WWFE (Worst War Film Ever)

US Senator Strom Thurmond served in the 82nd Airborne at Normandy at age 41 coming in by Glider (319th FA).

Father and Son 506th PIR
Robert T. Frederick youngest 1 star at 37 in 1944 At 37 years of age. The youngest general to command a division-size unit in World War II . That’s him on the right As a Col briefing the old Generals. Notice his 1st Special Service fighting knife.

On a trip to the US a policeman stopped him and asked to see his ID . The policeman did not believe someone looking so young could be a General.

Frederick took umbrage and punched his lights out.

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Bodenplatte

Old-Salt
Jumpin' Jim Gavin 82nd Airborne was a one star at age 36.

That's Mark Clark with 3 stars and Geoffrey Keyes with 2. Any idea who the others are ?
 
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Robert T. Frederick youngest 1 star at 37 in 1944 At 37 years of age. That’s him on the right As a Maj briefing the old Generals. Notice his 1st Special Service fighting knife.

On a trip to the US a policeman stopped him and asked to see his ID . The policeman did not believe someone looking so young could be a General.

Frederick took umbrage and punched his lights out.

View attachment 474925
In Fredericks case the San Francisco Cop took his Army ID card and then threw it on the ground, which precipitated Frederick punching the officers lights out.

Gavin was also young for a G.O. at 37 and the Youngest LTG (3*) post war

By the way Mark Clark is considered the Youngest US general (4*)@ 49

40th Division had a 32 year old Brigadier general in 1952 during the Korean war BG Ott who was discharged in 46 as a light colonel from the regulars
 
In Fredericks case the San Francisco Cop took his Army ID card and then threw it on the ground, which precipitated Frederick punching the officers lights out.

Gavin was also young for a G.O. at 37 and the Youngest LTG (3*) post war

By the way Mark Clark is considered the Youngest US general (4*)@ 49

40th Division had a 32 year old Brigadier general in 1952 during the Korean war BG Ott who was discharged in 46 as a light colonel from the regulars
Youngest British 1 stars in WWII were about 32-33.




And in WWI it was 25.

 

riksavage

Old-Salt
Robert T. Frederick youngest 1 star at 37 in 1944 At 37 years of age. The youngest general to command a division-size unit in World War II . That’s him on the right As a Col briefing the old Generals. Notice his 1st Special Service fighting knife.

On a trip to the US a policeman stopped him and asked to see his ID . The policeman did not believe someone looking so young could be a General.

Frederick took umbrage and punched his lights out.

View attachment 474925
I met Strom Thurmond in 1997 in Washington DC. A serving US military friend of mine was a lobbyist at Capital Hill. He in turn introduced me to one of Strom’s interns (A mandarin speaking China expert). I visited Strom’s office (PA’s office, which led to his inner sanctum); wood panelled setting with a framed picture containing his medals and folded US flag. All the other pictures were of him and beautiful young women (one contained a bevy of cheerleaders). At the time I lived in HK and spent time in Shanghai. I met Strom very briefly, he asked me what I thought of the sneaky ‘Chi-Comm’s’
 
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A mention in passing for 'Attack on the Iron Coast' - a cheap-looking re-hash of the St Nazaire raid, filmed in St Katherine's Dock, London. I think I saw and enjoyed it as a child but it is now unwatchable.
'The Gift Horse' was an earlier and ok-ish version of the story, but surely the raid is worth a decent big screen version?
It was a double bill feature at the cinema with Yellow Submarine (assuming wiki is correct)
 
12 Strong. A FAC who needs to get danger close to call in a B52 airstrike because calling in the first strike from a klick away meant it was inaccurate! The book was spot, this film lasted 30 minutes.
 
To make up for that, it adds major errors of detail like the lighter-than-air Spitfire
They could glide for miles.


The answer to whether that glide really is feasible is, as is often the case, yes and no. The official pilot notes for the Mark 1 indicate that spitfires can achieve “long distance gliding”, but only if the plane is travelling at around 120 miles an hour before the engine cuts out. If the plane is travelling too fast before the engine stops turning the rotors it will spin out of control. If it is going too slowly it won’t glide very far. The distance travelled is also dependent on how flat and straight the descent is.

There aren’t many real life examples of Spitfires gliding without engines, but Martin Bowman’s book RAF Pilots in WWII does note a Spitfire pilot who glided for over 15 miles with a damaged engine. The beaches of Dunkirk are just over 10 miles long so in theory Hardy could have made it all the way along the beach's length without his engines..



Not really. Veterans reported gliding their Spitfires 15 miles or more.
 
They've shown 'Anzio' starring Robert Mitchum a couple of times recently on Freeview. While not a particularly good film, I've seen much worse.

But.... the music! This loud, blaring theme that pops up throughout the film. It's distracting, overpowering and completely out of place for the movie or the time in which the film is set.

The film was made in 1968, so that might have had something to do with it.
 
Just enjoyed 'The Kings Choice' but have to say the crass dripping septic shite that is Saving Private Ryan gets my goat. Everyone knows anniversary porn like Pearl Harbour is shite, but people try to tell me how the SPR 'really took me to the battlefied!' - A ******* 42 year old captain still on commando ops? Eclipsed only by Ted Danson's grey haired fifty three year old paratrooper and Paul Giamati weighing in at 230lbs minus reserve chute. It's a re-enactment troupe.
Numerous errors with it.

1. The beach used was Curracloe beach in Ireland. It is much shorter than the real one. In real life your run while under fire would have been 800 metres.

2. In real life the third wave of troops pushed inland. Tom Hanks seemed to have been in the first wave and in 20 minutes he's lead the advance in land when in real life it was three hours.

3. In real life it was UK crews and UK LCA landing craft taking US troops. There were no UK landing craft available now in large numbers but there was US LCM and LCVP types. They could still have had UK crews crewing them but then it was thought that would also look wrong.

4. The whole idea that in the middle of D-Day, an offensive that could have gone horribly wrong with massive consequences for the war, Europe and the world onwards and the guys at the top are taking time out to worry about the life of one guy?

5. A small bunch of guys are going to wander round German occupied France with the hope they might just run into Ryan? How does that even work? He could have literally been anywhere in the Northern France area, and the place was crawling with enemy troops and armour.

6. Snipers didn't use church towers. It was well known they could be used for sniping or reconnaissance so they were targeted from afar. A German tank would have immediately taken it out on approach.

7. The military jargon is actually from Vietnam as the films military advisor was from Vietnam (Dale Dye).


8. The German soldiers were deliberately given a buzz cut, to "look like Nazis." In real life they wore hair 1-2 inches long.

9. The 2nd SS Panzer Division wasn't in the area until late June. The 17th SS Panzergrenadier Division was there, but they had smaller armour like Panzer IVs and not Tigers or similar.
 
Back in the 1960s and 1970s there were a handful or films about the war in the Western Desert, usually with a Septic with white knees telling the Brits how to do it properly. I think there was also a TV series (the Rat Patrol?) in the same vein.
 

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