Yank vs Brit medals

#1
I was just doing a bit of reading on the old wiki box, reading up on things such as mentions in dispatches (I really am that bored at work) and came across service medals.

Says here that the yanks give out a medal (the National Defense Service Medal) on completion of basic training.

This got me thinking, whenever I see yanks on TV (for example Veterans day) they are always covered in medals, where as the Brits seem a lot tighter when dishing them out, and you rarely see veterans with more than half a dozen on their chest come memorial day.

Is it just the case the Yanks like to stick the guys with hundreds of the things on TV a lot?
Are the Brits tight with them or are the Yanks just frivolous with them?

What is people’s opinion of this?

Up until now I assumed everyone with a medal of any kind had done some tours, worked hard and/or maybe even been singled out for bravery.

(Hope this section is ok; this seems to be at least close to gossip)
 
#2
The septics get ribbons for a lot of things, not all the ribbons have medals.
 
#3
I am not sure how true this is..... But when I was across the water, on a NI tour, we were told that US Forces would get a gong - just for flying over NI (As it was seen as an operational area!).
 
#4
The National Defense Service Medal is apparently awarded to all personnel of the US Armed Forces who are serving when Uncle Sam is involved in a war (happens a lot). Ohter medals are awarded to individual units and personnel on unit strength are entitled to wear that medal. There is also a marksmanship medal. The list goes on an on. Brits are a bit more reserved and less flashy.
 
#5
When waiting in a corridor idly perusing a poster depicting all the US ribbons and medals a number of years ago I saw that the USAF had a ribbon for what was essentially 'good admin' - no medal though.

Perhaps they get it for keeping a notebook and pen in the TLHP at all times?
 
#7
The Yanks get a medal for going overseas,they get 2 medals for not going overseas,just to make them feel better,or you can shop at the PX and mix and match the medals of your choice :D
 
#8
Warrior-Webbing said:
I am not sure how true this is..... But when I was across the water, on a NI tour, we were told that US Forces would get a gong - just for flying over NI (As it was seen as an operational area!).
Urban Myth. It is the 'Overseas Service Medal' and is a service award of the United States military which recognizes those service members who have performed military tours of duty outside the borders of the USA, ie Germany, Italy, UK etc....
 
#12
I was talking to a spam MP one day when I worked in SHAPE and he pointed to one of his ribbons and said thats for 5,000 miles safe driving and the bar is for 10,000 miles safe driving. Nearly spat my beer all over him
 
#14
scouse_scribes said:
I was talking to a spam MP one day when I worked in SHAPE and he pointed to one of his ribbons and said thats for 5,000 miles safe driving and the bar is for 10,000 miles safe driving. Nearly spat my beer all over him
What?

Please tell me there is nothing like this in the British Army! I don’t want to know one of my granddads medals is for a correct emergency stop, or impeccable mirror signal manoeuvre.
 
#15
What are the rules to get a Jubilee medal in the UK ? everytime I meet a brit serviceman and we discuss gongs he seems to be complaining about the fact he could not qualify for different reasons and/or that he can't wear foreign medals.
 
#16
Do they get a ribbon for correctly sorting all the ribbons they get? 8O
 
#19
fantassin said:
What are the rules to get a Jubilee medal in the UK ? everytime I meet a brit serviceman and we discuss gongs he seems to be complaining about the fact he could not qualify for different reasons and/or that he can't wear foreign medals.
To get a Jubilee medal you had to be involved in 'The Battle Of Jubilee'.
A lesser known campaign that lasted about 5 years.
 
#20
rockape34 said:
They used to get a ribbon, no medal, for admin (clean barrack rooms and the like) and a framed certificate, the idea being to promote order and cleanliness.
Never heard of that one, friend and I served for 29 years on active duty in the US Army. :? It's another urban myth. :lol:

There is a meaningless award though that was instituted by the Army in 1981 for officers and other ranks. It is called the Army Service Ribbon and all it means is that the person successfully completed basic training if enlisted or officer basic course for those in the officer corps. What a waste of yard goods in my view :roll: , but then I went through basic training back in the Stone Age (1971) and we didn't have such luxuries. :wink: Getting my stone axe to keep an edge was about all I could manage in those days. :salut:



I call this the Muppet Ribbon as it really doesn't mean anything.

ARMY SERVICE RIBBON

1. Description: The ribbon is 1 3/8 inches in width. It is composed of the following vertical stripes: 7/32 inch Scarlet 67111, 5/32 Orange 67110, 3/32 inch Golden Yellow 67104, 1/8 inch Emerald 67128, Ultramarine Blue 67118, 1/8 inch Emerald, 3/32 inch Golden Yellow, 5/32 inch Orange, and 7/32 inch Scarlet.

2. Components: Ribbon. MIL-D-11589/281. (There is no medal for this ribbon).

3. Criteria: a. The Army Service Ribbon is awarded to members of the Army, Army Reserve, and Army National Guard for successful completion of initial-entry training.

b. The Army Service Ribbon may be awarded retroactively to those personnel who completed the required training before August 1, 1981 provided they had an active Army status as defined above, on or after August 1, 1981. Only one award is authorized.

c. Officers will be awarded this ribbon upon successful completion of their basic/orientation or higher level course. Enlisted soldiers will be awarded the ribbon upon successful completion of their initial MOS producing course. Officer or Enlisted personnel assigned to a specialty, special skill identifier, or MOS based on civilian or other service acquired skills, will be awarded the ribbon upon honorable completion of four months active service.

4. Background: a. The Army Service ribbon was established on April 10, 1981, by the Secretary of the Army.

b. The Army Service ribbon is multi-colored to represent the entire spectrum of military specialties in which officers and enlisted soldiers may enter upon completion of their initial training.
 

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