Yemen

Conditions continue to deteriorate in what is being called the world's worst humanitarian crisis.
Why the West is no honest broker in the world's worst humanitarian crisis | CBC News
Two thirds of the population are dependent upon food aid, eight million people are on the verge of starvation, and there are 400,000 severely malnourished children.
  • 2/3 of the population dependent on aid.
  • Eight million people on the verge of starvation.
  • 400,000 severely malnourished children.
An NGO representative said the war is not forgotten, it is being ignored.
"Often people say that this is a forgotten war," said Save the Children's Nadine Drummond, speaking via Skype from the Yemeni capital of Sanaa earlier this week. "No. This war hasn't been forgotten. It's been ignored."
Problems are about to get worse if the port of Hodeidah comes under siege. The port is responsible for 69% of Yemen's food imports and 40% of its fuel, which is essential for powering water pumps.
Experts say much more pain and suffering is inevitable if Western governments don't act more decisively to force a ceasefire, especially with the battle for the city of Hodeidah imminent.

Its seaport accounts for 69 per cent of Yemen's food imports and nearly 40 per cent of its fuel — which is key to keeping water pumps moving and cholera at bay.
NGOs are saying the US, UK, and French governments have the ability to so something to prevent this, but have decided that it is not to their benefit to act.
"The U.S. government, the U.K. government and the French government. Those are the countries that have the ability to influence what happens on the ground," said Drummond. "And so far they've either failed to act or have decided that it's not within their own benefit."
A British Conservative MP who has taken an interest in the situation said that the UK has close security and commercial relationships with Saudi Arabia and will therefor support Saudi Arabia in this.
"Britain has a very close security and commercial relationship with Saudi Arabia," said British Conservative MP Andrew Mitchell from his office in London.

"They are a very close ally of ours. And of course Saudi Arabia is a wealthy country surrounded by enemies in the region, and it's therefore quite difficult for Britain to act as a candid friend and to tell them they need to be a promoter of peace rather than a supporter of the conflict there."
He also said that a British draft resolution on Yemen was rejected at the UN because it was so one-sided.
Mitchell, a former international development minister, said one of the U.K.'s draft resolutions on Yemen was rejected at the UN "because it was so one-sided."
The UAE has been leading coalition troops in this, most of them Yemenis fighters or mercenaries. They have advanced along the coast and apparently intend to encircle the city rather than fight through to the centre.
The United Arab Emirates has been leading coalition troops on the ground. Made up mainly of Yemeni fighters and mercenaries, the force advanced along the Red Sea coast from the south to capture Hodeidah's airport earlier this week.

Their plan is reportedly to take control of the port in the north by moving around the city inland without having to battle street to street through the centre, where Houthi fighters have been fortifying their positions.
It is not clear from the report whether the plan is conduct an extended siege and starve the defenders out, or whether they have something else in mind.

Aid groups have been evacuating most of their aid workers and trying to bring in extra supplies through the port in case it is closed for months by the fighting.
Aid agencies are clearly expecting the worst. They have been pulling all but essential workers out of the city. Save the Children has left just 16 out of 206 staff members in the city.

They have also been frantically trying to send in extra supplies in case the port is shut down or cut off by fighting for months.
Claims by the UAE that the military plan is motivated by humanitarian concerns have been dismissed by aid NGOs who say that it is simply a justification for an attack that will have "catastrophic consequences".
Suggestions from the Emirates that the coalition's military push to control the city is partly motivated by humanitarian concern have been heavily criticized by non-governmental organizations.

"The so-called relief plan announced by the Arab coalition in Yemen must be seen for exactly what it is: a justification to launch an attack that will have catastrophic consequences," Amanda Catanzano of the International Rescue Committee said in a statement Tuesday.
 
Yemeni medical officials have stated that Saudi coalition air strikes in the port of Hodeida killed at least 28 and wounded at least 70 on Thursday. The Saudi coalition has denied carrying out attacks there.
Airstrikes in Yemen leave at least 28 dead | CBC News
Yemeni medical officials said the Saudi-led coalition fighting Yemen's Shia rebels conducted airstrikes in the rebel-held port city of Hodeida on Thursday, leaving at least 28 dead and 70 wounded, although the coalition has denied carrying out any attacks there.
Most of the victims appear to be civilians.
The airstrikes were close to the city's main public hospital, al-Thawra, and near a popular fish market, said the medical officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to brief the media. The wounded, mostly civilians, were hospitalized.
The Saudi coalition claimed they didn't conduct any air strikes and blamed it on the rebels. It is not clear from the reports whether he is claiming this was a "false flag" incident conducted by the rebels.
The coalition's spokesperson, Col. Turki al-Malki, told the Saudi-owned Al Arabiya satellite news channel that it didn't carry out any attacks on Hodeida and blamed the attacks on the rebels, known as Houthis. He said the coalition "follows a strict and transparent approach based on the rules of international law."
The following is a Reuters photograph of the supposed air strike near al-Thawra Hospital in Hodeida.



The following is a Reuters photograph of the bodies of the people supposedly killed.


The UN special envoy has been talking to both sides to engage in peace talks.
UN special envoy Martin Griffiths has held talks with both sides in recent weeks in hopes of preventing a full-scale coalition assault on Hodeida. He has been pushing to bring the warring parties to restart peace talks.
There are plans to invite both sides to Geneva for talks on the 6th of September.
Later on Thursday, Griffiths announced plans to invite Yemen's warring parties to Geneva on Sept. 6 to hold the first round of consultations.
The war in Yemen is regarded as the world's worst humanitarian crisis.
The three-year war has left over 10,000 people dead, badly damaged Yemen's infrastructure and crippled its health system, in the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with more than 22.2 million people in need of assistance.
The World Health Organization is trying to arrange for a temporary cease fire to conduct a vaccination campaign to prevent another outbreak of cholera.
World Health Organization officials on Friday called on the sides to halt fighting for at least three days for a vaccination effort that aims to prevent another deadly wave of cholera.
 
My Yemen has been pretty good lately.

There was a point where it got a bit 'stuck', but it's alright now. I think.

In fact, there was a point where it all went a bit too far and covered my entire keyboard. That was a good one.

I seem to remember getting my "S" and "Y" keys mixed up a bit. I'm sure I put them back on properly though.
 
Yemeni medical officials have stated that Saudi coalition air strikes in the port of Hodeida killed at least 28 and wounded at least 70 on Thursday. The Saudi coalition has denied carrying out attacks there.
Airstrikes in Yemen leave at least 28 dead | CBC News

Most of the victims appear to be civilians.

The Saudi coalition claimed they didn't conduct any air strikes and blamed it on the rebels. It is not clear from the reports whether he is claiming this was a "false flag" incident conducted by the rebels.
Maybe the investigators from Bellingcat would be so kind to clarify the situation?
Though ... for them, probably, the case in not sufficiently 'interesting'.

'Air strikes' in Yemen kill at least 20
At least 20 people in the rebel-held Yemeni port city of Hudaydah have been killed in air strikes blamed on the Saudi-led coalition.
The strikes hit a fish market and the entrance to a nearby hospital, eyewitnesses and medics said.
So BBC reports about air strikes that hit a hospital.
But the rebels haven't any warplanes.
 
Security Council Demands End to Yemen Violence, Adopting Resolution 2216 (2015), with Russian Federation Abstaining | Meetings Coverage and Press Releases

UN Resolution 2216. Russia abstained. Houthi’s to withdraw from recently (2016) seized areas, relinquish arms seized from the military, cease all actions within the legitimate govt of Yemen and comply with previous UN Resolutions:
Adopting resolution 2216 (2015) by 14 affirmative votes to none against, with one abstention (Russian Federation), the Council also demanded that the Houthis, withdraw from all areas seized during the latest conflict, relinquish arms seized from military and security institutions, cease all actions falling exclusively within the authority of the legitimate Government of Yemen and fully implement previous Council resolutions.
Refrain from provocation and threats to neighbouring countries which would include lobbing rockets over the border, release political prisoners and stop the recruitment of children:
Acting under chapter VII of Charter, the body also called upon the Houthis to refrain from any provocations or threats to neighbouring States, release the Minister for Defence, all political prisoners and individuals under house arrest or arbitrarily detained, and end the recruitment of children.
Imposing sanctions, asset freezes and an arms embargo:
Imposing sanctions, including a general assets freeze, travel ban and arms embargo, on Abdulmalik al-Houthi, who it called the Houthi leader, and Ahmed Ali Abdullah Saleh, son of the president who stepped down in 2011, the resolution called upon all Yemeni parties to abide by the Gulf Cooperation Council and other initiatives and to resume the United Nations-brokered political transition.
Safety of civilians and evacuations:
Reaffirming the need for all parties to ensure the safety of civilians, the Council called on parties to facilitate the evacuation by concerned States and international organizations of their civilians and personnel from Yemen. The resolution requested the Secretary-General to report on the implementation of the resolution within 10 days.
Russia explains their absention, everyone else on the security council voted yes:
Explaining his delegation’s decision to abstain, the representative of the Russian Federation said the text failed to take into account proposals his country had made, refused to call on all sides to halt fire and lacked clarity on a humanitarian pause. There were inappropriate references to sanctions, he added, stating that resolution must not result in an escalation of the crisis.
Jordan the then President said “was a clear and firm signal to the Houthis and all those supporting them”:
The representative of Jordan Council President for April, said, however, that the adoption of the resolution under Chapter VII was a clear and firm signal to the Houthis and all those supporting them to comply with their obligations. Stressing the regional ramifications of the escalating conflict, she stated that the Council was prepared to consider any additional measures required.
despite the numerous calls for a political transition, the Houthi’s continued and intensified military action:
The Council had for months demanded that the parties in Yemen proceed with the agreed upon political transition, the representative of the United States recalled. In response, however, the Houthis had intensified their military actions, threatening the country’s and region’s security. For that reason, she strongly supported the resolution, which provided a general asset freeze and travel ban on spoilers.
Yemen representative happy with the resolution:
Also welcoming the adoption, the representative of Yemen described it as a tangible demonstration of the seriousness of the international community’s support for his people’s effort to restore peace, rule of law and democracy. He said that while the Yemeni Government and other parties were finalizing a comprehensive peace framework, opposition forces had mounted a coup d’état, threatening the social fabric and cohesion of the Yemeini people. He applauded the response of the Gulf Cooperation Council to the crisis as consistent with the imperative of preserving Yemen’s Constitution and rebuffing Iran’s designs.
Even Venezuela voted in favour, but with reservations:
While also voting in favour of the text, the representative of Venezuela expressed concern at what he called the lack of inclusion and transparency in the deliberations, maintaining that the views of non-permanent members were side-lined.
 
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Bellingcat will not investigate this or similar incidents for understandable reasons.
I believe once again you’re talking out of your hoop: yemen Archives - bellingcat
Well, the Independent doesn't use quotation marks.
Errr... well done? The Independent quotes both the coalition and rebel tv.

It does make me laugh that you believe the rebels in Yemen but not in Syria. The fact that the Houthi’s are sponsored by Iran speaks volumes about your stance.
 
I believe once again you’re talking out of your hoop: yemen Archives - bellingcat
Thank you for information.
I was not aware that Belligcat is interesting in Yemeni events.
Errr... well done? The Independent quotes both the coalition and rebel. It does make me laugh that you believe the rebels in Yemen but not in Syria.
Many times I told to Reuters paid collective that posts under @scalieback nick name that I don't believe anybody, any source. Only something that is confirmed by at least two independent sources could be regarded (with care) as something really happened.
In this case we have only single sources from both sides. But there is also a common sense. It suggests that 'most likely' they were air strikes. Though at this point it is only allegation.
The fact that the Houthi’s are sponsored by Iran speaks volumes about your stance.
And what is my stance?
My attitude to the Houthi's is quite neutral. Hardly one can be surprised that Iran supports its Shia brethren.
KSA and the Gulfies are interesting in stable Sunni dominated government in Yemen. The West ... of course supports ME despots and little dictators. Nothing special, business as usual.
 
Thank you for information.
I was not aware that Belligcat is interesting in Yemeni events.
That’d be you taking your blinkers off. It’d be interesting if you believe their investigations in Yemen but ignore them on MH17 etc
Many times I told to Reuters paid collective that posts under @scalieback nick name that I don't believe anybody, any source. Only something that is confirmed by at least two independent sources could be regarded (with care) as something really happened.
In this case we have only single sources from both sides. But there is also a common sense. It suggests that 'most likely' they were air strikes. Though at this point it is only allegation.
I always said your HOTO notes were pants. Examples such as you remembering whether you were ill or not? Have you posted on the dog thread yet?
And what is my stance?
My attitude to the Houthi's is quite neutral. Hardly one can be surprised that Iran supports its Shia brethren.
Of course. Iran is Russia’s current ally of choice and made amendments to UNSC Resolutions about Iranian supplies to the Houthi’s rather than get them to accede to current Resolutions.
KSA and the Gulfies are interesting in stable Sunni dominated government in Yemen.
The one above in the Resolution talking about political transition and tells the Houthi’s to give up on their attacks?
The West ... of course supports ME despots and little dictators.
Classic, from an inhabitant of the country that supports regimes like Assad’s, Iran’s and the DPRK let alone Hezbollah.
Nothing special, business as usual.
Indeed
 
(...) Many times I told to Reuters paid collective that posts under @scalieback nick name that I don't believe anybody, any source. Only something that is confirmed by at least two independent sources could be regarded (with care) as something really happened.
In this case we have only single sources from both sides. But there is also a common sense. It suggests that 'most likely' they were air strikes. Though at this point it is only allegation. (...)
I tried a simple experiment. I searched for airstrikes in Yemen on the CBC web site using Google and examined all the stories which came up on the first page of search results. In none of those cases did the Saudi coalition admit to conducting any of the air strikes when asked by the international press.

There have been numerous previous reports of Saudi coalition air strikes on schools, hospitals, and markets, killing thousands of civilians. Here's an example:
Saudi-led airstrikes kill 14 civilians in Yemen's capital | CBC News
The Saudi-led airstrikes have hit schools, hospitals and markets, killing thousands of civilians and prompting rights groups to accuse the coalition of war crimes.
If you go back in this thread a ways you will find previously posted stories from mainstream news media where there was concern being expressed about the potential for western military personnel being held accountable as accessories to war crimes due to the assistance they have been giving to the Saudi coalition in these events.

I can't say what happened in this particular instance, but if this was a Saudi coalition air strike it would have been one of many similar ones and so not exactly unprecedented nor in any way unusual in terms of how the war has been conducted so far.
 
More reports of Saudi air strikes killing large numbers of civilians.
Schoolchildren riding bus among dozens killed in Saudi airstrike in Yemen | CBC News
Saudi-led coalition airstrikes on Thursday killed dozens of people, including children travelling on a bus, in Yemen's Saada province, Yemeni medical sources and the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) said.
This report is unusual as in this case the Saudi coalition has responded to press inquiries and said that the air strike was justified and carried out in accordance with humanitarian law.
"Today's attack in Saada was a legitimate military operation ... and was carried out in accordance with international humanitarian law," the Arabic-language statement said.
The Red Cross said their medical team had received the bodies of 29 children killed in the incident.
The ICRC said on its Twitter account that its medical team at the ICRC-supported hospital in Saada had received the bodies of 29 children, all under 15 years old.
Apparently a school bus carrying children was hit by the attack.
Abdul-Ghani Sareeh, from the Saada health department, told Reuters: "A bus carrying children was targeted today while they were coming from summer school, resulting in 43 martyrs and almost 63 wounded."
 
Saudi-led coalition to investigate Yemen bus attack - SPA
Saudi led coalition say they'll investigate the alleged air strike that hit the school bus:
“The coalition is firmly committed to investigating all claims regarding mistakes or violations of international law, to sanction those who caused these incidents and to provide assistance to the victims,” the agency said, citing a coalition official.
Yemen's Houthis welcome U.N. call for investigation into air strikes
Houthi's welcome Guterres' call for an independent investigation into the air strike:
“We welcome the call of the secretary general (of the United Nations) and we are ready to cooperate,” the head of the Houthis’ supreme revolutionary committee, Mohammed Ali al-Houthi, said in a tweet.
UNICEF wondering whether this will be a turning point:
Henrietta Fore, executive director of the U.N. Children’s Fund UNICEF, said in a statement on Friday that the “horrific” bus attack “marks a low point in (Yemen’s) brutal war”.

“The question now is whether it will also be a turning point — the moment that must finally push the warring parties, UN Security Council and international community to do what’s right for children and bring an end to this conflict,” she added.
KSA has admitted previous airstrike mistakes as a quick google shows:
25.08.2017: Saudi Arabia admits Yemen air strike that killed 6 children was a ‘mistake’
08.10.2016: Saudi-led coalition admits to bombing Yemen funeral

Unlike some countries that is ..................
 
Foreign Secretary defends UK-Saudi ties
Foreign Secretary Jeremy Hunt has told the BBC that the UK's relationship with Saudi Arabia stops bombs going off on the streets of Britain.

Mr Hunt also said he was "deeply shocked" that at least 33 children were killed in rebel-held northern Yemen when an air strike by the Saudi-led coalition hit their school bus.
Jeremy Hunt defends UK-Saudi ties after children killed in Yemen bus blast
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn blasted the attack, saying UK support for the conflict must end.
...
Mr Corbyn said in the wake of the bus attack: “These children were slaughtered travelling back to school after a picnic.
“It is the latest atrocity in the Saudi-led war in Yemen, armed and backed by the UK government.
“UK support for this conflict, and the humanitarian crisis it's unleashed, must end.”
 
UN experts have said the governments of Saudi Arabia, the UAE, and Yemen may be responsible for war crimes including rape, torture, disappearances, "deprivation of the right to life", and recruiting children as soldiers in the course of the war in Yemen.
UN experts accuse Saudi Arabia, U.A.E. of war crimes in Yemen | CBC News
Three experts working for the UN's top human rights body say the governments of Yemen, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia may have been responsible for war crimes including rape, torture, disappearances and "deprivation of the right to life" during 3½ years of escalated fighting against rebels in Yemen.
"[We have] reasonable grounds to believe that the governments of Yemen, the United Arab Emirates and Saudi Arabia are responsible for human rights violations," the report said. It cited violations including unlawful deprivation of the right to life, arbitrary detention, rape, torture, enforced disappearances and child recruitment.
They have also described the Saudi coalition air strikes, which are the leading cause of death from the fighting.
The experts have also chronicled the damages from coalition air strikes, the single most lethal force in the fighting, over the last year.
They have asked the international community to refrain from supplying arms to the warring parties. This apparently was directed at the US, Britain, and Iran.
They urged the international community to "refrain from providing arms that could be used in the conflict" — an apparent reference to countries like the United States and Britain that help arm the Saudi-led coalition, as well as Iran, which the coalition has accused of arming the Houthis.
Last year Associated Press reported that the UAE and its allies were running secret prisons where they conducted torture and sexual abuse.
The Associated Press reported last year that the UAE and its allied militias were running a network of secret detention facilities, beyond the control of Yemeni government. In June, AP revealed that hundreds of detainees had been subjected to sexual abuse and torture.
The UN report also accused various rebel factions (there are multiple different ones apparently) of various human rights abuses, including arbitrary detention, torture, and recruitment of children.
The UN report accused the "de facto authorities" — an allusion to rebel leaders that control some of the country's most populated western and northern areas — of crimes including arbitrary detentions, torture and child recruitment. Human rights advocates have faulted the Houthis for laying land mines and targeting religious minorities and imprisoned opponents.
The UN previously declared Yemen to be the world's worst humanitarian crisis.
Since March last year, the UN's humanitarian aid agency has called Yemen the world's worst humanitarian crisis — with three-fourths of its population of over 20 million in need of humanitarian assistance. The war has devastated the country's health system and provided the breeding grounds for the world's largest cholera outbreak last year.
They also criticized the coalition's incident assessments explanations for civilian casualties of air strikes, saying that it lacked the independence and impartiality necessary to conduct impartial investigations.
They also sharply criticized work by the coalition's Joint Incidents Assessment Team, which was set up as a bulwark against possible rights violations. They questioned the JIAT's explanations for the air strikes that have killed civilians, and challenged its "independence and its ability to carry out impartial investigations."
The UN experts investigated nearly a dozen coalition air strikes and said they had serious questions about the targeting practices and said the coalition "routinely" failed to seek information about official lists of targets which should not be struck.
The experts also said nearly a dozen deadly airstrikes they investigated over the last year "raise serious questions about the targeting process applied by the coalition." They chastised some in-the-field coalition combatants for "routinely" failing to seek information about official "no-strike" lists that should have been avoided.
The news story was not specific about the above, but there have been numerous complaints from aid organizations about Saudi coalition air strikes on hospitals.

The UN Human Rights Council faced serious opposition to setting up the investigation into war crimes in Yemen. Saudi Arabia and their allies were successful in limiting the investigation. This investigation was due to a compromise reached last autumn.
Even getting the experts up and running was an accomplishment for the UN-backed Human Rights Council, which passed a resolution creating the team last September. Largely due to the objections of Saudi Arabia and its allies, the council failed several times to authorize more intrusive investigation into possible war crimes in Yemen. The 47-member body only last fall reached a compromise to bring in the experts.
The news story was not specific as to which allies of Saudi Arabia were influential enough to help hobble a war crimes investigation.
 
Saudi-led coalition admits deadly Yemen strike on bus was unjustified
Saudi led coalition have admitted the strike on the bus. Again, it appears to be a problem with the targeting and RoE. Time between the order, the strike and ‘no strike’ orders:
“There was a clear delay in preparing the fighter jet at the appropriate time and place, thus losing (the opportunity) to target this bus as a military target in an open area in order to avoid such collateral damage,” JIAT legal advisor Mansour Ahmed al-Mansour told reporters in the Saudi capital.

“The team believes that the coalition forces should immediately review the application of their rules of engagement to ensure compliance...” he added.
They’ve apologised and they will also hold accountable those responsible:
“The Joint Forces Command of the Coalition expresses regret over the mistakes, extends its sympathies, condolences and solidarity to the families of the victims,” said a statement carried by the Saudi state news agency SPA.
 
Yemen peace talks collapse in Geneva after Houthi no-show
Peace talks have collapsed in Geneva on Yemen. The blame game is coming from both sides with the Yemeni govt blaming the Houthi’s not turning up. The Houthi’s blame the coalition for setting conditions on their flight.

Griffiths the UN Special Envoy says (diplomatically) that the conditions for them attending weren’t quite correct;
“They would have liked to get here, we didn’t make conditions sufficiently correct to get them here,” Griffiths told a news conference, declining to elaborate.
The Houthi’s because the coalition obstructed the delegations flight:
“We all know that the talks collapsed because of the obstruction of the national delegation from leaving and traveling to Geneva by the coalition forces,” he said in a speech broadcast on the group’s al-Masirah TV.
The condition was apparently the Omani flight stopping in Djibouti for inspection by the coalition and they also wanted it to evacuate some of their wounded:
The Houthi group said they had wanted guarantees from the United Nations that their plane, supplied by Oman, would not have to stop in Djibouti for inspection by the Saudi-led coalition, after being “sequestrated” there last time for months by the Saudi-led military coalition. They also wanted the plane to evacuate some of their wounded to Oman or Europe.
Griffiths also said that not all of the constituencies had bought into the peace process and can’t see the potential results but doesn’t see it as a fundamental blockage to the process:
Griffiths said on Saturday that the restart of a peace process was “a very delicate, fragile moment”.

“People are coming at a time when perhaps all of their constituencies are not fully engaged and don’t see ahead of time results that will come out of talks,” he said.

“So I don’t take this as a fundamental blockage in the process.”
The Yemeni ForMin says the Houthi’s are irresponsible and ”trying to sabotage the negotiations”:
Yemeni Foreign Minister Khaled al-Yamani, who led the government delegation, accused the Houthis of being “totally irresponsible” and of “trying to sabotage the negotiations”.

“If they were sincere in reaching peace, they should have come, even if we were meeting in separate rooms,” he told a separate news conference before leaving the Swiss city.
They’re also blaming Griffiths for not being strong enough in making all parties attend:
Yamani also strongly criticized Griffiths, who took over as mediator in February.

“We want the U.N. to be firmer in bringing the other party to the negotiations,” he said.
UAE, members of the coalition, also blame the Houthi’s but believes a political solution is the only way forward:
Anwar Gargash, Minister of State for Foreign Affairs for the United Arab Emirates, a key member of the Saudi-led coalition of Sunni Arab states, tweeted: “Despite the serious setback in Geneva the way forward is still a political solution. What is perhaps clearer now to the international community is the unwillingness of the Houthis to engage in good faith with such a process.”
 
Saudi-led coalition masses troops near Yemen's Hodeidah as pressure mounts to end war | Reuters
Pressure from the US and the UK asking the Saudi's to call a halt to their Ops arising from the Khashoggi murder. Saudi is now massing their troops around the port of Hodeidah in an attempt to force the Houthi's to return to the UN sponsored peace talks:
The Saudi-led coalition has massed thousands of troops near Yemen’s main port city of Hodeidah, local military sources said on Wednesday, in a move to pressure Iranian-aligned Houthi insurgents to return to U.N.-sponsored peace talks.

The United States and Britain have called for an end to the 3-1/2-year war that has driven impoverished Yemen to the verge of famine, raising pressure on Saudi Arabia as it faces a global outcry over the murder of prominent Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul on Oct. 2.
These appear to be Yemeni soldiers rather than Saudi preparing for the assault:
“Thousands of Yemeni soldiers trained by the coalition have been sent to the outskirts of Hodeidah in addition to modern weaponry including armoured vehicles and tanks...in preparation for a big operation in coming days,” said one source.

Residents told Reuters that the Houthis had also deployed forces in the centre of Hodeidah city, at the port and in southern neighbourhoods in anticipation of an onslaught.
UN envoy praising the words of Pompeo and now the UK, hoping to bring all parties to the negotiating table:
Envoy Martin Griffiths welcomed a call by U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo on Tuesday for a cessation of hostilities ahead of U.N.-led negotiations scheduled to begin next month.

Britain also endorsed the U.S. call to end the fighting, which has killed more than 10,000 people, according to available U.N. figures, and triggered the world’s most urgent humanitarian crisis.

“We remain committed to bring the Yemeni parties to the negotiations table within a month. Dialogue remains the only path to reach an inclusive agreement,” Griffiths said in a statement issued on Wednesday.

“I urge all concerned parties to seize this opportunity to engage constructively with our current efforts to swiftly resume political consultations to agree on a framework for political negotiations, and confidence-building measures,” he said, listing support for the central bank and a prisoner swap.
 
The UN Secretary-General said that Yemen may face "the worst famine we have seen in decades". Yemen could face 'worst famine we have seen in decades,' UN chief says | CBC News
UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres warned Friday that Yemen could face "the worst famine we have seen in decades" and urged the country's warring parties to immediately halt the violence.
Another UN official said that famine in Yemen could come soon and be of enormous scale.
UN humanitarian chief Mark Lowcock warned last week that "there is a clear and present danger of an imminent and great big famine engulfing Yemen" that could affect 14 million people — half of the country's population.
 

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