Young people know nothing about anything

Chef

LE
Sad to see that attitude, but its always been there. I knew someone, known as a "bright lad" at work. Bettered himself as a mature student, then all his mates called him a "clever c*nt", completely changed the relationship.
A common attitude among some demographics:

Too cool for school.
 

Tool

LE
it was featured on TV recently. Wind up by a South African radio station. He also complained about pulling up at a robot (traffic lights) beside a boy racer. Selected R for Race mode and smashed into the car behind.
That joke is as old as the hills. "Got to the robot (traffic light). Put the car into "D" for "Dice". Fokker in the other lane beat me to the next robot. Put it into "R" for "Race" at the next robot."

"Biltng and Potroast"*? Possibly "Biltong and doosvleis" (the unabridged bootleg of "Bilting and Potroast")

*Seffrican early comedy, Afrikaaners (biltong) vs. rooinekke (potroast).
 
A common attitude among some demographics:

Too cool for school.

I have heard a storiy of a similar attitude in the Army. An ex-Junior Leader arrives at the battalion, answers the question "Can anyone set up this field phone" from his hierarchy Yes, does the job and gets gubbed by a 'comrade' for being clever.
 
I remember being inquisitive about the wrapping of a Kit-Kat! That was in the days of foil and paper, how was it done, at speed, without smashing the contents. I still look at things I pick up and think how they were made and assembled. 20p biro in front of me - 11 components, 6 different materials, plus the ink!

ETA Correction, 12 components and 7 materials - all for 20p!

I agree there is a lot to wonder at and enquire about in this world - although your post did make me chuckle and wonder if you get out much, in daylight to talk to people, real people, live people ;)
 
My bold Inquisitive implies first sighting of subject, and wanting to find out more. This under normal conditions is a natural concept, however, the majority are happy to look, video on their mobiles, share on social media, but not delve further into the subject. As stated up thread, once seen and shared, its on to another socially acceptable trend. The days of " I wonder what all that was about, lets find out" are almost non existent. If it can't be eaten, worn, injected, sniffed, drunk, driven or filmed, it is of little value. Hence, today's modern electronic enhanced, and almost totally reliant generation have no inquisitive gene, which raises the question, where are all the inventive minds that will enhance and help prosper future generations come from? :???:
As my undergrad tutor would say “read around the subject”.
 
It's cool to be ignorant now, innit.
I dunno about that. There are plenty of smart youths out there who are pretty bright, but are quietly working away.
The working world has changed a lot. 10-15 years ago would get a chippy youngster with a 2:1 into recruitment or sales, especially if they had a BSc (full disclosure, I have a BA, and triple-cooked chips on both shoulders).
It seems it was cool to have the pointy shoes, big gob and spiky hair for a bit.
Since then, the world is getting much more geeky.
 

Dalef65

Old-Salt
At least young people know their history.

Year 0 - 43 AD everyone in Britain was black.
1839 - 45 Mrs Thatcher invaded France.
2001 landed on the moon.
1947 Windrush aid ship docks and saves Brits ( who were living in caves )
23 June 2016 Trump bans the EU.
To add to this , a couple of genuine comments I have heard from millennials.....

The war that Saving Private Ryan references started after and because of the 9-11 twin towers.

England won the World Cup in 1996, beating Scotland in the final, with Paul Gascoigne scoring the winning goal..
 
Reading definitely makes all the difference. Incidentally, so does perusing academic forums and reading serious debates about serious topics.

My earliest forum post was around 2003 when I was still a kid and learned the hard way that I didn't actually know anything about D-Day. Some twat completely deconstructed my post and threw it back at me. At that point I learned to shut the hell up and listen and not post anything unless I was confident about my sources and knowledge. The internet has probably given me as much knowledge as books and university, it just depends how you spend your time online - looking at cats on xhamster isn't the same as perusing Nature.com or the more knowledgeable debates on arrse.

Very few of my mates read books and very few post on forums. Mind you, if the education system is anything to go by the humanities is at the bottom of the barrel and largely overrun by woke. There's far more concentration on STEM subjects.

Students are taught basic historical knowledge, but we aren't taught to think historically. This is a mistake, imho, because it means we don't have the foresight to recognise the patterns and dangers that lead to catastrophe in our personal or public lives. This perhaps explains the obsession with media, consumer goods and narcissistic tendencies and why supposedly intelligent people appear on shows like Love Island.

Humanities isn't just about knowing dates, it's about being able to spot the real life Helen before she starts the Trojan War and Falstaff before he comes on stage.
And realising that pitching up in Afghanistan tooled up is a really, really bad idea.
It's not as as if there's any historical precedent, just ask Alexander .
 
I agree there is a lot to wonder at and enquire about in this world - although your post did make me chuckle and wonder if you get out much, in daylight to talk to people, real people, live people ;)

Well, you know, lockdowns etc., it's good to have a few hobbies.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

Gabion Groyne

War Hero
On University Challenge last night.

Paxman: In Operation Chastise in World War II, what was the secret weapon described by it's inventor as, "childishly simple"?

Student: The V2 rocket.

Am I being unfair to think that's surprising, even now? I tried it on 2 degrees GG Jnr who's quite well read (although not WWII), and he didn't know. A ballistic missile being "childishly simple ".
 
And realising that pitching up in Afghanistan tooled up is a really, really bad idea.
It's not as as if there's any historical precedent, just ask Alexander .

Alexander the Great who conquered Afghanistan?
 
And realising that pitching up in Afghanistan tooled up is a really, really bad idea.
It's not as as if there's any historical precedent, just ask Alexander .

Millennials would be wondering why the Meerkats invaded Afghanistan
 

Airblade

Clanker
What I do find more and more prevalent is the immediate taking to social media to ask a question which could have been answered by five minutes of RTFM (Read the fu**ing manual). I do feel that the idea of doing your own research is a dying idea.
There's something weird about social media today but I couldn't really put it into words until I saw someone else say it; Social media has made people feel that any activity or experience must be shared in order to be valid. You can't just go and quietly thumb through an instruction manual looking for the answer to an issue, you have to show the world that you are "doing something productive" with your time and not just sitting around being boring.

If you look around there are some studies suggesting it might be similar to an actual addiction. When you post a status update and receive lots of "likes" from other people your brain gets a bit of a dopamine hit.
 
I remember being inquisitive about the wrapping of a Kit-Kat! That was in the days of foil and paper, how was it done, at speed, without smashing the contents. I still look at things I pick up and think how they were made and assembled. 20p biro in front of me - 11 components, 6 different materials, plus the ink!

ETA Correction, 12 components and 7 materials - all for 20p!
If you have never seen it, Google the TV show "How it's made".

Awesome hangover TV, and interesting.
 

Yokel

LE
On University Challenge last night.

Paxman: In Operation Chastise in World War II, what was the secret weapon described by it's inventor as, "childishly simple"?

Student: The V2 rocket.

Am I being unfair to think that's surprising, even now? I tried it on 2 degrees GG Jnr who's quite well read (although not WWII), and he didn't know. A ballistic missile being "childishly simple ".

But answering the question meant knowing that the May 1943 Dams Raid was called Operation Chastise.
 
On University Challenge last night.

Paxman: In Operation Chastise in World War II, what was the secret weapon described by it's inventor as, "childishly simple"?

Student: The V2 rocket.

Am I being unfair to think that's surprising, even now? I tried it on 2 degrees GG Jnr who's quite well read (although not WWII), and he didn't know. A ballistic missile being "childishly simple ".
I think this is fairly specific knowledge; not many people will know what OP CHASTISE was, but will know the 'bouncing bomb'.
 
I think this is fairly specific knowledge; not many people will know what OP CHASTISE was, but will know the 'bouncing bomb'.
Duringthe controversy re grave removal last year, and the re-release of the movie, all to do with a certain labrador, I'm sure 'Chastise' was used quite a lot.

By the way...

GibsonDog.jpg
 

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