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WWI German and British uniforms

NSP

LE
Yeah.

You haven't read the whole thread.

Have you.
Yeah, I have. Those are the records I don't read so well. I don't mind putting some time in to do something nice for a complete stranger but I'd rather not have to spend time trying to decipher stuff I'm not familiar with, only for some smartarse to say about the finished product: "Oh, that's very nice but you got this one tiny detail wrong" or "Your uniform is incorrect - it should be RGB code 123,321,123 not 123, 321,122."

This happens (although perhaps not to that pernickety level). Spin through the self-colourised thread...
 
Hello all.

I'm looking for some info on the uniforms in the photo below, to which there's a bit of a back story.

As you look at the photo, the guy front right is my paternal great-grandfather (Frederick Charles Auth), centre is my great-great-grandfather and front left is my great-uncle. They came as a family from Germany to Britain shortly before WWI for unknown reasons. The story is that at the outbreak of WWI my great-grandfather fought for the British cavalry and his brother fought for the German Navy. Family dinners must have been interesting.

Does anyone have any knowledge of the two uniforms in the photos? To me, my great-grandfather's cap badge looks like the Prince of Wales feathers.

View attachment 472052
Brodrick Cap, UK not kraut (unlike the royals of the same time)
 
It would seem that Charles Auth was a casualty during his service in S Africa-note, this could reference wounds or disease, with the former causing more 'casualties' than direct enemy action:

Charles Auth-Boer War Casualty.png


The original document is in Mormon Mountain,Utah - and I ain't going there, even digitally :cool:
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
Where do you all finding these records? Am I able to access them?

My family are fascinated by all this new information, especially as we all thought Albert was in the German Navy. We didn't know about Charles being in the Boer War either.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk
If you have the relevant info, you can search on the National Archives which are free at the moment.
 

soleil

War Hero
Where do you all finding these records? Am I able to access them?

My family are fascinated by all this new information, especially as we all thought Albert was in the German Navy. We didn't know about Charles being in the Boer War either.

Sent from my SM-G960F using Tapatalk

I wonder whether the family story comes from the fact that relatives still in Hessen may well have served in the German Navy.

I do my basic searches using my Ancestry UK membership, FBG.

When I'm looking at people during the First World War, I often start by finding them on the 1911 Census.

For people during the Second World War, I look for them on the 1939 Register of England and Wales.

Both are on Ancestry.

I supplement these with the occasional dip in Scotland's People.

I sometimes get in touch with local archives if I'm looking at something a bit tricky and need clarification about, say, the Electoral Register for an area.

PS As Joker says, the National Archives are offering free access to their digital holdings at the moment.

For your purposes, I would have a dabble on their website today and then consider whether you would like to subscribe to Ancestry after.
 
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@FatBoyGeorge - plus one for what @soleil said.

The thing about such research is that you will quickly realise that it is very much a case of 'less is more': in other words, start with the widest of parameters and see what trickles out.

In your case, the fairly unique surname of 'Auth' made this research fairly easy. However, be wary of commercial sites such as Ancestry, Find My Past, etc as they did not employ the brightest of document compilers :rolleyes:

Their interpretation of some of the more obscure British Army units will raise a smile.

As to my promise to put up the Service records for Charles, I'm having a bit of an issue with that as I can only 'Save' them within the Ancestry site: for some reason, they won't let me migrate them to my laptop.

However, if you do decide to hunt him down, you have more than enough info from the other stuff that has been posted. If you take out an Ancestry subscription, use this link Ancestry - Sign In which will take you to his 1901 Attestation papers.

If you're going the TNA route, you'll find the originals here - The National Archives; Kew, Surrey, England; WO 128 War Office: Imperial Yeomanry, Soldiers' Documents, South African War

Note the WO number as you'll need that for online research-also, make a note of his initial 1901 Service number as you may need to quote that also.

Good luck!
 

soleil

War Hero
Something which I found interesting about the family more broadly is that the Auths seem to have been a family of tailors - Edward, who came to the UK from Hessen, was a tailor/coatmaker and some of the children were tailors when they grew up, too.

They weren't just tailors, though, they were Soho tailors, living in Berwick Street in 1891, Rupert Street in 1901 and Meard Street in 1911.

If you walked from Regent Street to Tottenham Court Road, you would find these streets close together in Soho.

I've had a quick browse of some sources and get the impression that the German tailors in the area were considered to be very highly skilled.

This sounds like such an interesting project, it would be fascinating to create a little folder of what you know about the family and their place in the tailoring trade in Soho.
 

oldnotbold

War Hero
Once you have closed it down to a unit the regimental/corps museum is worth a punt as they often have diaries, memoirs or other materials relating to operations and collections of photos etc. County archives may hold something similar and local newspapers, way back when, gave extensive coverage of units going, local boy stories and welcome home parades.
 

AlienFTM

MIA
Book Reviewer
County archives may hold something similar and local newspapers, way back w
County archives may also hold their county regiment War Diaries. Doing my family history in the 2000s in Durham Archive Office, I stumbled across a microfiche of the War Diary of a DLI battalion in the line overlooking Villers Bocage and describing a sudden influx of casualties. Sadly at this point Zero Alpha realised I'd gone quiet and dragged me back on track.
 
Worth mentioning that 15th and 15th/19th wore similar chain mail. I did have a book of uniforms but don't know where it is. The book specified the origin of the 15th's mail. Possibly an Austrian connection.

The 10H were known as the 'chainy tenth' on account of their ornate cartouche belts, not their mail epaulettes (shoulder chains). Several British and Indian cavalry regiments wore mail.
 

NSP

LE
Hello all.

I'm looking for some info on the uniforms in the photo below, to which there's a bit of a back story.

As you look at the photo, the guy front right is my paternal great-grandfather (Frederick Charles Auth), centre is my great-great-grandfather and front left is my great-uncle. They came as a family from Germany to Britain shortly before WWI for unknown reasons. The story is that at the outbreak of WWI my great-grandfather fought for the British cavalry and his brother fought for the German Navy. Family dinners must have been interesting.

Does anyone have any knowledge of the two uniforms in the photos? To me, my great-grandfather's cap badge looks like the Prince of Wales feathers.

View attachment 472052
Could be an interesting project for @NSP s colouring thread.

Anyone...? The ringed thing: what's it called, so I can Google Image it? It doesn't look like a regular epaulette with dangly braid. I've seen similar on musicians and the like but can't remember what they are called. I've got a mental image of something in red and white candystripe...?

IMG-20200508-WA0017.jpg
 
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The 10H were known as the 'chainy tenth' on account of their ornate cartouche belts, not their mail epaulettes (shoulder chains). Several British and Indian cavalry regiments wore mail.
That would tie in with GMF serving first in India then up country when retaking Burma. Amazing what you learn when you listen to older soldiers

Great thread btw, some really fascinating information cheers gents
 
Black boots. Red tunic. QSA ribbon. For the cav bloke the FS cap for 3DG is a yellow crown with blue folds. It looks darker, but the tones reverse in old photos. It's not a 10H cap as they were all red. I can't think what else it could be.
 
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NSP

LE
And something similar to PoW feathers in the capbadge...?

017.jpg





 

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