You old timers had it easy?

Jeans oringate from Genoa, Italy
Denims or De Nîmes are from where i live in France, de Nîmes
both were tissues used for boat sails
Levi's Strauss, rivited pouches made both famous during the Carlifonian gold rush
On thé arrse pockets of Levi's, thé stitchng représentés, a Swift
The blue colour, IS Indigo...a plant that french cultivated in the french indies before sugar plantations
I Saïd that
Every day a school day on Arrse.
I always thought that jeans were American in origin.
 
Nice to see Cwt y Gollen in all its glory. It must have been brand new when this film was made. I was passing Crickhowell on my bike a couple of years ago and popped in for a look having not been there since CCF camp in 1977. Sadly overgrown and those 1960s flat top buildings are decaying rapidly. Always sad to see an old barracks let go.

Pretty much gone now.
 
4 mins in we see some paras getting off an RN helicopter.

They’re climbing down a rope as opposed to fast roping.

Anyone know when fast roping became a thing?
I always thought fast roping became a thing when Private Nobby the Nobber tried to climb down a rope, but had greasy hands.
 

The_Duke

LE
Moderator
4 mins in we see some paras getting off an RN helicopter.

They’re climbing down a rope as opposed to fast roping.

Anyone know when fast roping became a thing?
Probably long since out of date, but there used to be three recognised methods of using rope to descend from a helicopter, each with a different requirement of training and currency.

Hand over hand was known as “swarming” and needed the lowest level of training. Fast roping and abseiling both had more training required.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
I've been to Waterloo station and you'd never know a major battle took place there either.
Serious. 15th Light Dragoons (Hussars) fought a small but glorious action on the outskirts of Sahagún 21 December 1808 during the Peninsular War, now regimental day of the Light Dragoons.

It's now an industrial estate apparently.
 

fourteen2two

Old-Salt
I was RAF, in the 80s we were all issued with dpm kit and high leg boots were starting to come in.
One exercise we all turned up in dpm with berets as per orders. Those of us who still had dms had to wear puttees!
Except our fat old flight sergeant, who turns up in dpm, green shirt and black tie and chip bag hat. Plus puttees and shoes! Strange guy but OK.
Much piss taking ensued and rock sncos having sense of humour failure!
 
I was RAF, in the 80s we were all issued with dpm kit and high leg boots were starting to come in.
One exercise we all turned up in dpm with berets as per orders. Those of us who still had dms had to wear puttees!
Except our fat old flight sergeant, who turns up in dpm, green shirt and black tie and chip bag hat. Plus puttees and shoes! Strange guy but OK.
Much piss taking ensued and rock sncos having sense of humour failure!
I´ve probably mentioned this on here before but it´s worth a re-show. I was attached to the Life Guards when BCH were issued in 1983. The RCM was a horrible backward cúnt who made the regiment wear puttees with BCH. I suppose the CO or Adjutant eventually gripped him but we were the laughing stock of the garrison for a while.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
Every day a school day on Arrse.
I always thought that jeans were American in origin.
Nope, as noted a contraction of the French phrase serge de Nîmes (serge from Nîmes).

Here's another one: The first reference to chinos came in 1898, when American armed forces were stationed in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War and their uniforms were sourced from Chinese twill cotton. This colloquial term was born from the Spanish name for China.

And another: The word corduroy is coined in England around the late 18th century as an early form of branding using the French translation of ‘cloth of the King’ (corde du roi).
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Iron creases in legs luxury! we had to pinch the skin together, and sow a running stitch from the ankle to the ball bag, using fishing line.
You had fishing line? We had to use cat gut, that's after hunting, catching, killing, skinning and gutting the bloody thing!
 
Nope, as noted a contraction of the French phrase serge de Nîmes (serge from Nîmes).

Here's another one: The first reference to chinos came in 1898, when American armed forces were stationed in the Philippines during the Spanish-American War and their uniforms were sourced from Chinese twill cotton. This colloquial term was born from the Spanish name for China.

And another: The word corduroy is coined in England around the late 18th century as an early form of branding using the French translation of ‘cloth of the King’ (corde du roi).

I've liked corduroy ever since I first wore it and the impression it made on me.
 
Clocked the guy welcoming the recruits wearing the old denim suit - why don’t they issue something like this stuff for wear in barracks? Smarter and more practical than MTP.
Because that prehistoric shit is only smarter or more practical than MTP in the eyes of people who don't actually have to wear it anymore.
 

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