WW1 Shell Casing Identify Help

I have a brass WW1 shell. It has many markings on the base.
I have no idea what any mean apart from a big 1918 mark on the bottom which I guess is the year.
Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Here is a photo:
2015-01-31_16-16-41_+0000277851682.png
 

Ravers

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Looks pretty clean for a WW1 case.

It also says 1980 on it. What makes you think it's from 1918 and not 1980?

Not saying it's not WW1, I haven't got a clue. But it could just as easily be from 1980.
 
The head-stamp of these particular shells displays the British broad arrow and the initials ‘EOC’ indicates that they were made at the Elswick Ordnance Company, England; the initials ‘CF’ signal that the charge was loaded with cordite, a standard propellant.
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
I think the little diamond is a quality assurance mark from an inspector. btw it is a cartridge case, not a shell. The fuze, probably from a different factory, has its own set of marks. Elswick was I think part of the Vickers empire in the NE. Broad arrow says Government Property. Allegedly originally the armorial of a particular Master of the Ordnance way back.
 

HE117

LE
The 18lbr was a WW1 era fixed QF gun, where the projectile was firmly attached to the case..
Interesting that the primer is dated 1917.. normally the primers are later than the cases..
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
It is an 18 pounder cartridge case, as said already. I have a poorly cut down one in my workshop awaiting some TLC.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Primers and cartridge cases were made separately, and a lot were made in USA and Canada. I believe they were mated along with shells and propellant at ordnance depots in UK before being shipped to operational theatres, but willing to be educated on that!
 

HE117

LE
Nope..

18 pounder ammunition was assembled in an ordnance factory, not a depot..

Primers or fuzes could be exchanged as part of a repair programme in a depot or in the field, but this would have been exceptional.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Well I did say I'd be willing to be educated...
 

HE117

LE
Well I did say I'd be willing to be educated...
...never stop learning!

The 13 and 18 pounders had what is known as "fixed" ammunition.. the shell and the case were fixed together at manufacture and were not interchangeable. Before the 1920s UK artillery was divided into "guns" and "howitzers" - guns had fixed ammo and howitzers had separate ammunition. At the beginning of WW1, the normal projectile was an airburst shrapnel shell which was good against troops in the open, however by 1918, this had changed to HE shell as it was more effective against trenches..

Post 1920.. most artillery became gun/howitzers with separate ammunition - the 25 lbr had a separate loaded shell and cart case. the 5.5 and above had a separate loading shell and bag charge. This allowed the charge to be varied and allowed the guns to shoot at varying trajectories to reach into dead ground..
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
Agreed on all you say HE, but I remember reading about component parts being manufactured all over and then being assembled in UK. Did I confuse ordnance depots with ordnance factories, or was I thinking of another ammunition type?
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
RIP
Curious. I had it in my head that a howitzer was a gun that fired in the upper register, i.e. to fire over the top of whatever and bash somebody on the reverse slope.
 
Curious. I had it in my head that a howitzer was a gun that fired in the upper register, i.e. to fire over the top of whatever and bash somebody on the reverse slope.

It is. They just used seperate ammunition or BL because you couldn't used fixed ammo whilst the barrel is in high elevation.
 

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