WWII AA site question

tiv

LE
The Clyde GDA also contained five batteries of the ultimate in AA gun defence from the Cold War, full automatic 5.25" guns firing at 18 rds/min - four of which survive. There are a lot of photos of the one at Stockiemuir here Stockiemuir | Canmore
 

mogreby

Clanker
Diver sites left little or no remains as they used a portable holdfast known as a Pile Portable Platform.

Typical Diver site at Southwold:

View attachment 495859

The Pile Platform used a matrix sleepers and railway track with a holdfast attached and buried in the ground, This is a model of one:

View attachment 495861
I know it says Southwold but in the background it looks an awful lot like Orford Castle and it doesn't look like the church tower at Southwold nor any other construction I can think of. Happy to be corrected.
 

tiv

LE
I know it says Southwold but in the background it looks an awful lot like Orford Castle and it doesn't look like the church tower at Southwold nor any other construction I can think of. Happy to be corrected.
Quite right, had a bit of brain fade there!
 
I don't suppose you'd do the same for me, please? I'm interested in the Tees 8 site, the southernmost one of the Teesside group.

The reason for this is that I stumbled on an obviously military (and largely concealed) site at the northwest corner of the North York Moors as I was coming toward the end of a very boring Lyke Wake Walk in 1974ish. I intended to revisit the area but never got round to it and now I don't expect that I ever will.

About 10 years ago, I dropped into a book-signing thing by someone on the Defence of Britain project so asked him if he was aware of the site. He was a bit non-committal and suggested that it was a Starfish site. This location didn't tally with recorded Starfish sites so I remain intrigued. Prior to forestation (that's forest-ation, not fore-station), this site would have had good views along the industrial Tees Valley to the north as well as along the area to the west of the Moors. I understand that this was along the route that bombers would have taken to reach West Yorkshire.
 

tiv

LE
I don't suppose you'd do the same for me, please? I'm interested in the Tees 8 site, the southernmost one of the Teesside group.

The reason for this is that I stumbled on an obviously military (and largely concealed) site at the northwest corner of the North York Moors as I was coming toward the end of a very boring Lyke Wake Walk in 1974ish. I intended to revisit the area but never got round to it and now I don't expect that I ever will.

About 10 years ago, I dropped into a book-signing thing by someone on the Defence of Britain project so asked him if he was aware of the site. He was a bit non-committal and suggested that it was a Starfish site. This location didn't tally with recorded Starfish sites so I remain intrigued. Prior to forestation (that's forest-ation, not fore-station), this site would have had good views along the industrial Tees Valley to the north as well as along the area to the west of the Moors. I understand that this was along the route that bombers would have taken to reach West Yorkshire.
The source of this information is AA Command by Colin Dobinson that unfortunately commands excessive prices second hand. I borrowed a copy from the library and copied the Gazetteer, all 26 pages of it. A few of the NGR's are a bit wonky but most get you there or thereabouts. In this case it only has letter references for the site, not number.

Another source is Historic England's Pastscape PastScape - information on England's archaeology and architecture but that uses letters as well: PastScape search results Page


Untitled-12.jpg
 
The source of this information is AA Command by Colin Dobinson that unfortunately commands excessive prices second hand. I borrowed a copy from the library and copied the Gazetteer, all 26 pages of it. A few of the NGR's are a bit wonky but most get you there or thereabouts. In this case it only has letter references for the site, not number.

Another source is Historic England's Pastscape PastScape - information on England's archaeology and architecture but that uses letters as well: PastScape search results Page


View attachment 496148
Many thanks for your efforts but all of these are miles from the site I'm looking for.

Not wasted effort though. I've now discovered that I used to live 50yds from Tees E, now the location of a pillar box. Oh how easy it is to get side-tracked. The same quest several years ago led me to a couple of crash sites (one with memorial) that I'd wandered past unknowingly many times in my youth.
 

tiv

LE
Many thanks for your efforts but all of these are miles from the site I'm looking for.

Not wasted effort though. I've now discovered that I used to live 50yds from Tees E, now the location of a pillar box. Oh how easy it is to get side-tracked. The same quest several years ago led me to a couple of crash sites (one with memorial) that I'd wandered past unknowingly many times in my youth.
Do you have a place name or NGR?
 
Do you have a place name or NGR?
Well, this is it. It's the middle of nowhere and I'm basing my locating skills on a 45 year old recollection. I'd estimate SE 462999. In a generally wooded area, more dense to the west (a lot of the trees in this area are post-war), the dense area being Arncliffe Wood. Cut into a rising hillside east of an unmetalled track but quite close to a summit. It looked as if it may once have been a small quarry but the excavations could have been specifically the result of creating the site.

It would be about 1km north or northwest of a place known locally as Sheep Wash but which appears on the map as Cod Beck Reservoir. That's about 600m east of Arncliffe Hall which can't be seen from anywhere near the site. It's about 2.5km north of Osmotherley, about 1km west of Scarth Nick.

I recall there being a few concrete bases with rusty bolts protruding and that my initial thoughts were that it could have been a searchlight site. I didn't bother to look more carefully as I just wanted to get to the end of what had been a miserable walk and intended to go back to have a proper rummage around.
 

tiv

LE
Well, this is it. It's the middle of nowhere and I'm basing my locating skills on a 45 year old recollection. I'd estimate SE 462999. In a generally wooded area, more dense to the west (a lot of the trees in this area are post-war), the dense area being Arncliffe Wood. Cut into a rising hillside east of an unmetalled track but quite close to a summit. It looked as if it may once have been a small quarry but the excavations could have been specifically the result of creating the site.

It would be about 1km north or northwest of a place known locally as Sheep Wash but which appears on the map as Cod Beck Reservoir. That's about 600m east of Arncliffe Hall which can't be seen from anywhere near the site. It's about 2.5km north of Osmotherley, about 1km west of Scarth Nick.

I recall there being a few concrete bases with rusty bolts protruding and that my initial thoughts were that it could have been a searchlight site. I didn't bother to look more carefully as I just wanted to get to the end of what had been a miserable walk and intended to go back to have a proper rummage around.
Well, there's this Pastscape - Detailed Result: HEAVY ANTI AIRCRAFT BATTERY DISHFORTH H1 though the NGR given (SE381721) puts it on the airfield. Whatever it was presumably a battery built to defend the airfield.

Screen Shot 2020-08-11 at 11.29.20.jpg
 
Well, there's this Pastscape - Detailed Result: HEAVY ANTI AIRCRAFT BATTERY DISHFORTH H1 though the NGR given (SE381721) puts it on the airfield. Whatever it was presumably a battery built to defend the airfield.

View attachment 496207
Increasingly, archaeological techniques of stratigraphy are needed. If I recall correctly, Dishforth has origins in World War I (probably no evidence left); A heavy bomber station in WWII (and bombed as well); post-war a fighter station and then repurposed as a key station in controlling the THOR ICBMs in the late 1950s. Then a domestic site for fighter controllers; a cadet training location and more recently, off road driver training for DST at Leaconfield. Each of these phases would have had their own force protection measures (eg Yarnald sangars in the early 1990s) AAA and field defences during WWII etc. And being in a state of perpetual pecuniary, old facilities are regularly repurposed.
 
The source of this information is AA Command by Colin Dobinson that unfortunately commands excessive prices second hand. I borrowed a copy from the library and copied the Gazetteer, all 26 pages of it. A few of the NGR's are a bit wonky but most get you there or thereabouts. In this case it only has letter references for the site, not number.

**SNIP**
Bücher.de indicates it is being reissued as a paperback at the end of the month.
 

W21A

LE
Book Reviewer
Any grid references for Wick in the north of Scotland?
 

HE117

LE
Not unlike Liberton, near Edinburgh. Secret Scotland - AA Battery Liberton

A later pic from Liberton attached below

Hoards of them; Map of Heavy Anti-Aircraft gun sites in England, Scotland and Wales
... Are you sure that photo is Stanedykehead? I lived just down the road from there and used to play in the AA battery site as a kid. I know Ferranti had a radar test site there in the 50s & 60s but I don't recognise the buildings at all..

Looks more like somewhere over Duddingstone direction!
 

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