Yemen

Spot on. Hypocrisy.

I intellectually understand the realpolitik reasons for our association with the Saudis, as pointed out by @Graculus

But I don't buy into the good guy bad guy stuff as I get the impression @scalieback does. Although I may be wrong in characterising him in such terms.

Different shades of grey
It’s not ‘good guy’ ‘bad guy’ at all. The hypocrisy is somebody who won’t condemn Assad’s use of CW or even the Russian/Syrian carpet bombing for example but is happy to criticise KSAs use of weapons bought from the West in their ‘little war’. Same on supplying weapons to the Houthi’s, ignored but ‘the West’ supplying KSA is bad.

KSA on the face of it look like they have made a mistake. I sincerely hope it is investigated and at the very least compensated and blame apportioned. The same should apply to Russian and Syrian claims in Syria. However, Russia still denies any civcas bizarrely. The Coalition in Syria and Iraq have had civcas. They investigate and if culpable admit guilt and compensate.

I’ve no problem with KSA held to task by the same posters who also criticise Russian and Syrian civcas. If they do not do both, that is hypocritical.

KSA clearly need help with their targeting. Perhaps ‘we’ should do something about that?
 
The level of hypocrisy is what the problem is. We in the west, or rather our governments, have painted ourselves into a corner by loudly declaiming that we are motivated solely by the purest of motives while our opponents do what they do out of evil and spite. In doing so we have cut out the middle ground we need to rein in our "allies" when they perpetrate their own excesses.

Having painted the world in black and white good versus evil terms, we can't criticise them without seriously undermining our justifications for continuing to support them and providing ammunition to those political factions who are campaigning to cut off all contact with them.

The naked hypocrisy is impossible to disguise and undermines our influence with other countries who recognise our foreign policy for what it is and move from being fence sitters to being actively suspicious of our motives.

If you go back to the very post which came immediately before the current string of posts, you can see the sort of problem which our faux moral selective outrage is causing us. https://www.arrse.co.uk/community/threads/yemen.222249/post-8478810

Our interest in reducing the level of Islamist terrorism and civil war in the world is being undermined by our association with a country who knows they can get away with pretty much whatever they want because we've left no middle ground in our black and white world.

As for the relative lack of reportage, I've outlined what I think are the major reasons. However, it is a bit naive I think to portray Western governments as passive actors in the news process. Where "we" have an interest in seeing something in the news we have foreign ministry press flacks handing out press releases, giving "anonymous source in the intelligence community" press briefings, inviting reporters to photo opportunities, and overall driving the press cycle in general. We also know that with most of the world's major news agencies being based in the political centres of the West, we can count on these stories getting global coverage. This isn't happening with Yemen, and it isn't happening because it isn't in our interests for it to happen.

Our faux sense of moral superiority is based on hypocrisy, and quite frankly it isn't fooling anyone except for those who desperately want to believe it. I have pointed out above why it is ultimately a self-defeating tactic, and we really ought to face up to that.
The West doesn't portray Syria as black and white barring, and this is the really important part, the use of chemical weapons.

The influence of the West is in decline anyway, what's happening in the regional proxy war with Iran in Yemen is part of its attempt to stem that, as will be continuing and future operations in Africa. Get used to it because it isn't going to change any time soon.

Plenty of news out there if you look, Peter Salisbury (@peterjsalisbury) | Twitter is a good follow as was Hisham Al-Omeisy (@omeisy) | Twitter until banged up by the Houthi, thankfully released now. The wedding bombing has been reported in all of the main papers but as with anything, it's in competition and bluntly, Assad wins on the bad guy stakes so sells more. Be interesting where the int came from though.

You might want to include the UAE in this as well as China.

How the UAE’s Chinese-Made Drone Is Changing the War in Yemen
 
A large funeral was held on Saturday for Saleh al-Samad, a high level Houthi official who was killed in a Saudi air strike last week. More Saudi airstrikes as Yemeni leader laid to rest | CBC News

There was a $20-million reward on Samand's head.
Al-Samad, who held the post of president in the Houthi-backed political body, was the most senior official to be killed by the Western-backed alliance, which had offered a $20-million US reward for any information that led to Samad's capture.
He was killed along with six others in an air strike on his car. A photo caption in the story describes the other six as his bodyguards.
He was killed April 19 along with six companions by an airstrike on his car in the coastal province of Hodeida.
In other news. Yemeni rebels claimed to have fired 8 ballistic missiles at the Saudi Arabian city of Jizan. The Saudis said they intercepted 4.
Elsewhere, Yemeni Shia rebels said they fired eight ballistic missiles at targets in Saudi Arabia's southern city of Jizan.

The Houthis said they launched eight ballistic missiles at "economic and vital targets" in Saudi's Jizan province on Saturday. Riyadh said it intercepted four of the projectiles.
There was nothing in the story which indicated what happened with the remaining 4 missiles.
 
It’s not ‘good guy’ ‘bad guy’ at all. The hypocrisy is somebody who won’t condemn Assad’s use of CW or even the Russian/Syrian carpet bombing for example but is happy to criticise KSAs use of weapons bought from the West in their ‘little war’. Same on supplying weapons to the Houthi’s, ignored but ‘the West’ supplying KSA is bad.

KSA on the face of it look like they have made a mistake. I sincerely hope it is investigated and at the very least compensated and blame apportioned. The same should apply to Russian and Syrian claims in Syria. However, Russia still denies any civcas bizarrely. The Coalition in Syria and Iraq have had civcas. They investigate and if culpable admit guilt and compensate.

I’ve no problem with KSA held to task by the same posters who also criticise Russian and Syrian civcas. If they do not do both, that is hypocritical.

KSA clearly need help with their targeting. Perhaps ‘we’ should do something about that?
I utterly condemn the use of CW by Assad... again for the record
 
For a few hundred years Arab has been killing Arab, they have just got bigger and better ways of doing it,
Having done a little time in the Gulf, long may the killing go on, which ever way they kill each other
is alright by me
 
Who is they?

You seem to be quick reaction 24/7 to inform us of outrages commited by our adversaries, so we can leave that up to you.
I usually only comment where I see that something hasn't been said.
Why come on a forum to parrot the opinion of others?
Yeah.
Why do you (in all of your personalities)?


Parrotting the opinion of others.
Original.....................................................................
 
Saudi man killed in missile salvo from Yemen
Another eight ballistic missiles fired at KSA. The Houthi’s seem to have an inexhaustible supply as Tehran denies supplying them. One man killed by ‘falling military debris’ albeit unknown if this was by Houthi missile or anti-missile defence:
Yemen’s Houthi movement fired ballistic missiles at what it called “economic and vital targets” in the southern Saudi province of Jizan on Saturday, and Saudi authorities said a man was killed by debris from the projectiles.

The attack appeared to be retaliation promised by Yemen’s dominant political faction in a war there as thousands attended a funeral in the Houthi-run capital Sanaa for a top Houthi official killed in a Saudi-led air strike last week.
Apparently it was in retaliation to the death of Samad:
In a televised speech, Houthi leader Abdul Malik al-Houthi vowed that the death of Samad — a relative moderate who helped oversee political and administrative duties while the Houthi military wing pursued fighting — would not split its ranks.

“They anticipated that this crime would break the spirit of the Yemeni people ... Our enemies have fantasized that the assassination of the president will lead to disagreements within the Ansarullah (Houthis). All this is a mirage and illusions.”
 
In other news. Yemeni rebels claimed to have fired 8 ballistic missiles at the Saudi Arabian city of Jizan.
But as ever the same people railing against Saudi "War crimes" followed by demands its evil western supporters cease aid and insinuate there's a ban on reporting unfavourably on Saudi, will now completely ignore the other factions deliberate targeting of Saudi civilians fail to demand its supporters cease and of course not complain about the perceived lack of coverage.

For Clarity - its not a swipe @Baglock - nor at any one else here although in hindsight 118 probably qualifies

Its not Baglock who posts endless West to blame for Yemen memes upon face ache - Western backed War crimes etc then completely ignores anything traced back to the perceived " good" guys (Russia Iran North Korea etc).

Edit to remove a bit of mong word duplication
 
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Saudi man killed in missile salvo from Yemen
Another eight ballistic missiles fired at KSA. The Houthi’s seem to have an inexhaustible supply as Tehran denies supplying them. One man killed by ‘falling military debris’ albeit unknown if this was by Houthi missile or anti-missile defence:

Apparently it was in retaliation to the death of Samad:
Probably component supply to enable them to convert SAMs and repair/mod any Frog, Scud and Tochka they have left.
 
The Yemeni Presidential Palace was levelled by Saudi air strikes leaving at least 6 dead and 30 wounded.
Yemen presidential palace levelled by Saudi airstrikes | CBC News
Airstrikes by the Saudi-led coalition fighting Yemen's Shia rebels targeted the presidential palace in the heart of the Yemeni capital on Monday, leaving at least six people dead and 30 wounded, according to health officials.
All the killed were civilians, according to officials. It is not clear from the news story as to what government these were officials of.
The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media, said the six killed were all civilians.
It is not known if there were any Houthis in the building(s).
It was not known if there were any Houthi rebel leaders inside the presidency at the time of the airstrikes in Sanaa and if there were any casualties among them.
The presidency building was flattened, and there was heavy damage to surrounding buildings in the busy Tahrir district of the city, including to a hotel. Pools of blood covered the pavement.
The three-floor presidency building was completely flattened, while surrounding buildings in the city's busy Tahrir district — including a famous five-star hotel — were heavily damaged. Cars were charred and pools of blood covered the pavement.
Many people are believed to be buried under rubble. It is not clear from the story, but from what was written it it possible that the casualty rate could be much higher than presently reported.
Many were believed to have been buried under the rubble.
Witness accounts describe numerous casualties amongst people in the area around the target, and damage to adjacent buildings, cars in the street, etc.
Witnesses described a scene of devastation. One resident said he saw bodies blown up before his eyes, a body thrown by the force of the blast against a shop and a car washer killed by shrapnel. The eyewitnesses spoke on condition of anonymity fearing reprisals.
A western NGO operating in Yemen condemned the air strike and violations of the laws of war.
The Norwegian Refugee Council, an aid group operating in Yemen, said it was "appalled by Saudi-led coalition strikes on a highly-populated business district in Sana'a earlier today."

"We abhor the ongoing use of violence to intimidate civilian populations under the guise of efforts to protect them. Yemeni people are not collateral. Adherence to the laws of war is not optional," Suze van Meegen, the group's acting country director, said in a statement.
The news story speculates that the air strike was targeted against a top Houthi leader, Mahdi al-Mashat. There is nothing in the story though which would indicate he was in the area.
Monday's airstrikes appeared to have targeted al-Sammad's successor, Mahdi al-Mashat.
 
The head of aid at the UN urged the Saudi coalition to expedite more food and fuel supplies, saying that an additional 10 million people in Yemen could face starvation by the end of the year.
UN issues another dire warning about Yemeni starvation risks | CBC News
The United Nations aid chief urged the Saudi-led military coalition that controls Yemen's ports to expedite imports of vital food and fuel supplies, warning that a further 10 million Yemenis could face starvation by year-end.
Yemen is the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with 8.4 million people already short of food and at risk of starvation.
Yemen is the world's worst humanitarian crisis with some 8.4 million people severely short of food and at risk of starvation.
The UN emergency relief coordinator said he was particularly concerned about food imports through the Red Sea ports.
"I am particularly concerned about the recent decline of commercial food imports through the Red Sea ports," Mark Lowcock, UN emergency relief co-ordinator, said in a statement read out to a Geneva briefing on Friday.
The Saudi coalition had imposed a food blockade on Yemeni ports. Yemen normally imports 90 percent of their food.
For several weeks at the end of last year, the Saudi coalition imposed a blockade on Yemeni ports which it said was to prevent Houthis from importing weapons. This had a severe impact on Yemen, which traditionally imports 90 per cent of its food.
Under international pressure the Saudi coalition lifted the blockade, but tightened ship inspections which has resulted in food imports still being well below normal levels.
Under international pressure the coalition lifted the blockade, but tightened ship inspections. Lowcock said commercial food and fuel imports remained "well short of pre-blockade averages."
Commercial shippers have lost confidence in their ability to ship food into Yemen because of Saudi coalition inspections of ships despite those ships having already been cleared by the UN.
"If conditions do not improve, a further 10 million people will fall into this category by the end of the year," he said. Confidence among commercial shippers has eroded due to delays, "including as a result of inspections undertaken by the Saudi-led coalition after these vessels have been cleared by UNVIM," Lowcock said, referring to a UN verification system.

Key supplies, including those necessary to deal with cholera remain on the coalition's prohibited list.
...triggered a major cholera outbreak that threatens to re-emerge with the ongoing rainy season.

Key supplies including some needed to combat the deadly water-borne disease, remain on the prohibited list of imports, Lowcock said.
 
Heavy fighting on the west coast has killed hundreds in recent days, as government forces advance on the port of Hodeida, through which much of Yemen's food and medicine arrives.
Heavy fighting on Yemen's west coast kills hundreds, threatens vital aid supply route | CBC News
Heavy fighting in Yemen between pro-government forces and Shia rebels has killed more than 600 people on both sides in recent days, security officials said Monday.

Government forces, backed by a Saudi-led coalition, have been advancing along the western coast in recent weeks as they battle the Iran-allied rebels, known as Houthis. The fighting has escalated as government forces close in on the Red Sea port city of Hodeida — a vital lifeline through which most of Yemen's food and medicine enters.
According to the UN, an attack on or siege of Hodeida could cost up to a quarter of a million lives.
A military attack or siege on the Houthi-held western city, long a target in the war, could cost up to 250,000 lives, a senior UN humanitarian official has warned.
More than 3 million people have been displaced by the fighting in this war, and the country is on the brink of famine.
The three-year stalemated war has killed more than 10,000 people and displaced more than three million. It has damaged Yemen's infrastructure, crippled its health system and pushed the Arab world's poorest country to the brink of famine.
The UN considers Yemen to be the world's worst humanitarian crisis.
The UN considers Yemen to be the world's worst humanitarian crisis, with more than 22.2 million people in need of assistance. Malnutrition, cholera and other diseases have killed or sickened thousands of civilians over the years.
 
Saudi coalition forces have begun an assault on the port of Hodeida.
Saudi-led forces begin assault on Yemen port city of Hodeida | CBC News
A Saudi-led coalition backing Yemen's exiled government began an assault Wednesday morning on Yemen's port city of Hodeida, a crucial battle in the three-year-old conflict that aid agencies warned could push the Arab world's poorest country into further chaos.
If the Houthis do not withdraw, this could result in street to street fighting and the first major urban combat for the Saudi coalition.
The battle for Hodeida, if the Houthis don't withdraw, also may mark the first major street-to-street urban fighting for the Saudi-led coalition, which can be deadly for both combatants and civilians alike.
Saudi government news channels said the battle had started. They also reported air strikes and shelling from naval vessels.
Saudi-owned satellite news channels and later state media announced the battle had begun, citing military sources. They also reported coalition airstrikes and shelling by naval ships.
The Houthi satellite news channel also said the offensive had begun, and claimed that the rebels had hit a Saudi coalition ship with two missiles.
The Houthi-run Al Masirah satellite news channel later acknowledged the offensive, claiming rebel forces hit a Saudi coalition ship near Hodeida with two missiles. Houthi forces have fired missiles at ships previously.

"The targeted ship was carrying troops prepared for a landing on the coast of Hodeida," the channel said.
The UN use Hodeida to bring humanitarian aid into Yemen. They have already pulled their personnel out of the port city ahead of the assault.
The UN and other aid groups already had pulled their international staff from Hodeida ahead of the rumoured assault.
The UN are looking at other options for bringing humanitarian aid to Yemen, but there are no details yet as to whether any practical alternatives have been found.
UN resident and humanitarian coordinator for Yemen Lise Grande, speaking by telephone from Sanaa, said that her office was drawing up options to ensure aid delivery to millions of Yemenis "in case of a possible siege of Hodeidah," including a humanitarian airlift.
Prior to the war, 70 percent of Yemen's food and fuel imports came in through Hodeidah.
Before the war, over 70 per cent of Yemen's food and fuel imports came through Hodeida, accounting for over 40 per cent of the nation's customs income.
The port is still vital for bringing in humanitarian aid. A Saudi air strike in 2015 destroyed dock cranes in the port, but the UN brought in mobile cranes to help unload ships.
The port remains crucial for incoming aid, food and medicine for a nation driven to the brink of famine by the conflict and a Saudi-led blockade. A Saudi-led airstrike in 2015 destroyed cranes at Hodeida. The United Nations in January shipped in mobile cranes to help unload ships there.
Approximately 600,000 people live in and around Hodeida.
The UN says some 600,000 people live in and around Hodeida, and "as many as 250,000 people may lose everything, even their lives," in the assault. Already, Yemeni security officials said some were fleeing the fighting.
The US continues to provide the Saudi coalition with assistance in the war, including aerial refuelling and intelligence used for targeting air strikes.
Defence Secretary Jim Mattis on Monday acknowledged the U.S. continues to provide support to the Saudi-led coalition.

"It's providing any intel, or anything we can give to show no-fire areas where there are civilians, where there's mosques, hospitals, that sort of thing — [and] aerial refuelling, so nobody feels like I've got to drop the bomb and get back now," he said.
 
More news on the fighting around the port city of Hodeida.
Saudi-led coalition makes gains in fighting south of key Yemeni port city Hodeida | CBC News

Saudi coalition forces took the town of Nakhila, about 20 km south of Hodeida airport.
Soldiers took the town of Nakhila in Yemen's ad-Durayhimi district, some 20 kilometres south of Hodeida International Airport, according to the government-run SABA news agency.
Columns of vehicles headed towards the city on Wednesday. The attack is part of operation "Golden Victory", and included airstrikes and shelling by naval ships.
Early on Wednesday, convoys of vehicles headed toward the rebel-held city as heavy gunfire rang out. The assault, part of an operation dubbed "Golden Victory," began with coalition airstrikes and shelling by naval ships, according to Saudi-owned satellite news channels and state media.
The plan appeared to involve a pincer movement. Approximately 2,000 troops were moved across the Red Sea from an UAE naval base in Eritrea. These will move in from the west when Hodeida's port is captured.
The initial battle plan appeared to involve a pincer movement. Some 2,000 troops who crossed the Red Sea from an Emirati naval base in the African nation of Eritrea were awaiting orders to move in from the west after Yemeni government forces seize Hodeida's port, Yemeni security officials said.
UAE forces together with Yemeni troops moved in from the south, while others cut off Hodeida from the east.
Emirati forces with Yemeni government troops moved in from the south near Hodeida's airport, while others sought to cut off Houthi supply lines to the east, the officials said. They spoke on condition of anonymity as they weren't authorized to brief journalists.

 
Saudi coalition forces have reached several of the entrances to the Hodeidah airport. Arab forces seize entrances to airport in Yemen's main port city | CBC News
Forces from an alliance of Arab states seized two entrances to the airport in Yemen's main port city on Friday ...
There are conflicting reports on how well the Saudi coalition advance is doing. The UAE claim resistance is crumbling. However, local sources say the Houthis have retired behind extensive minefields and it will take some time for the Saudi coalition to reach the main part of the airport.
The UAE state news agency said Houthi fighters at the airport were crumbling. However, local military sources said the Houthis have surrounded themselves with a large number of landmines, meaning that it would take some time for coalition forces to battle their way to the main airport buildings.
The Saudi coalition are gambling that they can capture the seaport quickly and not disrupt the flow of food and other aid to Yemen. The UN already considers Yemen to be the world's worst humanitarian crisis.
The assault is a gamble by the Arab states, who insist they can swiftly capture the port without major disruption to aid supplies in a country already experiencing the world's most pressing humanitarian crisis.
However, Hodeidah is a city of 600,000 people and this is the Saudi coalition's first attempt at capturing such a large and well defended city.
The coalition of Arab states has battled with little success for three years to defeat the Houthis, who control the capital Sanaa, the Hodeidah port and most of Yemen's populated areas. The assault on Hodeidah is the alliance's first attempt to capture such a well-defended major city.
(...)
Capturing Hodeidah would give the Arab coalition the upper hand in the war, in which it has fought since 2015 to restore an exiled government driven out by the Houthis. But a successful operation would require capturing a city of 600,000 people without inflicting damage that would destroy the port.
Western countries have backed the Saudi coalition's war in Yemen, but a humanitarian catastrophe could undermine that support.
Western countries have long given the Arab states tacit diplomatic backing and sell them billions of dollars a year in arms. But that support could falter if the assault provokes the feared humanitarian catastrophe.
 
French special forces on the ground in Yemen: Le Figaro
Allegedly French SF are in Yemen according to Le Figaro working alongside UAE Forces. Nothing from the French MoD. Apparently they’re not involved in the fighting for the port but the French have offered to help minesweep once (if?) the port is taken:
French special forces are present on the ground in Yemen with forces from the United Arab Emirates, French newspaper Le Figaro reported on Saturday, citing two military sources.

The newspaper gave no further information about their activities. The Defence Ministry was not immediately available for comment, but its usual policy is not to comment on special forces’ operations.
 
Saudi coalition troops have captured more of Hodeidah airport.
'They have stormed the airport': Yemen's war intensifies in Hodeidah | CBC News
Arab coalition troops stormed the airport in Yemen's main port Hodeidah on Tuesday and captured large areas of the compound in battles with Iran-aligned Houthis, a Yemeni military source, the UAE's news agency and local residents said.
UAE state news have said that large parts of the airport have been captured.
The UAE state news agency WAM said large swathes of the airport compound had been taken by coalition forces.
The UN estimate that in the worst case scenario the battles in and around Hodeidah could cost up to a quarter of a million lives.
UN officials estimate that 600,000 people live in and around Hodeidah and that in a worst-case scenario the battles could cost up to 250,000 lives.
 

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