Yet more trouble on Russia’s “Near Abroad” - Kyrgyzstan kicks-off !!

You mean Scousers are descended from the early Welsh?

A lot of people from North Wales worked in Liverpool, so there is an element of Wenglish in that voice
 
China's Road and Belt policy, and its relentless economic sedition, is a key driver of unrest in the 'stans.

At state level the people can see their oligarchal ruling class becoming immensely rich off the back of Chinese loan sharking investment in infrastructure and resources, and at local level they are being impoverished from the poorest levels of society up by a relentless Chinese dumping of goods that wipes out domestic enterprise.

E.g. a local market has been the basic economic mechanism of human society since agriculture began. Its therefore disturbing to see, in countries from Asia to Africa, and parts of Europe, local markets now dominated by ethnic Chinese selling Chinese goods, undercutting and displacing native traders and production.

Worryingly, the dispossessed poor and young frequently turn to the siren call of radical Islam, courtesy of Saudi's campaign of donating social institutions packaged with Wahhabi proselytising.
A very similar process accompanied American expansion into much of the Americas in the late 19th and much of the 20th centuries and drove widespread anti-Americanism. There the reaction of the poor and exploited was of course Marxism, and the radical elements of the religious establishment became imbued with "liberation theology".

As China begins to fill the role that the US occupied in the late 19th and much of the 20th century, it's not too surprising to see the same processes repeated again.
 
Kyrgyzstan was important from the soviet (/Putin) perspective because the Tian Shan mountains provided the southern defence shield in their paranoid world view. IIRC Kyrgyzstan was home to a string of listening posts watching China; I imagine they are still active even now.

Because the Tian Shan range forks and Kyrgyzstan lies in the fork, it also acted as a sort of natural Maginot line for protecting the mass of strategic and economic assets beyond the north range in Kazakhstan. From Almaty to Moscow is excellent tank country...

These are foothills of the northern Tian Shan, viewed from Almaty (actually my lounge window!). These are just the small ones - a bit further to the left they go up to 7,000m+. Kyrgyzstan is the other side of this stretch of mountains - you have to go many miles to the west to get to the nearest road pass leading to Bishkek.


View attachment 510144
But Photex is more of an expert than you are.
 
I should add that today the commanding heights of the economy of Kyrgyzstan are the gold mines, the most valuable of which are in the hands of Canadian and South African mining companies. The big mine is the Kumtor, which is owned by a Canadian company and accounts for something like 10% of the country's GDP on its own.

Villagers kick off over the presence of mining companies on a regular basis. The mining companies in turn have a record of polluting water supplies with cyanide.

On a more amusing note (although not from his perspective) a British employee of Kumtor was arrested for "racism" when he compared Kyrgyzstan's national delicacy of horse meat sausage to a horse's penis.
 

4(T)

LE
A very similar process accompanied American expansion into much of the Americas in the late 19th and much of the 20th centuries and drove widespread anti-Americanism. There the reaction of the poor and exploited was of course Marxism, and the radical elements of the religious establishment became imbued with "liberation theology".

As China begins to fill the role that the US occupied in the late 19th and much of the 20th century, it's not too surprising to see the same processes repeated again.

I think that British and then US expansion was a bit different, in that they were generally pouring advanced tech, goods and know-how into the upper levels of relatively undeveloped countries, but without negatively impacting the lowest levels of the societies. Its not a fashionable view but IMHO western encroachment usually benefited these lower orders by raising the development of the country overall.

(E.g. British cotton goods imported into India didn't directly compete or displace local weaving, and instead spawned a new and enormous local industry).

By contrast, China is hurting poorer people in many of its target countries by a peculiar process of colonizing from the bottom up - literally having its own people displace native farmers, craftsmen, market traders - even tourist trinket sellers - and wrecking low level economic activities.

When you observe Chinese in an African market selling "African" tat made in China, or Chinese in a Kazakh market selling "Kazakh" blankets also made in China, one understands the bitterness of local people at having their livelihoods taken away from them.

One also wonder how and why these Chinese are in these countries, how they are funded (or subsidised) in order to be able to operate below local market rates, and how they can import manufactured goods that still undercut local goods made by people on absolutely minimal incomes.
 

4(T)

LE
On a more amusing note (although not from his perspective) a British employee of Kumtor was arrested for "racism" when he compared Kyrgyzstan's national delicacy of horse meat sausage to a horse's penis.


Ah, yes. The white mans' burden of having to be guest of honour at a banquet of local delicacies!



"This is fermented camel's milk. You must drink it all - everyone is waiting for your approval"

"This is horse meat sausage. Local joke is that it looks like penis. You must eat. Everyone is watching, etc"

"Dafuq is this?! (Cough!) I mean, this looks nice, what is it?"

"Ah, local speciality. Aged (=rotten) cauliflower with sauce made from horse's..."

"Yum, yum. Let me guess; everyone is watching and waiting for my approval?"

"Only twelve more courses. Next is another local speciality,,,,,"


A valuable expat skill is to be able to swallow anything down (preferably without tasting it) and maintain a glassy smile of enjoyment.
 
One also wonder how and why these Chinese are in these countries, how they are funded (or subsidised) in order to be able to operate below local market rates, and how they can import manufactured goods that still undercut local goods made by people on absolutely minimal incomes.
See also Huawei...
 
A very similar process accompanied American expansion into much of the Americas in the late 19th and much of the 20th centuries and drove widespread anti-Americanism. There the reaction of the poor and exploited was of course Marxism, and the radical elements of the religious establishment became imbued with "liberation theology".

As China begins to fill the role that the US occupied in the late 19th and much of the 20th century, it's not too surprising to see the same processes repeated again.

But, but 'Manifest Destiny'!
 
Ah, yes. The white mans' burden of having to be guest of honour at a banquet of local delicacies!



"This is fermented camel's milk. You must drink it all - everyone is waiting for your approval"

"This is horse meat sausage. Local joke is that it looks like penis. You must eat. Everyone is watching, etc"

"Dafuq is this?! (Cough!) I mean, this looks nice, what is it?"

"Ah, local speciality. Aged (=rotten) cauliflower with sauce made from horse's..."

"Yum, yum. Let me guess; everyone is watching and waiting for my approval?"

"Only twelve more courses. Next is another local speciality,,,,,"


A valuable expat skill is to be able to swallow anything down (preferably without tasting it) and maintain a glassy smile of enjoyment.

Been there.

Done that :)
 
Lake Issykul is stunning
 
I think that British and then US expansion was a bit different, in that they were generally pouring advanced tech, goods and know-how into the upper levels of relatively undeveloped countries, but without negatively impacting the lowest levels of the societies. Its not a fashionable view but IMHO western encroachment usually benefited these lower orders by raising the development of the country overall.

(E.g. British cotton goods imported into India didn't directly compete or displace local weaving, and instead spawned a new and enormous local industry).

By contrast, China is hurting poorer people in many of its target countries by a peculiar process of colonizing from the bottom up - literally having its own people displace native farmers, craftsmen, market traders - even tourist trinket sellers - and wrecking low level economic activities.

When you observe Chinese in an African market selling "African" tat made in China, or Chinese in a Kazakh market selling "Kazakh" blankets also made in China, one understands the bitterness of local people at having their livelihoods taken away from them.

One also wonder how and why these Chinese are in these countries, how they are funded (or subsidised) in order to be able to operate below local market rates, and how they can import manufactured goods that still undercut local goods made by people on absolutely minimal incomes.

Maybe they're made by prison labour in China in factories that have no labour costs and no electricity costs etc, not the easiest thing to compete with unless you can make people pay to work in your factories for free
 
Ah, yes. The white mans' burden of having to be guest of honour at a banquet of local delicacies!



"This is fermented camel's milk. You must drink it all - everyone is waiting for your approval"

"This is horse meat sausage. Local joke is that it looks like penis. You must eat. Everyone is watching, etc"

"Dafuq is this?! (Cough!) I mean, this looks nice, what is it?"

"Ah, local speciality. Aged (=rotten) cauliflower with sauce made from horse's..."

"Yum, yum. Let me guess; everyone is watching and waiting for my approval?"

"Only twelve more courses. Next is another local speciality,,,,,"


A valuable expat skill is to be able to swallow anything down (preferably without tasting it) and maintain a glassy smile of enjoyment.
You've seen the opening episode of 'The Ambassadors '?
 

Poppy

LE
Ah, yes. The white mans' burden of having to be guest of honour at a banquet of local delicacies!



"This is fermented camel's milk. You must drink it all - everyone is waiting for your approval"

"This is horse meat sausage. Local joke is that it looks like penis. You must eat. Everyone is watching, etc"

"Dafuq is this?! (Cough!) I mean, this looks nice, what is it?"

"Ah, local speciality. Aged (=rotten) cauliflower with sauce made from horse's..."

"Yum, yum. Let me guess; everyone is watching and waiting for my approval?"

"Only twelve more courses. Next is another local speciality,,,,,"


A valuable expat skill is to be able to swallow anything down (preferably without tasting it) and maintain a glassy smile of enjoyment.

In Azerbaijan lunch almost every day was this foul brown rice thing that all of us hated. On our first day at work in Kyrgyzstan they wanted to have a special lunch to welcome us. I could almost hear the others screaming internally when they realised it was the same thing. However, it turns out that Plov is actually quite nice when it is made by someone who actually knows how to cook!

I did tell them to shove their fermented mare's milk when they tried that a few days later.
 
Ah, yes. The white mans' burden of having to be guest of honour at a banquet of local delicacies!

A valuable expat skill is to be able to swallow anything down (preferably without tasting it) and maintain a glassy smile of enjoyment.
I still rather like the story of the British envoy to some Arab country way back when having to attend one of those banquets and the guest elaborately presented him a large bowl of sheep's eyeballs... and the envoy, thinking he'd have to go along with it, grabbed hold of one and popped it into his mouth to the stunned horror of his Arab guest - who was only presenting the eyes to confirm that the dead sheep was fresh....

.....but from that moment the British myth that Arab's Eat Sheep's Eyeballs was born.... dunno if that's true or not. I can't imagine the eyeball being a flavoursome delicacy in any culture..
 
I think that British and then US expansion was a bit different, in that they were generally pouring advanced tech, goods and know-how into the upper levels of relatively undeveloped countries, but without negatively impacting the lowest levels of the societies. Its not a fashionable view but IMHO western encroachment usually benefited these lower orders by raising the development of the country overall.

(E.g. British cotton goods imported into India didn't directly compete or displace local weaving, and instead spawned a new and enormous local industry).

By contrast, China is hurting poorer people in many of its target countries by a peculiar process of colonizing from the bottom up - literally having its own people displace native farmers, craftsmen, market traders - even tourist trinket sellers - and wrecking low level economic activities.

When you observe Chinese in an African market selling "African" tat made in China, or Chinese in a Kazakh market selling "Kazakh" blankets also made in China, one understands the bitterness of local people at having their livelihoods taken away from them.

One also wonder how and why these Chinese are in these countries, how they are funded (or subsidised) in order to be able to operate below local market rates, and how they can import manufactured goods that still undercut local goods made by people on absolutely minimal incomes.
You're viewing American exploitation of Central America through some very rose tinted glasses there. A brief view at the history involved will show that there should be no surprise at the long lasting and deep seated anti-Americanism in that region, especially given how the poorest strata of society suffered the most.

As I said, given how the Chinese seem to be following in the footsteps of the Americans, there should be no surprise how local attitudes towards them should follow similar paths as well.
 
In Azerbaijan lunch almost every day was this foul brown rice thing that all of us hated. On our first day at work in Kyrgyzstan they wanted to have a special lunch to welcome us. I could almost hear the others screaming internally when they realised it was the same thing. However, it turns out that Plov is actually quite nice when it is made by someone who actually knows how to cook!

I did tell them to shove their fermented mare's milk when they tried that a few days later.

It was the tea with butter that did for me in Tajikistan.

Plov was the meal of choice for the Afghans I was working with the first time I worked there in 2004. Like you say, it gets old after eating nothing else for a month.

On my last day at work they took me for kebab, which was joyous. I still don’t understand why they didn’t eat it more often.
 
You're viewing American exploitation of Central America through some very rose tinted glasses there. A brief view at the history involved will show that there should be no surprise at the long lasting and deep seated anti-Americanism in that region, especially given how the poorest strata of society suffered the most.

As I said, given how the Chinese seem to be following in the footsteps of the Americans, there should be no surprise how local attitudes towards them should follow similar paths as well.

That’s why they pulled the ‘Man from Del Monte’ adverts. Someone realised that the United Fruit company, as a monopsony, literally had the power of life or death over a community’s economy. Hence also the origin of the phrase ‘Banana Republic’.

Once, consulting on a project for the US DoD that was to take place in Central America, I was appalled at the complete lack of knowledge of their own history amongst the septics in that little corner of the Pentagon.
 
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