WW2 Motor Gunboats (MGB)

Goatman

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Book Reviewer
Having worked in Gosport, I was loosely aware of the history of HMS Hornet, which sits next to the Submarine Museum.

Hornet , now best known as the Joint Services Sail Training Centre, was the shore-base from which a large proportion of WWII Coastal Forces effort was mounted.

Came across this on YouTube, thought it might be of interest to Arssers whose forebears crewed these vessels.


 
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Goatman

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Book Reviewer
Thanks, I'll see if I can find a copy.

I think the larger gun on the foredeck is one of these, equipped with an autoloader.

Britain Vickers 3-pdr (1.4 kg) [1.85"/50 (47 mm)] QF Marks I and II - NavWeaps - looks late Edwardian :)

MisterBoatMagazine guy seemed a little dismissive of the side-mounted twin Lewis guns.....but they were a notoriously accurate weapon ashore, which is why the SAS jeeps mounted them.

1587218077584.png


(I suspect in the AA role their primary purpose was to boost the crew's morale)


The boat which has been refurbished is one of the 'short' type.....later MTB's ( so designated regardless of their role ) were 115 feet overall.

Hazy memory tells me that some of the later MGB/MTBs were equipped with Quad MG mounts aft (?).
( this may be a Hollywood induced hallucination. )
 
Thanks, I'll see if I can find a copy.

I think the larger gun on the foredeck is one of these, equipped with an autoloader.

Britain Vickers 3-pdr (1.4 kg) [1.85"/50 (47 mm)] QF Marks I and II - NavWeaps - looks late Edwardian :)

MisterBoatMagazine guy seemed a little dismissive of the side-mounted twin Lewis guns.....but they were a notoriously accurate weapon ashore, which is why the SAS jeeps mounted them.

View attachment 466765

(I suspect in the AA role their primary purpose was to boost the crew's morale)


The boat which has been refurbished is one of the 'short' type.....later MTB's ( so designated regardless of their role ) were 115 feet overall.

Hazy memory tells me that some of the later MGB/MTBs were equipped with Quad MG mounts aft (?).
( this may be a Hollywood induced hallucination. )
Didn't the SAS jeeps carry twin Vickers K? Not Lewis guns.
 

rampant

LE
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Goatman

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Book Reviewer
there y'go....Arrse nollidge once again comes the rescue of the OP :)

I spent a short while at sea in a 22 Metre patrol boat ...coastal passage between HMS Vernon and Poole. It did a mere 25 kts.

God knows what doing 30 plus knots , in the dark, off a hostile coast was like.
 
Fun.

And terrifying.

If I were to guess.
 
God knows what doing 30 plus knots , in the dark, off a hostile coast was like.
I reckon it was pant shittingly exhilarating.
 
Having worked in Gosport, I was loosely aware of the history of HMS Hornet, which sits next to the Submarine Museum.

Hornet , now best known as the Joint Services Sail Training Centre, was the shore-base from which a large proportion of WWII Coastal Forces effort was mounted.

Came across this on YouTube, thought it might be of interest to Arssers whose forebears crewed these vessels.


Try this thread for another book on the subject:

 
This is a subject I’d like to know a lot more about, as Lowestoft was HQ to the Royal Naval Patrol Service. One of my dreams is to go to sea on one of those restored Gunboats.
As most people know he IWM has photographs galore of the RNPS vessels.
Now the gun which was fitted to the bow of a lot of the later war boats, was the 57mm Molins gun in an auto loader powered mount. Same gun as fitted to the Mosquito XVlll in Coastal Command. Another favoured weapon mount was twin .50in Vickers machine guns, in a powered open top turret.
 
This is a subject I’d like to know a lot more about, as Lowestoft was HQ to the Royal Naval Patrol Service. One of my dreams is to go to sea on one of those restored Gunboats.
As most people know he IWM has photographs galore of the RNPS vessels.
Now the gun which was fitted to the bow of a lot of the later war boats, was the 57mm Molins gun in an auto loader powered mount. Same gun as fitted to the Mosquito XVlll in Coastal Command. Another favoured weapon mount was twin .50in Vickers machine guns, in a powered open top turret.
Read Peter Scott’s book - it gives you everything you need to know.
 

Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
In the video , Mistermotorboat Magazine refers to a 3 pdr.

I have seen pix of the later (115 foot) MTBs fitted with a single Pom.

I get the impression that over a period of four years, building on experience gained in action,a number of different weapons were tried out.

These designs were used from Hong Kong to the Med, as well as in the 'narrow seas ' around UK mainland.

I reckon it was pant shittingly exhilarating.

I bet MOB drills were....um... interesting

' 'Sorry Skip - - Bunts has gone for a swim'

' Damn...AGAIN? Well, fine ...it's not too far to the OSB from here, I'm sure he knows his way by now...we'll pick him up on the way back.'
 

Slime

LE
Thanks, I'll see if I can find a copy.

I think the larger gun on the foredeck is one of these, equipped with an autoloader.

Britain Vickers 3-pdr (1.4 kg) [1.85"/50 (47 mm)] QF Marks I and II - NavWeaps - looks late Edwardian :)

MisterBoatMagazine guy seemed a little dismissive of the side-mounted twin Lewis guns.....but they were a notoriously accurate weapon ashore, which is why the SAS jeeps mounted them.

View attachment 466765

(I suspect in the AA role their primary purpose was to boost the crew's morale)


The boat which has been refurbished is one of the 'short' type.....later MTB's ( so designated regardless of their role ) were 115 feet overall.

Hazy memory tells me that some of the later MGB/MTBs were equipped with Quad MG mounts aft (?).
( this may be a Hollywood induced hallucination. )
The guns were designed for the air role, and the design of the air cooled barrel was specifically designed to cool effectively by utilising the oncoming air when used in an aircraft.
 

Slime

LE
Related thread drift.

On the LibriVox app* there is an audio book called ‘Inventions of the great war’ by Alexander Russell Bond.

I found it very interesting as it was written in the same time as the tech was introduced so talks about the inventions as though they are new kit. This approach is far different and includes a lot of detail that later publications either think the reader would know, or the author may be unaware of.

*LibriVox is a free app, it contains non copyrighted books, they are free to download or listen too.

Edit.
Related as in having a chapter that includes the air cooled guns shown above, not as in WW2 craft :)
 
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Just been on IWM web page, found these photos from Lowestoft during WW2.
First two pics are of the 50 cal Vickers in power turret, the last three are of the 57mm Molins gun and auto loader mount.
3EC1E363-44D7-491A-A8A9-2A12EF961B58.jpeg
B2EE5646-2F98-424C-A8E7-2566A2FF00D6.jpeg
25ACF98C-80FA-411E-9855-4C61478AF272.jpeg
8B43A853-6A29-4CFA-B432-5A4DEBC7210B.jpeg
3934B63B-D075-4554-8A92-4BC06B1CD364.jpeg
 
Peter Scotts book is simply the very best account of the Coastal Forces' very private and very vicious little war ever written.

He was an excellent writer with a keen eye for observation writing it from his first hand experience in real time without any historical revisionism clouding his account published in 1945.
You can absolutely feel the sheer adrenaline rush and fear of boats closing at 40+knots to point blank range with the sky full of tracer, any one of which could turn your boat and its 3,000+ gallons of 100 octane petrol into a fireball. His paintings the book is illustrated with are outstanding.
 

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