WW2 medals

#21
On the subject of selling medals, Mrs Devex and I have decided the impending (ie TODAY!!!) 25th anniversary of our nuptuals (how the f*ck I have not ended up under the patio I do not know) is a good point to update our wills. I have a great granddad's original WW1 set of two medals, cap badge and Silver War Badge, my Dad's TD and my own rack (nothing special but I earned 'em) and I'm having it written in that these can never be sold and must be kept in the family. I don't know why, it just seems important to me.
Congratulations of the anniversary!.
Now on the will, you can stipulate but its won't neccesary be Devex minor who will sell the family gongs, its more likely to happen if he has no issue (baby Devexs for the uninitiated!). Thats when the estate passes out of the direct line. And thats when the problems begin and when they end up on 'flog it', with some one saying I found then in a draw and I don't know what they are!
Just a suggestion put their Regimental service records on the back of the frames, its helpful for the future generations.
 
#22
Hi all,

I'm after some advice. My wife's family have come into possession of a relatives medals. They have hardly ever been out of the packet and are in new untouched condition.
I'm not sure what they might be worth (if anything) or who/where might be interested. The relative was RE and come with pictures and other bits and pieces.
There will be a small premium (possibly 15-20%) to recognise the fact that they are unworn and (more importantly) still in their original packaging and delivery box, which should be cardboard complete with OHMS stamp.

Have a care, though: some unscrupulous medal dealers will hive the box from the contents and sell the box separately as many have not survived.
 
#23
On the subject of selling medals, Mrs Devex and I have decided the impending (ie TODAY!!!) 25th anniversary of our nuptuals (how the f*ck I have not ended up under the patio I do not know) is a good point to update our wills. I have a great granddad's original WW1 set of two medals, cap badge and Silver War Badge, my Dad's TD and my own rack (nothing special but I earned 'em) and I'm having it written in that these can never be sold and must be kept in the family. I don't know why, it just seems important to me.
All my stuff including my militaria collection goes to my probable cause of death (assuming she hasn't burned the militaria on the front lawn by then) except for my family medals etc which go to my sons from my previous marriage.
Just in the process of finishing wills at the moment.
 
#24
On the subject of selling medals, Mrs Devex and I have decided the impending (ie TODAY!!!) 25th anniversary of our nuptuals (how the f*ck I have not ended up under the patio I do not know) is a good point to update our wills. I have a great granddad's original WW1 set of two medals, cap badge and Silver War Badge, my Dad's TD and my own rack (nothing special but I earned 'em) and I'm having it written in that these can never be sold and must be kept in the family. I don't know why, it just seems important to me.
Not so simple as it sounds, who takes possession if you have more than one offspring, which sibling gets to keep them, is that a chore for them or a privilage

Archie
 
#25
Congratulations of the anniversary!.
Now on the will, you can stipulate but its won't neccesary be Devex minor who will sell the family gongs, its more likely to happen if he has no issue (baby Devexs for the uninitiated!). Thats when the estate passes out of the direct line. And thats when the problems begin and when they end up on 'flog it', with some one saying I found then in a draw and I don't know what they are!
Just a suggestion put their Regimental service records on the back of the frames, its helpful for the future generations.
Some of the problems with medal groups arise within the direct line when offspring split dad or granddad's medals between them.
It may happen less often nowadays, people appreciating that a group's best kept together rather than split as souvenirs.
 
#26
Is there any accepted protocol re inheritance and wearing of medals?
Obviously grandfather to father to son, but what happens when the son has no offspring? Who has the 'rights to wear' then? Uncle? Cousin? Nephew?
 
#27
Is there any accepted protocol re inheritance and wearing of medals?
Obviously grandfather to father to son, but what happens when the son has no offspring? Who has the 'rights to wear' then? Uncle? Cousin? Nephew?
Simple answer? No 'right' as such exists.

Having said that, the generally accepted convention is that it is more fitting for a direct descendant to wear them, on the right chest, if they feel the need.
 
#28
Simple answer? No 'right' as such exists.

Having said that, the generally accepted convention is that it is more fitting for a direct descendant to wear them, on the right chest, if they feel the need.
You very occasionally find "old" (as opposed to recently mounted) groupings of WWI medals and the like mounted in reverse order, worn on the right breast by mothers or widows of the awardee.
 
#29
Not so simple as it sounds, who takes possession if you have more than one offspring, which sibling gets to keep them, is that a chore for them or a privilage

Archie
The poisoned chalice. My lot decided to give two rather special collections to Regimental/Airforce museums another problem covered on ARSSE a while back. Add a gallantry or interesting campaign medal and the price escalates and sometimes the temptation is to much to bear!
 
#30
There will be a small premium (possibly 15-20%) to recognise the fact that they are unworn and (more importantly) still in their original packaging and delivery box, which should be cardboard complete with OHMS stamp.

Have a care, though: some unscrupulous medal dealers will hive the box from the contents and sell the box separately as many have not survived.
They are in the (what I can only assume) original packaging and with the cardboard box. It doesn't look as though he ever bothered with them. There are photos with the Medals, a booklet from a parade he was in. Looks like he was RE. The medals have never been mounted.

I'm unsure as to whether they should be mounted. His son is his only living direct relative but he has down syndrome and is the care of his cousins. The medals don't mean a great deal to the rest of the family but are still important to them if you follow me. I know they won't fetch anything of any worth to contribute to the sons care and he wouldn't appreciate/understand their meaning.

I'm more interested in their condition, I'm sure a regimental/corps museum wouldn't be falling over themselves to have them.

Just seems a shame to keep them in a carrier bag doing nothing.
 
#31
They are in the (what I can only assume) original packaging and with the cardboard box. It doesn't look as though he ever bothered with them. There are photos with the Medals, a booklet from a parade he was in. Looks like he was RE. The medals have never been mounted.

I'm unsure as to whether they should be mounted. His son is his only living direct relative but he has down syndrome and is the care of his cousins. The medals don't mean a great deal to the rest of the family but are still important to them if you follow me. I know they won't fetch anything of any worth to contribute to the sons care and he wouldn't appreciate/understand their meaning.

I'm more interested in their condition, I'm sure a regimental/corps museum wouldn't be falling over themselves to have them.

Just seems a shame to keep them in a carrier bag doing nothing.
A difficult one, though I would strongly counsel against passing them on to the Corps/Regt museum for several reasons:

1. Sad as it may sound, they probably don't want them. Most (certainly the larger Corps such as RE) have drawers full of such stuff that will never see the light of day.

2. They will (probably) only take them if there's an uniqueness to the group or the documentation, such as a bravery decoration or other award.

3. Corps/Regt museums have form for 'losing' or 'misplacing gifted groups and ephemera.

4. The bulk of Unit museums will now only take such stuff as outright gifts as opposed to long-term loans. This is driven mostly by insurance premiums: if a thing or things are long-term loans, the museum is obliged to insure them through the property book but the item(s) remain the property of the loaner.

When I was Medals Curator for our museum we had a policy that such items would only come to us as gifts or outright donations.

Personally, it might be nice if someone put together a shadow board which displays the medals, a photo of the chap and an item of the documentation: introduce his son to these things as a storyboard-his carers may be pleasantly surprised as to how he reacts.
 

Trilby

Clanker
Book Reviewer
#32
Personally, it might be nice if someone put together a shadow board which displays the medals, a photo of the chap and an item of the documentation: introduce his son to these things as a storyboard-his carers may be pleasantly surprised as to how he reacts.
I really like this idea as a way of making a connection with the son.

As an alternative to the Corps museum, judging from my limited experience, a local museum (especially with a specifically military focus) might be more likely to put the medals and related material on display, perhaps?
 
#33
I really like this idea as a way of making a connection with the son.

As an alternative to the Corps museum, judging from my limited experience, a local museum (especially with a specifically military focus) might be more likely to put the medals and related material on display, perhaps?
I've found that truly local museums have the same issues as the larger ones, writ small. Also, they tend to be very parochial as in the subject would have to have a long and rather prominent association with the town.
 
#34
My limited experience of lending items relating to local people to local museums is that they get used as set dressing eg medals, document, insignia and photos to members of a family, five of whom served during WWII, one of whom died as a POW ( their father was KIA in WWI) - a photo of the WWII fatality was stuck on a mantel piece in a mock up of a WWII living room, and that was about that.
 
#35
I've just seen an advert for an outfit I hadn't heard of - "Vintage Cash Cow", features a talking "Mons Star".
A quick Google shows they certainly like targeting medal groups amongst other booty.
Send the stuff off, get an offer from the scavengers.
I think it goes without saying they'll give people sod all for family heirlooms sold out of despair or disinterest.
I can't see I'll ever sell my collection let alone family medal groups but if I were to then bottom feeders like these would never get a look in.
 
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