Reference Image WW1 Tanks and Armoured Cars

#1
Reference images from the Tank Museum (as requested for upcoming WW1 group build).

Trench warfare:-

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#2
Mk1 Male (male tanks fielded 2x 6pdr guns in place of two of the MGs, female tanks deployed MGs only):-

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#9
MkIV Male:-

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Hornsby tractor:-
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Period fuel cans:-
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#13
Nice photos of the '101' Mk IV with 6 pounder/ 57mm gun, and bundle of faggots/fascines. I believe they could shove that Sponson inside the tank to facilitate (rail) transport. There used to be a female (with machine guns) version of the Mk IV in the middle of Ashford.

5 tanks that changed the course of the First World War
 
#14
I believe they could shove that Sponson inside the tank to facilitate (rail) transport.
Unbolted and parked on the flat car at each end of the tank, according to the TM bods. They've got one of the trolleys that the sponsons were moved about on in the WW1 exhibit. Might be visible in the background of one of my pics.
 
#15
Unbolted and parked on the flat car at each end of the tank, according to the TM bods. They've got one of the trolleys that the sponsons were moved about on in the WW1 exhibit. Might be visible in the background of one of my pics.
Ah thanks. In the old Mk I tank it was necessary to detach the sponsons, or armoured "bow-windows," on either side before the tank could be moved by rail. I'd read that the flange connecting the gun sponson to the Mk IV, was inside, and they just took out the bolts and pushed the sponson inwards for clearance.
 
#16
Ah thanks. In the old Mk I tank it was necessary to detach the sponsons, or armoured "bow-windows," on either side before the tank could be moved by rail. I'd read that the flange connecting the gun sponson to the Mk IV, was inside, and they just took out the bolts and pushed the sponson inwards for clearance.
Possibly but looking at the interior there doesn't look like there's enough room, what with the engine being in the middle, along with some other stuff on the inside of the sponson at the main hull join, like ammo racks.
 
#18
I've read up on this, now the Mk I and training mkII for transport, the sponsons had to be removed and placed on its own trolley. They've got the last remaining one at Bovingdon.(As shown by NSP)
The Mk IV and V sponsons were unbolted and pushed inside. I'm a bit unsure, but I think I read that the sponsons actually swung in. ie The front slide in a bit, but the back went in further.
There is a photo in the currant issue (59) of History of War. It was taken in the summer of 1918 during the 100 day offence. I'm unable to load on here for some reason.
I'm pretty sure these are mkVs, they've got the louvers and semafore(?) signaling device at the back.
Also of note, the stronger but lighter fascines on top. Designed to be recoverable for reuse.
 
#19
These threads are useful, insofar as they give technical details as well as stories and events that are being lost or forgotten.

The Mk IV male always puts me in mind of the "siege of Fray Bentos",
August 22, 1917, Third Ypres. F41 (2329) supported 61st Division near St Julien, and was named Fray Bentos after the meat company (I believe there were two including replacement 8019).

The 2329 crew was "the most highly decorated tank crew of the war" ; the story was in all the papers, and in a lot of books.

Although Fray Bentos couldn’t move, it could still shoot, and the 6 pounder gunners ‘successfully engaged the MGs at Gallipoli farm.’
Story, crew and photos at Tank 100: TRAPPED: THE STORY OF FRAY BENTOS
 
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