You had the Corgi Toy, now get the real thing

#1
Aston Martin to build fleet of iconic DB5s equipped with 007's favourite gadgets | Daily Mail Online

Get yourself a limited edition Bond replica DB5 and you can rid yourself of boring passengers and machine gun your way through tailbacks on the M25. Actually, I remember watching a driving programme where they concluded that the DB5 wasn't actually much good. Looked the part though, but crammed full of old technology, I suppose.

It's probably why you'll have to stump up £3.3m for the new one but the original, complete with 007 provenance, only picked up £1.96m at auction recently.

James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 sells for £1.96 million
 
#2
Funny as Aston Martin just after Goldfinger had to sell off unwanted stock at a princely sum of £1k each as the surge in people wanting them did not materialise.
To be accurate its not actually Aston Martin making them. Aston Martin Works is the dealership at Newport Pagnell on the site of where the original DB5's were made. Its considered the "official" factory dealership with the rest being franchised. Aston Martin moved to Gaydon next to the Jaguar factory in 2003.
AM Works has a Heritage part which concentrates on servicing and restoration of the older models. Prince Charles even had his Astons serviced there.
When i bought my Vantage from AM Works i was shown around the back as they say and its pretty impressive. Still good to see proper panel work going on a DB5 or 6 with a One-77 supercar being serviced next to it.
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
But define 'wasn't that good'. A mate of mine who works in the automotive PR sector has a TR6. It's his pride and joy but he freely admits that in performance terms it's not a patch on a modern car - something that has to be remembered when driving it.

I can remember an episode of Top Gear where they asked the studio audience whether they'd prefer an Audi Quattro rally car - one of the originals - or a then-new Mitsubishi Evo in terms of performance, the latter being a road car. Most plumped for the Evo, and I'd have agreed with them.

The uncle of my brother's mate has an original Shelby Cobra. It's apparently a pig to drive, the clutch being so heavy to depress that he has one thigh bigger than the other as a result. Similarly, a lot of other older sports cars were all grunt and about being able to drive them - having the strength for the steering and so on.

I can admire the beauty of some of the classics but in both reliability and drivability terms modern cars win hands-down as far as I'm concerned.
 
#4
Aston Martin moved to Gaydon next to the Jaguar factory in 2003.
They've had a bit of a chequered history. Before Newport Pagnell, they were based in an old factory at Feltham where they used to build military biplanes and then underground trains and tramcars, next to the MoD photographic survey place.

I think they've gone bust more than once.
 
#6
.

It's probably why you'll have to stump up £3.3m for the new one but the original, complete with 007 provenance, only picked up £1.96m at auction recently.

James Bond’s Aston Martin DB5 sells for £1.96 million
But that wasn't the Goldfinger original but a standard DB.5 used in Goldeneye by Pierce Brosnan the original was stolen from Florida in 1997 and never recovered , one of the promotional ones with all the toys made for the Thunderball PR tour went for $4.1 million in 2010.
 
#7
I can't remember all the details, but when they put it through its paces it had poor handling and showed an unremarkable performance and its braking left a lot to be desired.
As indicated in the film...
 
#8
But that wasn't the Goldfinger original but a standard DB.5 used in Goldeneye by Pierce Brosnan the original was stolen from Florida in 1997 and never recovered , one of the promotional ones with all the toys made for the Thunderball PR tour went for $4.1 million in 2010.
Ok, I didn't know that.

But I do know that Auric Goldfinger got sucked off in a plane.

As indicated in the film...
That had to be one of the shortest car chase sequences in movie history. Still, I suppose there's only so many times that you can screech round the Pinewood Studios back lot, crashing into cardboard cartons before people start thinking, "Hang on. Haven't I seen this bit before?".
 

Cold_Collation

LE
Book Reviewer
#9
I can't remember all the details, but when they put it through its paces it had poor handling and showed an unremarkable performance and its braking left a lot to be desired.
I really am unsurprised. But without being unnecessarily dogmatic I wonder if they were comparing in contemporary terms or against modern cars. In absolute performance terms, I'd take a modern warm hatch over most of the beasts of the 50s and 60s.

My brother had a Mk.1 Scirocco which a friend subsequently took back to concours standard. I got to drive it before no-one was allowed to throw it around any more, and had forgotten how older cars have to be driven - and that was 70s technology.
 
#10
I can admire the beauty of some of the classics but in both reliability and drivability terms modern cars win hands-down as far as I'm concerned.
Over the years I've had several V12 Jaguar's both XJ12's and XJS's
I still consider the XJS as one of the best driving cars of its period. I would have another tomorrow.

But the reality is that my current Jaguar XF diesel is as quick as the V12's were, infinetly more reliable and burns less than half the fuel.

I will probably still have anothe V12 t some point though. The noise on full song is just sublime
 
#11
What I like about a lot of the old cars is the craftsmanship. Up until the 60s, there was less start-to-finish production going on. A lot of manufacturers supplied the engines and chassis, which were sent on to coachbuilders for completion. There used to dozens of coachbuilders, particularly after WW1 when motoring came into its own and where there was no shortage of skilled craftsmen who had worked in war production work.

I suppose that sub-frame assembly mass production and unit cost had everything to do with the demise of coachbuilt bodywork.

It sounds like this 007 DB5 replica is a bit of an old-fashioned coachbuilding exercise. But at what a cost.
 
#12
What I like about a lot of the old cars is the craftsmanship. Up until the 60s, there was less start-to-finish production going on. A lot of manufacturers supplied the engines and chassis, which were sent on to coachbuilders for completion. There used to dozens of coachbuilders, particularly after WW1 when motoring came into its own and where there was no shortage of skilled craftsmen who had worked in war production work.

I suppose that sub-frame assembly mass production and unit cost had everything to do with the demise of coachbuilt bodywork.

It sounds like this 007 DB5 replica is a bit of an old-fashioned coachbuilding exercise. But at what a cost.
Totally. Matchless in terms of style.
 
#15
What I like about a lot of the old cars is the craftsmanship. Up until the 60s, there was less start-to-finish production going on. A lot of manufacturers supplied the engines and chassis, which were sent on to coachbuilders for completion. There used to dozens of coachbuilders, particularly after WW1 when motoring came into its own and where there was no shortage of skilled craftsmen who had worked in war production work.

I suppose that sub-frame assembly mass production and unit cost had everything to do with the demise of coachbuilt bodywork.

It sounds like this 007 DB5 replica is a bit of an old-fashioned coachbuilding exercise. But at what a cost.
Agree wholeheartedly. I have a whore house jukebox masquerading as a merc 108 short injection.
Designed by one bloke with a name ( Paul Braque) , last of the hand built models ( doors shut like a bank vault) , an oversquare ohc v8 that revs like a vtec ( 7 and a half grand ffs). 1 st car with an ecu and diagnostic plug ( in 1969!) , and absolutely lethal in the hands of an 18 year old on Britain’s roads.
The sawn in half swing rear axle is fine for a 1960’s lumpy autobahn, but combined with enough power to make the back end break away a la dukes of hazard in second gear on a dry road if floored. Makes for a truly “ fascinating “ experience if you try to abuse it on a wet bendy road.
I love it..
 

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