WWII Defensive Pillboxes

greyfergie

MIA
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I didn't want to start another "My Favourite" thread - but this is similar. I've started to clock the amount of pillboxes still around and their locations and the unusual things people do with them. One of them sold recently for £55,000!

Down near me still eagerly guarding the entrance to the Severn Estuary is this one

Beachley Point Pillbox

This type 26 prefabricated pillbox has 4 loopholes and stands on a cliff at Beachley Point looking over the Severn Estuary. The pillbox formed part of the Western Command Stop Line No 27 which followed the line of the River Wye from its mouth, via Hereford, to Hay-on-Wye




There are websites dedicated to them.....

http://www.pillbox-study-group.org.uk/types-of-pillbox/
 
A few hidden in the valleys. One I can not find recorded on any of the sites dedicated to that sort of thing.
 

Dwarf

LE
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One on the Burnham & Berrow links defended my back from the inclement elements several times.
 
Can't move for them around here in the Camberley and Aldershot area.

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My Parents neighbours had one as their garden shed! Full of lawn mowers and hedge shears!
A Gwent bomb shelter? I'm aware of some in Newport by the old college campus. Local brick built and very solid. Now used as an excellent wine cellar for the one!

Problem with South Wales is seeing what is ex war building or ex mine building. Some of the mine construction buildings can be very well built to store explosives. They stop the explosion getting out, the war construction stopping the explosion getting in.
 
Northumberland Pillbox Photo Archive | The Pillbox Study Group Website.

Never really understood why they expended so much effort and resources defending the Northumberland coast as it isn't the ideal for invasion, too long a sail in a hostile environment. Also pillboxes in remote areas near Otterburn? If they got that far we were truly screwed.

ED. for fat fingers.
Might have something to do with this.
Tyne Stop Line - Wikipedia


Seems we did have a plan for fighting in the hills after all.
 

Dwarf

LE
Might have something to do with this.
Tyne Stop Line - Wikipedia


Seems we did have a plan for fighting in the hills after all.
Thanks for that, interesting reading especially as I am from there and my old school was quoted as a supply store, as was the Co-op which made me smile.

It's good to know that plans were made and it wouldn't all have been ad hoc. Though Newcastle would have taken a beating if they tried to fight through it, especially if the other bridges were down.

However I still can't see the North as a viable option unless the Jocks turned coats as it's difficult to supply with a rampaging RN about.

Mind we could always use elements of that plan next time Rangers play the Toon. ;)
 
However I still can't see the North as a viable option unless the Jocks turned coats as it's difficult to supply with a rampaging RN about.
Shame the Vikings didn't share your opinion ;)
 
Never really understood why they expended so much effort and resources defending the Northumberland coast as it isn't the ideal for invasion, too long a sail in a hostile environment.
I suppose the same could be said for Normandy...

Now, if I'd been preparing to invade Britain, I'd see two choices, Northumberland or East Anglia, these having beaches generally remote from centres of population and therefore less likely to be densely defended. I'd avoid cliffs, so that's the south coast and Yorkshire ruled out.

Invading East Anglia would involve a lot of mileage before achieving anything notable whereas rolling down from Northumberland would take out Vickers, shipbuilding and repair, coal mines, steel manufacturing and a host of other war effort manufacturing sites, all within a 60 mile push.
 
One near me disguised as a riverside boathouse with firing slits etc. They are everywhere on the Thames in Oxfordshire , by most bridges .
 
I recall a fair few along the river Crouch in the 70s.
Big flat area.
'Fight them on the landing grounds' etc etc etc.
Last time I was there I see the whole area was now a housing estate. Floodplain? naaah...
 
Theres a website which gives information Pictures
This one on the Usk with Newport Docks in the background.
 

Dwarf

LE
I suppose the same could be said for Normandy...

Now, if I'd been preparing to invade Britain, I'd see two choices, Northumberland or East Anglia, these having beaches generally remote from centres of population and therefore less likely to be densely defended. I'd avoid cliffs, so that's the south coast and Yorkshire ruled out.

Invading East Anglia would involve a lot of mileage before achieving anything notable whereas rolling down from Northumberland would take out Vickers, shipbuilding and repair, coal mines, steel manufacturing and a host of other war effort manufacturing sites, all within a 60 mile push.
I agree with your reasoning, there was a lot in Newcastle worth taking, though once done you have a long push down a narrow England with only a couple of corridors and some very inhospitable Yorkshire parts, and I'm not just talking about the farmers here, and it allows defences to be concentrated.
Then you arrive at the Manchester-Liverpool - Yorkshire urban areas and the Midlands beckon but it's a long haul.
I'd go for East Anglia, it allows you to deploy and then either push South to the capital, west to the Midlands manufacturing areas or NW to Manchester-Liverpool to cut the country in two.
Sea supply line is more defensible plus closer for air support which in the NE you would have to capture an airfield which essentially restricted you to Newcastle or Acklington.
Plus if you deploy and prepare to defeat the inevitable counter-attack you wouldn't have major urban centres to fight through causing delay and heavy casualties.
If you avoided Newcastle you lose the prizes that you mentioned plus you have to rebuild bridges and use minor roads as supply routes leaving a big bastionin your rear. If you fight through it it inevitably means a long struggle blunting your attack as the Newcastle-Gateshead urban area is quite a big one allowing a counter to be placed with the Scottish forces nagging at your rear.

Ed for spelling and missing a bit.
 
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