WW2 Aircraft Wreck Sites - Norway (and others)

Desperate Dan

War Hero
Is there one for Italy, specifically round cassino/gustav line?

Cheers DD
 
Went to see my uncle last week and he told me of his grandfather taking him out of the andersons shelter after a raid and sitting him on the post box outside the house to see Manchester burning. On a whim we went back there. post box still there. Odd feeling thinking my great grandad stood on the same spot holding my seven year old uncle watching such an event.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
Went to see my uncle last week and he told me of his grandfather taking him out of the andersons shelter after a raid and sitting him on the post box outside the house to see Manchester burning. On a whim we went back there. post box still there. Odd feeling thinking my great grandad stood on the same spot holding my seven year old uncle watching such an event.

My Grandad used his Anderson shelter as a tool shed up to his death.


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I guess they should know the identities of the crew, even if they can't positively ID the individual bodies.

'Archaeologists have discovered the wreck of a US-made bomber flown by the Soviet Red Army in World War II, along with the remains of four crewmen killed when it crashed in southern Poland, private broadcaster TVN reported.

'Only one man survived when the B-25 Mitchell was shot down by the German air force on January 19, 1945, a 23-year-old commander who parachuted out and was taken into German captivity. The remains of the four Soviet crewmen who perished in the crash will be laid to rest at a nearby Red Army cemetery. "The skeletons we've excavated so far are complete. Almost all of them are dressed, we found with them parts of the Soviet or American uniforms commonly used on Mitchell aircraft," said archaeologist Sebastian Witkowski.'


 
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ROMFT

Old-Salt
Hope that this is the right place for this :-

quickly run part of it through google translate :-

"The British bomber that lies at the bottom of the Markermeer is the BK716. The Ministry of Defense was able to determine this in the first week of the salvage activities of the warplane. The relatives of the seven crew members will be informed about this, the municipality of Almere said on Friday.

One of the engine blocks of the Short Stirling was recovered during the work. Thanks to the registration number on the aircraft part, it could be established with certainty that it concerns the BK716.

This confirms the suspicion of the Aircraft Recovery Group 1940-1945 foundation. Part of the landing gear was already removed from the Markermeer in 2008. Based on research, the foundation concluded that it was probably the BK716.

The bomber was shot down by a German night fighter over the lake in the night of March 29-30, 1943. Seven British and Canadian crew members were on board."

and a translation of one of the comments from one of the news-site readers:-

"With this salvage we can show the next of kin that we still have a lot of respect for the men and women who fought for our freedom."
 
Some good photos in the Wail of a recently revealed B17 in Iceland; won't comment on the 'journalism'.

33504346-8762209-image-a-12_1600820868588.jpg

Locals examine the wreckage on the melted glacier in the south of Iceland

'A US WWII bomber has emerged from a melting glacier in Iceland 76 years after it crashed on it way to England.

'The B-17 Flying Fortress bomber flew into the Eyjafjallajokull glacier in southern Iceland on September 16, 1944.

'Miraculously all of its 10 crew members survived but the wreckage was abandoned and was swallowed up by the glacier.

'Today, with global warming stripping the land of ice, the war plane has re-appeared, mangled and torn but still able to provide a fascinating glimpse into the past.'


 
One to look for on the BBC.

'A team of experienced aviation archaeologists, assisted by pupils from Foyle College, Derry successfully excavated the remains of a rare Coastal Command Bristol Beaufort aircraft in Ballykelly, over the weekend.

'The aircraft, serial number AW 271 crashed on April 30 1942 just outside Ballykelly.

'Sadly, the wartime crew of three were killed in the incident.

'The dig was licensed by the Ministry Of Defence and DfC Historic Environment Division and was filmed for the BBC archaeology series ‘Digging for Britain.’


 

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