WWFE (Worst War Film Ever)

the black steward suddenly is a fully qualified submariner,
If I'm not mistaken, in WW II the Navy was not allowing black sailors on submarine duty in any rate other than as steward. They could have allowed them to be cooks too I suppose. Maybe the guy in U571 was a disgraced Special Forces operative like Steven Segal in "Under Siege," (Also a bad movie, but the martial arts BS is a joy to behold.)


Steven Segal.jpg
 

NSP

LE
If I'm not mistaken, in WW II the Navy was not allowing black sailors on submarine duty in any rate other than as steward. They could have allowed them to be cooks too I suppose. Maybe the guy in U571 was a disgraced Special Forces operative like Steven Segal in "Under Siege," (Also a bad movie, but the martial arts BS is a joy to behold.)


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According to the history track on the DVD extras (where they acknowledge the Bulldog actuality) they say that steward on a sub' was a sought-after position for black sailors as it meant they got the same training as the rest of crew on an equal footing and thus the same rate, because on a sub' everyone was trained to a basic level in everyone else's job so as to fill in in the event of injury or illness on a patrol - i.e. a black man on sub's, although primarily a steward, received technical and trade training (and the attendant rate and pay) that would give him an advantage once discharged.
 
If I'm not mistaken, in WW II the Navy was not allowing black sailors on submarine duty in any rate other than as steward. They could have allowed them to be cooks too I suppose. Maybe the guy in U571 was a disgraced Special Forces operative like Steven Segal in "Under Siege," (Also a bad movie, but the martial arts BS is a joy to behold.)


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WW2 Submariners had to be qualified to operate any part of the submarine due to lack of human resources aboard regardless of their colour. He could have been a duty watch stander or something else depending on his area of operations despite being listed as a steward only.

EDIT: Apparently all submarine cooks had to be qualified in other areas.

I've read a lot about WW2 submariners, they were often described as a tight knit group due to the cramped quarters and that they had to figure out disagreements pretty quickly due to lack of ability to walk anymore than 75 metres away from the person you dislike and the possibility of being stuck next to that person on watch for a few hours at a time.



 
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According to the history track on the DVD extras (where they acknowledge the Bulldog actuality) they say that steward on a sub' was a sought-after position for black sailors as it meant they got the same training as the rest of crew on an equal footing and thus the same rate, because on a sub' everyone was trained to a basic level in everyone else's job so as to fill in in the event of injury or illness on a patrol - i.e. a black man on sub's, although primarily a steward, received technical and trade training (and the attendant rate and pay) that would give him an advantage once discharged.
That is correct. A black man in those days might be restricted to a steward's rate, but in order to hold a billet in a sub, he still has to undergo basic training in certain duties for submarine duty. And the money wasn't bad for the time either.
 

jg505

Old-Salt
If I'm not mistaken, in WW II the Navy was not allowing black sailors on submarine duty in any rate other than as steward. They could have allowed them to be cooks too I suppose. Maybe the guy in U571 was a disgraced Special Forces operative like Steven Segal in "Under Siege," (Also a bad movie, but the martial arts BS is a joy to behold.)


View attachment 494395
Seagal's martial arts skills are legendary, 7th Dan black belt in Aikido. But the one thing I remember most from Under Siege was Erica Eleniak popping out of the cake........ :)
 
Seagal's martial arts skills are legendary, 7th Dan black belt in Aikido. But the one thing I remember most from Under Siege was Erica Eleniak popping out of the cake........ :)
Well worth watching the directors cut for that
 
''Sink the Bismarck'' never mentions it was a US pilot Ens Leonard B Smith flying a PBY from 209 Sqn who found Bismarck.
That was probably guided there thanks to Enigma.

Bismarck was found thanks to cracking the Enigma code, then an aircraft would be sent to the area to then have "found it by chance" so Germany would always think it was down to lucky reconnaissance and not Enigma being read.

 

syrup

LE
My bold. I Haven't seen the latest midway film yet, so I cannot say. The longest day 1962. Knowing what I know now, I would say that 95% of that film is accurate, discounting some overacting by some of the main stars. Small cameos, the beach masters dog, the Nazi officer with his boots on the wrong feet, the Para hung up on the church tower, and Pipe major Millin, coming ashore playing the pipes, all included, and I believe all true.

Aided by the fact that many of the actors had actually served and some most notably Richard Todd had actually been there on the day.
Donald Pleasance while filming the Great Escape pointed out to the directors a few inaccuracies with the camp.
The director reportedly blew his top and told him to wind his neck in and what did he know about film making.
Richard Attenbourgh pointed out that Donald Pleasance had been a gunner on a Lancaster and was shot down and ended up in a stalag.
Cue apology and new role as technical advisor.
 

Tuffty

War Hero
What was that film about an American Bomb Disposal Team in Iraq, Utter shite. Full Metal Jacket, once you get past the bit about boot camp its all shite as well
 
Ok, The Longest Day.

The "Ruperts" looked nothing like as shown in the film.


The ranger assault on Pointe du Hoc. The guns they went to destroy were just a kilometre inland, the rangers found them and disabled them the same day. The film suggests their involvement was pointless.

Engineers are seen removing explosives from the Orne bridge. They hadn't been placed there but it was added for "drama."

The beach masters dog was a German Shepherd in reality, it was changed to a British Bulldog in the film, Obvious as to why.

Also something that does rankle with me. The playing up of the French attack at D-Day.

156,000 landed at D-Day. 73,000 American, 61,700 British, and French 177, Not 177 Divisions or Brigades but 177. 0.1% of the invading army. Yet those "177" get a prominent role in the film.

The film was made in 1962, De-Gaulle was still alive. Churchill said that" The heaviest cross I have to bare, is the cross of Loraine". During the lead up to D-Day, De-Gaulle was a constant irritation for Churchill and Eisenhower, and I can only assume that as both were alive when the film was being made, that the producers did not want any diplomatic problems with the French that would impact on Churchill and the British government, and so, the French were given more screen time than was appropriate with their involvement of D-day.. ..Only a theory, I stand to be corrected.
 
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If anyone has a problem with The Longest Day it's to do with the Canadians being totally ignored. I'd interested to know why ? There wasn't too many Canadian born movie stars around until Donald Sutherland but how difficult is it to hire an American to mispronounce the word "Aboot" ?

But a strange irony the Canadian airborne forces adopted TLD theme as their anthem
 
There wasn't too many Canadian born movie stars around until Donald Sutherland but how difficult is it to hire an American to mispronounce the word "About" ?
FOC

You need an English actor to do it properly though judging by recent productions.
 

syrup

LE
FOC

You need an English actor to do it properly though judging by recent productions.

Judging by recent productions all the English actors would be manning the German positions.
With some belting cheese to speak and either posh or Dick Van Dyke accents for other ranks

"I say Yank your way to brave for me and my men we surrender"
"Gor blimey Gov'nor you beat us ands down so you did luv a duck"
 

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