch files with serial numbers; card indexes; databases, dynamic databases; downloaded & stored, the web with local storage, cloud storage.
Working at the Citizens Advice Bureau, I was taught to go to the folders & not rely on memory. Quite a lot of people still prefer to know who to ask, rather than knowing.

I remember about 200 (after a Windows/office release?), talking to 2 colleagues about - one had folders , subfolders (some duplicated in the other folders), the other had almost no folders. One relied on his memory and logic, the other on letting the pc do the searching. there was someone else who had even drawn a diagram of where stuff was.

There was a great website/page called The Big Project, that was just links in categories like 'News' (newspaper sites, radio, tv, blogs) 'TRavel' (Rail, plane, RAC rather than holidays). Funny enough, I trusted the links more than searching in Int Explorer or yahoo.

It's become more interesting with wiki's that could
be very unreliable, but seem to be the opposite, google boosting popularity vs reliability (?) etc.
 
It's interesting how things have changed. From Having masters, master copies; reference books (that would be out of date when printed, depending on subject matter) and [peer-reviewed] journals; lever arch files with serial numbers; card indexes; databases, dynamic databases; downloaded & stored, the web with local storage, cloud storage.
Working at the Citizens Advice Bureau, I was taught to go to the folders & not rely on memory. Quite a lot of people still prefer to know who to ask, rather than knowing.

I remember about 200 (after a Windows/office release?), talking to 2 colleagues about - one had folders , subfolders (some duplicated in the other folders), the other had almost no folders. One relied on his memory and logic, the other on letting the pc do the searching. there was someone else who had even drawn a diagram of where stuff was.

There was a great website/page called The Big Project, that was just links in categories like 'News' (newspaper sites, radio, tv, blogs) 'TRavel' (Rail, plane, RAC rather than holidays). Funny enough, I trusted the links more than searching in Int Explorer or yahoo.

It's become more interesting with wiki's that could
be very unreliable, but seem to be the opposite, google boosting popularity vs reliability (?) etc.

Cloud storage is the biggest hoax going, it's all still stored physically somewhere, you just don't have any control over the hardware

Still when people lost data when there cloud provider lost their servers to fire damage, I bet they didn't think the cloud was so wooly and safe then
 
Cloud storage is the biggest hoax going, it's all still stored physically somewhere, you just don't have any control over the hardware

Still when people lost data when there cloud provider lost their servers to fire damage, I bet they didn't think the cloud was so wooly and safe then
Before I retired I moved our email and most of our apps to the cloud (Office 365) and felt comfortable doing so due the redundancy of their datacenters. I still used a third-party (also cloud based) for backup and disaster recovery. Moving to the cloud is essential if you have a very mobile workforce but you have to do your planning.
 
Before I retired I moved our email and most of our apps to the cloud (Office 365) and felt comfortable doing so due the redundancy of their datacenters. I still used a third-party (also cloud based) for backup and disaster recovery. Moving to the cloud is essential if you have a very mobile workforce but you have to do your planning.

Not every cloud provider has redundant datacenters, and people often rush for the cheapest deal not realising it's cheap for a reason
 
Yes. Serious security issues. WIFI is a gaping hole ripe for exploitation.

When non techies can find quite useful wifi sniffers on app stores, one has to be wary
 
Not every cloud provider has redundant datacenters, and people often rush for the cheapest deal not realising it's cheap for a reason
True. In the US Microsoft has a "government cloud" which has extra security and redundancy, which you need to be compliance with the various regulations dealing with health and public safety data.
 

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