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WW1 & WW2 were all in vain! Today Brown surrenders!

#1
The unelected, non-representative Scottish Prime Minister of what is left of our once great country, Mr Brown, sneaks off to Lisbon today to finally sign the surrender of our national identity, freedom and sovereignty to Germany and her acolites.

Miliband has written a smoke-screen letter in today's Telegraph - but surely NO-ONE is fooled by the duplicity and lies and spin put out to mask what it all really means.

Tomorrow we will not be British!

He will then, with all the thick skinned & bare-faced cheek turn up in Paris to watch England's valiant rugger team attempt the impossible!
 
#4
Truly I despair.

And NOTHING from the opposition! Why hasn't Cameron stood up and reminded Brown that he can not commit the country to it's doom like this?

Why has he not vowed publicly to undo this awful treasonable crime if his shower get in?

Why are the bloody politicians not howling from the roof tops about broken manifesto promises?

Why do we all give in so fcuking easily? Surely, Revolution is nigh.......?

Foot & Mouth Disease, Blue Tongue, HIPs, Selling off the nations' Gold Reserves, scrapping the Royal Yacht, Surrendering our independance: Ladies and Gentlemen, I give you Mr Brown's pitiful legacy. Cnut.
 
#5
We all know why the 'grinning spiv' sucked European Soviet Union arse because he wanted to be the first 'Emperor'.

Why is 'Bottler' Brown determined to renege on an election promise and to kow-tow to the unelected (as he is) unaccountable apparatchiks of the European Soviet Union? Could it be to gain special treatment for 'his' country - Scotland - when that country has full independence (courtesy of 'McBottler') and membership of the European Soviet Union?

As for 'legacy' mentioned by a previous poster. Bliar's is simple:
'The Worst Prime Minister of Modern Times - perhaps ever';

'McBottler's' may be to be even worse!!!!!!!
 

dpcw

War Hero
#6
Top of my head (without googling)- the only election promise that this set of monkeys has kept is the one to ban hunting with dogs.
 
#7
Jesus guys, its only a piece of paper......

At the end of the day any law or treaty is only valid if supported by the people/parliament of a nation.

One simple vote or election and the EU can be kicked into touch - simply because they are not an elected representitive body.

The EU parliament? simply vote for members who wish it to be dissolved - easy.

Pieces of paper don't build or protect nations, a nations military does that.
 
#9
IT_Guy said:
Jesus guys, its only a piece of paper......

At the end of the day any law or treaty is only valid if supported by the people/parliament of a nation.

One simple vote or election and the EU can be kicked into touch - simply because they are not an elected representitive body.

The EU parliament? simply vote for members who wish it to be dissolved - easy.

Pieces of paper don't build or protect nations, a nations military does that.
In his ten years as Prime Minister, Tony Blair has introduced a new law every three-and-a- quarter hours, new research reveals.
Since 1997, an average of 2,685 laws have been passed every year - a 22 per cent rise on the previous decade.
They have covered subjects ranging from the importing of bed linen to the evaluation of statistics on labour costs.
The figure does not include European Union laws which also affect Britain - last year, 2,100 of those were passed, bringing the total to 4,785 or 13 every day, according to legal publishers Sweet & Maxwell.
Of the laws, 98 per cent were brought in by statutory instruments, rather than Acts of Parliament. The procedure allows less time for debate by MPs than the tabling of a Bill.
The statutes themselves have become longer, with five Acts passed last year taking more than 100 pages to explain, three of them more than 200, another above 300, another above 500 and one more than 700 pages long.
Shadow Cabinet Office minister Oliver Heald said: "Tony Blair and Gordon Brown think the answer to everything is to make a new law.
"But, after creating thousands of new laws, violent crime has doubled."
A spokesman for the Bar Council, which represents barristers in England and Wales, said: "Politicians often equate legislation with action.
"But the growing complexity of the law is the main reason trials are taking longer and costing more."
A No.10 spokesman said: "The Government makes no apology for legislating where necessary to improve the lives of people in this country."

My bold.
This government doesn't even bebate half the laws of the country in parliament anymore, so why should they care if Germany or France make them up for us.

It appears new liarbour are resposible for stealth laws aswell as stealth taxes.
 
#10
Guys we have three choices:
1 Shut up.
2 Put up.
3 Leave the country and go somewhere else.

If you want to do something about it then do something about it. If not then winge as much as you like and wish we'd done something about it once its all gone t1ts up.

Or do what tens of thousands did last year and more will do this year, leave the country. Speaking for my self and my Mrs, we have just restructured our work so that she will be in Spain I'll be working here and commuting from Spain. The reasons for this are many fold but can be encapsulated thus.

Its a cheaper and better life in Spain but I can make more money here.

I appologise in advance to the rest of you as you will now be shouldering a bigger share of the tax burden. I'll be paying mine in Spain. However as recompense I can offer cheap accomodation if anyone wants a break.
 
#12
Queensman said:
Why hasn't Cameron stood up and reminded Brown that he can not commit the country to it's doom like this?
So that he can point the finger of blame at Cameron and say innocently: "It wasn´t us guv"

IT_Guy said:
Pieces of paper don't build or protect nations, a nations military does that.
Methinks we´re a bit overstretched as it is at the moment :wink:
 
#13
IT_Guy said:
Jesus guys, its only a piece of paper......

At the end of the day any law or treaty is only valid if supported by the people/parliament of a nation.

One simple vote or election and the EU can be kicked into touch - simply because they are not an elected representitive body.

The EU parliament? simply vote for members who wish it to be dissolved - easy.

Pieces of paper don't build or protect nations, a nations military does that.
So you support each of the 3000+ pieces of legislation enacted in the last decade? The only ones that I actually know of I disapprove of.
 
#14
I predict a riot,
I predict a riot!
 
#15
Queensman said:
The unelected, non-representative Scottish Prime Minister of what is left of our once great country, Mr Brown, sneaks off to Lisbon today to finally sign the surrender of our national identity, freedom and sovereignty to Germany and her acolites.

Miliband has written a smoke-screen letter in today's Telegraph - but surely NO-ONE is fooled by the duplicity and lies and spin put out to mask what it all really means.

Tomorrow we will not be British!

He will then, with all the thick skinned & bare-faced cheek turn up in Paris to watch England's valiant rugger team attempt the impossible!
I'm confused. The above, and the following, can't both be true. It's a logical impossibility. So who's mistaken, or is telling lies?

:?

Debunking the Eurosceptic myths about the EU Reform Treaty

Published: 18 October 2007

1. Britain is surrendering vital powers over fundamental issues of sovereignty to Brussels

Not really. Britain has maintained control over our key national policy areas including justice and home affairs, social security, tax, foreign policy and defence. The treaty will not transfer power on issues of fundamental importance.

2. Britain will lose or have to vacate its seat on the United Nations Security Council

No. The treaty will include a declaration saying it will not affect the way EU member states conduct their foreign and defence policy, including at the UN. The UN Charter says international organisations such as the EU cannot be members of the UN.

3. An "EU foreign minister" will control Britain's foreign policy

Wrong. At present the EU has both a high representative for the common foreign and security policy and a commissioner for external relations. The proposed high representative for foreign affairs and security policy will combine the two existing roles. The high representative will be appointed by and report to EU member states. Britain will keep its veto.

4. British embassies will be replaced by an EU "diplomatic service" and EU embassies

Not true. The European External Action Service (EEAS) will not replace the UK diplomatic service. It will simply provide better co-ordination and sensible support to the high representative, including through existing European Commission offices overseas.

5. Britain will lose control of its borders

No. It will be able to choose whether or not to participate in EU action on issues such as immigration, asylum and combating international terrorism and organised crime.

6. There will be a new 'president of Europe'

Incorrect. At the moment each EU member state takes it in turns to be president of the EU for six months. This has caused confusion and a lack of continuity. Under the treaty, elected national leaders will choose someone to be president of the European Council for two-and-a-half years. This will allow national leaders to set the political direction of the EU more consistently and coherently.

7. The treaty will force us to free prisoners from jail

Not true. No criminals in the UK will be released because of the treaty.

8. The treaty will reduce national parliaments to the level of regional assemblies

No. The treaty seeks to increase the role and powers of national parliaments, which will for the first time have a direct role in deciding whether EU legislation is necessary.

9. The treaty is the same as the Constitutional Treaty rejected in 2005

No. The EU's 27 leaders have agreed that the constitutional approach has been abandoned. The constitutional symbols have been removed from the treaty – the EU flag, hymn and title of foreign minister.

This shows that the mythical "superstate" is just that – a myth. The Government claims it has secured a deal that protects key aspects of sovereignty.

For example, Britain can carry on participating in joint efforts to combat cross-border terrorism and organised crime, but will keep control of our borders. Instead of establishing a new constitutional basis for the EU, the treaty amends previous EU treaties.

This is what the Maastricht, Nice and Amsterdam treaties did. They were not "constitutional" and Britain did not hold a referendum on any of them.

10. The treaty will leadto British workers becoming second-class citizens

No. The rights and principles set out in the Charter of Fundamental Rights already exist in UK law – they are not new. They apply now both to EU institutions and to all member states when they implement EU law.

The Government claims it has won a legally binding protocol that guarantees the charter does not extend the powers of any court – European or domestic – to strike down UK laws.

http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article3070577.ece
 
#16
Whiskybreath said:
IT_Guy said:
Jesus guys, its only a piece of paper......

At the end of the day any law or treaty is only valid if supported by the people/parliament of a nation.

One simple vote or election and the EU can be kicked into touch - simply because they are not an elected representitive body.

The EU parliament? simply vote for members who wish it to be dissolved - easy.

Pieces of paper don't build or protect nations, a nations military does that.
So you support each of the 3000+ pieces of legislation enacted in the last decade? The only ones that I actually know of I disapprove of.
Minimum wage?
 
#17
I find it ironic that the meeting is in Portugal, one of the bigest offenders when it comes to the introduction of European Legislation (they just dont bother), and if I recall owe the largest amount in fines to the European Courts
 
#18
Too cowardly to call an election. Too arrogant to call a referendum.

Brown has a narrow legal mandate to act as he does but no moral one.
His cynical and reprehensible behaviour is an affront to natural justice.
He is imposing further constitutional change on our nation and further surrendering our right to self government and self determination to a foreign institution that most British people view with suspicion and hostility and want no further integration with.

I think that the the time for systematic and organised civil disobedience is fast approaching.
 

Biped

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
"The Great Deception" by somebody or other goes to great lengths to provide a full and complete history of the grand european project, from just after WW1, to the state we have today.

It is terrifying reading and goes some way to explaining why the EU buildings are called what they are; fgor example, Monet was a leading light in terms of the EU superstate that was envisaged over 60 years ago.

It also explains how, when faced with objections and hostility from the people of Europe to the 'grand design', it would be brought in in tiny little, pallatable chunks through the governments of Europe, and never put before the people as the complete ideal that it was. It was envisaged that the idea would NEVER be popular with the people of Europe, and thus, it would come in by the back door, starting with the Council of Europe, then it turned into the EEC, or Common Market, and eventually an EU superstate. By the time the masses realised what was at stake, it would be a done deal.

Well, we are almost at that point now folks. Our lkaws are now passed in Brussels, our nationalk governments are no longer sovereign as they simply rubber stamp EU diktats, whilst providing only a lip-service to the idea of nation-state democracy. It is indeed too late, without revolution, to turn back the tide of the EU superstate.
 
#20
overpromoted said:
Whiskybreath said:
IT_Guy said:
Jesus guys, its only a piece of paper......

At the end of the day any law or treaty is only valid if supported by the people/parliament of a nation.

One simple vote or election and the EU can be kicked into touch - simply because they are not an elected representitive body.

The EU parliament? simply vote for members who wish it to be dissolved - easy.

Pieces of paper don't build or protect nations, a nations military does that.
So you support each of the 3000+ pieces of legislation enacted in the last decade? The only ones that I actually know of I disapprove of.
Minimum wage?
Falls into the 'not give much of a toss' category. There've been more than adequate safeguards - compared to most other countries - to prevent starvation in the UK since Beveridge. There haven't been adequate safeguards to prevent weaselly professional politicians from stealing our freedom since about the same time.
 

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