Yemen

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
Thanks for the correction & the very interesting linked report of the 1967 floods - my post now corrected:thumright:
It stuck in my mind. We left in the March after two hot dry years, and were staying with my Aunt 'between MQs'. I remember watching pictures of the flooding on her TV.



(It flooded in black and white).
 
The following has also been posted to the main COVD-19 thread.

COVID-19 is now well and truly established in Yemen.
Yemen's misery now includes hundreds of COVID-19 deaths, according to health officials
The official count of infections and deaths is low, at 106 infections and 15 deaths. However, people are dying like flies, but the lack of testing and medical care means that few are being classified as COVID-19 deaths.

With the lack of a functional central government or public health service, evidence can only be anecdotal. As one example though a grave digger in Aden said he's never seen so many dead, even as a product of the civil war.
One gravedigger in Aden told AP he'd never seen such a constant flow of dead — even in a city that has seen multiple bouts of bloody street battles during the civil war.

The WHO are saying the situation could be disastrous, with up to half the population becoming infected and the potential for more than 40,000 dead.
"If you have a full-blown community transmission in Yemen, because of the fragility, because of the vulnerability, because of the susceptibility, it will be disastrous," said Altaf Musani, the World Health Organization chief in Yemen.

WHO says its models suggest that, under some scenarios, half of Yemen's population of 30 million could be infected and more than 40,000 could die.

The health system has collapsed because of the war, and if you get seriously ill you're basically stuffed as there are no more than 500 ventilators and 700 ICU beds in the entire country of 30 million. The WHO are trying to get more test kits and PPE for Yemen, but as well as the global shortage, the problems of Yemen make supplying them difficult.
Yemen has no more than 500 ventilators and 700 ICU beds nationwide. There is one oxygen cylinder per month for every 2.5 million people. WHO provided some 6,700 test kits to Yemen, split between north and south, and said another 32,000 are coming. The health agency said it is trying to procure more protective equipment and supplies to fight the virus. But WHO said efforts have been hampered because of travel restrictions and competition with other countries.

The south is in chaos and nobody is in charge. Health personnel have little in the way of PPE, and are terrified of treating anyone with symptoms. Many medical facilities have closed as the staff have fled or turn patients away. If you are suspected of having COVID-19 in Aden, nobody will treat you.
The south is a picture of utter collapse: rival factions within the U.S.-backed coalition are battling for control. No one appears to be in charge as an already wrecked health system seems to have completely shut down.

Health personnel, with little protective equipment, are terrified of treating anyone suspected of having the coronavirus.

Many medical facilities in Aden have closed as staffers flee or simply turn patients away. No one is answering a hotline set up by UN-trained Rapid Response Teams to test suspected cases at home.

"If you are suspected of having corona and you are in Aden, most probably you will wait at home for your death," said Mohammed Roubaid, deputy head of the Aden health office.

In the north things are bad as well, but the rebels are suppressing any information about the outbreak there.
In the north, meanwhile, the Houthi rebels in power there are waging a campaign to aggressively suppress any information about the scale of the outbreak, even as doctors told the AP of increasing infections and deaths.

Much of the story is about how the political situation in Yemen is affecting efforts to contain the outbreak there and is worth reading for those details.
 
The following has also been posted to the main COVD-19 thread.

COVID-19 is now well and truly established in Yemen.
Yemen's misery now includes hundreds of COVID-19 deaths, according to health officials
The official count of infections and deaths is low, at 106 infections and 15 deaths. However, people are dying like flies, but the lack of testing and medical care means that few are being classified as COVID-19 deaths.

With the lack of a functional central government or public health service, evidence can only be anecdotal. As one example though a grave digger in Aden said he's never seen so many dead, even as a product of the civil war.


The WHO are saying the situation could be disastrous, with up to half the population becoming infected and the potential for more than 40,000 dead.


The health system has collapsed because of the war, and if you get seriously ill you're basically stuffed as there are no more than 500 ventilators and 700 ICU beds in the entire country of 30 million. The WHO are trying to get more test kits and PPE for Yemen, but as well as the global shortage, the problems of Yemen make supplying them difficult.


The south is in chaos and nobody is in charge. Health personnel have little in the way of PPE, and are terrified of treating anyone with symptoms. Many medical facilities have closed as the staff have fled or turn patients away. If you are suspected of having COVID-19 in Aden, nobody will treat you.


In the north things are bad as well, but the rebels are suppressing any information about the outbreak there.


Much of the story is about how the political situation in Yemen is affecting efforts to contain the outbreak there and is worth reading for those details.
Well Saudi, UAE and Iran are rich countries who have been fighting this war and are next to it should sort it out. Arab solutions to Arab problems, although Iran is not an Arab country it has caused enough problems in Arabia.
 
Well Saudi, UAE and Iran are rich countries who have been fighting this war and are next to it should sort it out. Arab solutions to Arab problems, although Iran is not an Arab country it has caused enough problems in Arabia.
I have a feeling that beyond the WHO organising a limited amount of test kits and PPE for them, Yemen aren't going to receive much help from anyone.
 

Grownup_Rafbrat

LE
Book Reviewer
I have a feeling that beyond the WHO organising a limited amount of test kits and PPE for them, Yemen aren't going to receive much help from anyone.
Whilst I feel sorry for individuals, I cannot feel sorry for the country. The waste of roads, schools, hospitals, irrigation, housing and dams that we left them in 1967 has been atrocious.
 
Whilst I feel sorry for individuals, I cannot feel sorry for the country. The waste of roads, schools, hospitals, irrigation, housing and dams that we left them in 1967 has been atrocious.
If you look at the comments section on YouTube videos posted about the British miltary in Aden, there are a lot from Yemenis from Aden who say that the British period was a golden era, or there parents said it was, and wish the British were back. The same as Africans in Zimbabwe looking fondly back to Ian Smith and Rhodesia to what they have now.
 
The Saudis say that a truce has been agreed between the Saudi-backed Yemenis and the UAE back Yemenis.
Saudis say Yemen's government, separatists agree to truce
The Saudi-led coalition embroiled in a years-long conflict in Yemen announced on Monday that Emirati-backed southern separatists and the country's internationally recognized government have agreed to a ceasefire after months of infighting.

The agreement aims to close the rift between Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, nominal allies in a war against Yemen's Iran-backed Houthi rebels.

Coalition spokesperson Col. Turki al-Maliki said delegates from the separatists' Southern Transitional Council (STC) and the Yemeni government are meeting in the Saudi capital of Riyadh to push the implementation of a November 2019 deal that ended earlier fighting.

This truce doesn't seem to cover anyone else, including the Houtis.

The UAE-backed STC want to create an independent south Yemen. This truce does not appear to involve them giving up that goal.
The secessionist council, which is an umbrella group of heavily armed and well-financed militias propped up by the UAE since 2015, hopes to restore an independent southern Yemen, which existed from 1967 until unification in 1990.
 
Money makes the world go round.

'One day after sanctioning 20 Saudis for human rights violations, Britain on Tuesday sent a very different signal to the government in Riyadh, ending a moratorium on arm sales to Saudi Arabia over its involvement in the bloody conflict in Yemen.

'A court ruling last year forced the British government to suspend sales of arms and military equipment to Saudi Arabia because of the risk they would be used in violation of international humanitarian law. But after a review, Liz Truss, Britain’s international trade secretary, said on Tuesday that procedures had been revised to comply with the court’s concerns, and that the suspension of licenses for the export of arms to Saudi Arabia was at an end. Her decision prompted anger from opposition politicians and campaigners, protests that were sharpened by the timing of the announcement. On Monday, the foreign secretary, Dominic Raab, imposed sanctions on 47 people, including 25 Russians accused of aiding and abetting in the death of Sergei L. Magnitsky, a Russian lawyer who died after brutal treatment in detention in 2009.

'The British list also included two people from Myanmar and 20 Saudis accused in the assassination of the dissident Saudi columnist Jamal Khashoggi, whose death caused outrage around the world. Mr. Raab argued that, as it charts its new course on the international stage outside the European Union — which Britain formally quit in January — the British government was “absolutely committed to the United Kingdom being an even stronger force for good in the world.”

'Britain is not alone in wanting to push ahead with arms sales to Saudi Arabia. Despite opposition in Congress, the U.S. State Department informally notified lawmakers in January that it intended to proceed with the sale of precision-guided missiles worth $478 million to the country.'


 
Haven't heard about this particular disaster waiting to happen before. All rather ironic; both the name of the tanker, and that the region which exports so much oil could be about to get a whole lot of it back, though not by the means they'd desire.

'The U.N. environment chief said Wednesday that "time is running out" to avert an environmental, economic and humanitarian catastrophe from a deteriorating oil tanker loaded with 1.1 million barrels of crude oil that is moored off the coast of Yemen. Inger Andersen told the U.N. Security Council that an oil spill from the FSO Safer, which hasn't been maintained for over five years, would wreck ecosystems and livelihoods for decades. "Prevention of such a crisis from precipitating is really the only option," she said. "Despite the difficult operational context, no effort should be spared to first conduct a technical assessment and initial light repairs." Andersen urged the international community to come up with a response plan should an oil spill occur. The tanker could release four times more oil than the notorious Exxon Valdez disaster did, off Alaska in 1989, she said.

'Houthi rebels, who control the area where the ship is moored, have denied U.N. inspectors access to the vessel so they could assess the damage and look for ways to secure the tanker by unloading the oil and pulling the ship to safety. But the rebels recently signaled they would approve a U.N. mission to the ship, according to the U.N.

'Internal documents obtained by The Associated Press last month show that seawater has entered the engine compartment of the tanker, causing damage to pipes and increasing the risk of sinking. Rust has covered parts of the tanker and the inert gas that prevents the tanks from gathering inflammable gases, has leaked out. Experts say maintenance is no longer possible because the damage to the ship is irreversible, according to an AP report June 26.

'The Japanese-built tanker was sold to the Yemeni government in 1980s to store up to 3 million barrels pumped from oil fields in Marib province before it was exported. The ship is 360 meters (1,181 feet) long with 34 storage tanks. In a tweet last month, Britain's Ambassador to Yemen drew a comparison to a widely reported fuel leak in Russia. "20,000 tonnes of fuel in Russia is causing massive environmental damage in Siberia. The SAFER tanker in Yemen has 150,000 tonnes of crude which would devastate the Red Sea and its coast if it leaked," warned Ambassador Michael Aron.'


 
Haven't heard about this particular disaster waiting to happen before. All rather ironic; both the name of the tanker, and that the region which exports so much oil could be about to get a whole lot of it back, though not by the means they'd desire.

'The U.N. environment chief said Wednesday that "time is running out" to avert an environmental, economic and humanitarian catastrophe from a deteriorating oil tanker loaded with 1.1 million barrels of crude oil that is moored off the coast of Yemen. Inger Andersen told the U.N. Security Council that an oil spill from the FSO Safer, which hasn't been maintained for over five years, would wreck ecosystems and livelihoods for decades. "Prevention of such a crisis from precipitating is really the only option," she said. "Despite the difficult operational context, no effort should be spared to first conduct a technical assessment and initial light repairs." Andersen urged the international community to come up with a response plan should an oil spill occur. The tanker could release four times more oil than the notorious Exxon Valdez disaster did, off Alaska in 1989, she said.

'Houthi rebels, who control the area where the ship is moored, have denied U.N. inspectors access to the vessel so they could assess the damage and look for ways to secure the tanker by unloading the oil and pulling the ship to safety. But the rebels recently signaled they would approve a U.N. mission to the ship, according to the U.N.

'Internal documents obtained by The Associated Press last month show that seawater has entered the engine compartment of the tanker, causing damage to pipes and increasing the risk of sinking. Rust has covered parts of the tanker and the inert gas that prevents the tanks from gathering inflammable gases, has leaked out. Experts say maintenance is no longer possible because the damage to the ship is irreversible, according to an AP report June 26.

'The Japanese-built tanker was sold to the Yemeni government in 1980s to store up to 3 million barrels pumped from oil fields in Marib province before it was exported. The ship is 360 meters (1,181 feet) long with 34 storage tanks. In a tweet last month, Britain's Ambassador to Yemen drew a comparison to a widely reported fuel leak in Russia. "20,000 tonnes of fuel in Russia is causing massive environmental damage in Siberia. The SAFER tanker in Yemen has 150,000 tonnes of crude which would devastate the Red Sea and its coast if it leaked," warned Ambassador Michael Aron.'


The issue is going to be who gets the money from selling the oil. The Houthis would undoubtedly have happily sold the oil and emptied the tanker long ago if they could have been paid for it. There's a Western block on that happening though, which means it has just sat there.

Some sort of compromise will be needed to resolve this. An example could be for the oil to be sold to a neutral third party, the Americans keeping their hands off the money, and the money being spent by the UN to provide food and medical supplies to Yemen, split between the different regions on an agreed basis.
 
More apparent evidence of the loss of US influence in the Middle East.

'Saudi Arabia has asked Russia to intervene and help prevent the strategic city of Marib from falling into the hands of Yemen’s Houthis, the Al-Akhbar newspaper reported.

'The paper quoted sources as saying that the Saudi Foreign Minister, Faisal Bin Farhan, spoke on the phone with his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, and asked him to mediate between the kingdom and the Houthis to stop the group from advancing towards Marib.

'The sources explained that the Saudi move aimed to exert pressure on the United States, which has been ignoring Saudi appeals to prevent the Houthis from taking over Marib as President Donald Trump is preoccupied with the presidential elections scheduled for November.

'Trump has previously used Russia’s involvement in the Middle East as a justification for the continued arms sales to Saudi Arabia, which has been repeatedly accused of war crimes by human rights bodies. The US president has said if Washington doesn’t provide the weapons the kingdom will look to Russia and China to obtain them and Americans would not benefit as a result.'


 
Last edited:
A warm and rousing welcome for the new government.

'At least 16 people have been killed and 60 more wounded in an attack on Aden airport in Yemen, a security source said, shortly after a plane carrying a newly formed cabinet arrived from Saudi Arabia.

'The source of the blast was not immediately clear and no group claimed responsibility for attacking the airport.

'Loud blasts and gunfire were heard at the airport shortly after the plane arrived, witnesses said.

'No one on the Government plane was hurt, but officials at the scene said they saw bodies lying on the tarmac and elsewhere at the airport.

'Yemeni Communication Minister Naguib al-Awg, who was also on the Government plane, told The Associated Press that he heard two explosions, suggesting they were drone attacks.'


 

Poppycock

Old-Salt
This Yemeni retaliation against the al Sauds is from a few days ago; today (26 March), to mark the sixth anniversary of the start of US/Saudi/British/UAE led attacks on Yemen, Yemeni forces let rip with another barrage of missiles against Saudi

Good on them:thumright:

 

Poppycock

Old-Salt
The battle for the oil rich Marib is heating up following an offensive by the Ansarullah forces in recent weeks aiming to take the city & surrounds

Poorest country in the region holding-out for 6-full years now, against a coalition of the world's richest countries & most advanced military kit. You've got to take your hat off to them.

 

Poppycock

Old-Salt
Technically this should be in a "Saudi Arabia latest fighting reports" thread

Ansar Allah forces attacking a position claimed to be within Saudi's borders

 

Latest Threads

Top