WW2 Soviet Navy "special additions" Rations

TheAssassin

War Hero
Reading an article about WW2 Soviet Rations and a paragraph about the submariners having an addition to their usual ration as a compensation to lack of oxygen and to help prevent scurvy. Do/did our Navy have anything similar (reasons or additions)?

The paragraph from article
Submariners also had special additions to their diet: red wine, sauerkraut, salted cucumbers and raw onions. These foods were supposed to prevent scurvy and compensated for the shortage of oxygen on board. Sailors received rusks. Small vessels could bake bread on shore, and large ships had special stoves. Towards the end of the war the food situation worsened, so rations were cut.
 
Reading an article about WW2 Soviet Rations and a paragraph about the submariners having an addition to their usual ration as a compensation to lack of oxygen and to help prevent scurvy. Do/did our Navy have anything similar (reasons or additions)?

The paragraph from article
Submariners also had special additions to their diet: red wine, sauerkraut, salted cucumbers and raw onions. These foods were supposed to prevent scurvy and compensated for the shortage of oxygen on board. Sailors received rusks. Small vessels could bake bread on shore, and large ships had special stoves. Towards the end of the war the food situation worsened, so rations were cut.
I would surmise a lack of oxygen would be a serious issue for crew effectiveness and cannot figure out how sauerkraut or the other items would improve that
 
I would surmise a lack of oxygen would be a serious issue for crew effectiveness and cannot figure out how sauerkraut or the other items would improve that
Subs crewed by methane breathing life forms from Phloxion 32-K?
 
I would surmise a lack of oxygen would be a serious issue for crew effectiveness and cannot figure out how sauerkraut or the other items would improve that
The best way to conserve oxygen is to reduce the amount of energy the body uses. Lounging about, or better still sleeping is one good way of doing this, which red wine probably helps with.

The sauerkraut is, at a guess, purely to ward off scurvy, and because it's preserved will last.
 

4(T)

LE
Reading an article about WW2 Soviet Rations and a paragraph about the submariners having an addition to their usual ration as a compensation to lack of oxygen and to help prevent scurvy. Do/did our Navy have anything similar (reasons or additions)?

The paragraph from article
Submariners also had special additions to their diet: red wine, sauerkraut, salted cucumbers and raw onions. These foods were supposed to prevent scurvy and compensated for the shortage of oxygen on board. Sailors received rusks. Small vessels could bake bread on shore, and large ships had special stoves. Towards the end of the war the food situation worsened, so rations were cut.

Even today Russian medical practice still includes beliefs and remedies that are unchanged from village folk lore. It would be entirely plausible back in 1940s that pickled cabbage was issued to counter-act carbon monoxide poisoning or something. If you die, obviously you didn't eat enough cabbage or rub your ears with onion, etc.
 
You may sniff at sauerkraut and pickled veg, but in addition to preserving it, the fermenting process is a very good way of getting the vitamins and nutrients out of the raw veg. So in the era before vacuum packing and freezing it would have been a very good addition to any rations, tinned otherwise:


And mum (bless her long departed soul) made a lovely sauerkraut dish which had cured meats or sausage as well as mushrooms and caraway seeds mixed in. Lovely.
 
I read an interesting book a while ago, mainly about how the Germans used different drugs throughout the course of the Second World War to try and enhance the ability of their armed forces.

Had varying degrees of success and failure.

Was an interesting section about submariners that went disastrously wrong. Something along the lines of getting the crews of those mini subs off their tits on some howling concoction of something similar to meth amphetamine, and sending them out on a mission.

Got totally disorientated at sea. Lost all track of reality. Sailed back in to one of their own ports and surrendered to their own side.

Book was called Blitzed or Blitzkrieged or something like that.

Well worth a read.
 
I read an interesting book a while ago, mainly about how the Germans used different drugs throughout the course of the Second World War to try and enhance the ability of their armed forces.

Had varying degrees of success and failure.

Was an interesting section about submariners that went disastrously wrong. Something along the lines of getting the crews of those mini subs off their tits on some howling concoction of something similar to meth amphetamine, and sending them out on a mission.

Got totally disorientated at sea. Lost all track of reality. Sailed back in to one of their own ports and surrendered to their own side.

Book was called Blitzed or Blitzkrieged or something like that.

Well worth a read.
i've woken up to some fairly uncomfortable conversations in the morning but even i would struggle to talk my way out of that one
 
Even today Russian medical practice still includes beliefs and remedies that are unchanged from village folk lore. It would be entirely plausible back in 1940s that pickled cabbage was issued to counter-act carbon monoxide poisoning or something. If you die, obviously you didn't eat enough cabbage or rub your ears with onion, etc.
Pickled cabbage 'Saurkraut', is an excellent food that prevents scurvy.
 

exsniffer

Old-Salt
Captain Cook issued his crew with sauerkraut rather than the usual limes to the vitamin C that prevented scurvy
 
I read an interesting book a while ago, mainly about how the Germans used different drugs throughout the course of the Second World War to try and enhance the ability of their armed forces.

Had varying degrees of success and failure.

Was an interesting section about submariners that went disastrously wrong. Something along the lines of getting the crews of those mini subs off their tits on some howling concoction of something similar to meth amphetamine, and sending them out on a mission.

Got totally disorientated at sea. Lost all track of reality. Sailed back in to one of their own ports and surrendered to their own side.

Book was called Blitzed or Blitzkrieged or something like that.

Well worth a read.
 

gorillaguts981

War Hero
The Rooskis had stuff called 'Doctor's Sausage' that could be prescribed for "patients who have had their health weakened by the Civil War and tsarist despotism.” A euphemism for yet another bloody crop failure.
 

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