WW1 Paperwork, Ephemera etc.

I couldn't find a specific thread so apologies if this is a duplicate.
When clearing my paternal Grandmother's house, aged 11, I happened upon one of my Grandpa's notebooks from WW1.
It came to light again, having to clear out our flat (after the scum council evicted us for their mistakes).
I find it to be a fascinating snapshot, a mixture of technical information, humour and remembered songs to remind one of home:
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Here a sketch of one Cpl. McCarthy.
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Some Morse abbreviations.
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There are various circuit diagrams for transmitters and receivers.
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A great deal of protocols for using the Pigeon Post.
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Similarly for the use of Popham Panels. My 11 year old self, although well used to researching the obscure, could find no reference to these mystery objects. Very much later, I discovered that they were large frames with movable linen panes for signalling to passing aircraft.
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See Above.
Most pages are taken up with song lyrics, some quite sentimental, others more light-hearted:
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Does anybody else have any such fragile records that survived the conflict?
I never met my Grandpa, he died two years before I came along.
Having survived the Somme and ultimately the War itself, he suffered terribly with trench-foot for the rest of his life and died of the respiratory complications from exposure to enemy poison gases, probably chlorine and phosgene.
He served with both RA and RE.
 

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oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
Not in the same league as that collection, I have two letters written by my great uncle. One was thrown from the train taking his unit as it passed through Northallerton Station as they were heading to Folkestone, the other was written a few days later from the front, he was killed a few days after that in one of the first gas attacks.
 
Not in the same league as that collection, I have two letters written by my great uncle. One was thrown from the train taking his unit as it passed through Northallerton Station as they were heading to Folkestone, the other was written a few days later from the front, he was killed a few days after that in one of the first gas attacks.
So you only have that thrown from the train, presumably his not having the time to post it himself before mobilisation, because some responsible citizen took the time to pick it up and post it. Gosh how times have changed!
Such bad news about you great uncle's fate. I am reminded of the grandfather of one of my history masters. Just before the advance to the front early in 1915, he was in the infirmary having been injured playing football. Barely 24 hrs later, his entire Bn. had been wiped out.
There but for the grace of God.
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
I believe a lot of lads threw letters out at Northallerton, it's the closest main line station to the village where a lot lived. As far As I'm aware it's the only one to have survived.
 
Clearing an ancient aunties flat unearthed a shoe box containing letters from my great grandfather to my great grandmother. Great insight into day to day life. Then the letters stopped.
Jack Wiggins was killed at Neuve Chapelle in March 1915. He was initially listed as missing.
There was further correspondence in the box, from the War Office, obviously replies to letters from Nell to them. Reading between the lines, she was desperately trying to get them to declare him dead. She had nine mouths to feed and the grim realty was that she needed the widow's pension. That seems to be the context. There were also newspaper cuttings of small ads asking for information.
A very different world then.
 
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