WW1 medal advice identification/wearing of advice please

This a very important thing to me,so I don't ask your advice lightly.

my Godfather was like a family member to me [more so] I visited him every time on leave, he had no family after his wife died and no children. I carry his memory along with my elderly mother.

I have his medals RFC/RAF etc. nothing remarkable other than like many he did his bit.
since he died in the 80s I have kept them safe I have never worn them nor my own [ N.I.]
its not like me to go on parades and things and never was.

today I was in talks with the archivist at the Army museum in Middle wallop, close by where he came from in fact.
I had no idea the RFC was army, anyway I have offered his medals, a RFC ring and old playing cards.
so all can see them and to keep his memory alive after me.

once they are donated that's it they wont be mine so a couple of questions.

1, do you see any pitfalls?

2,do you have any knowledge of these medals?

3,can I [and should I] maybe wear them in his honour one time before I hand them over, do you think it would be the thing to do?

4,if so, what is the prescribed manner in doing this, is remembrance day best or is there any other time that would be suitable?

any sound advice gratefully received










 
Give them to them 'on loan', that way you can always get them back again.
 
I respectfully think they'd need a bit of tidying up before you should wear them - if you chose to.......
Me personally I wouldnt he's still your godparent and not a genuine relative [that was written with a lot of thought and not flippantly] regardless of his 'relationship' with you.........
 
Legally I would think its like wearing your next door neighbours.........

[legally is too strong a word but you know what I mean]
 
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I'm no car expert, but that looks like it was taken about 1960. So lets say he was in the RFC in 1918, at the age of 18 (just doing this to keep the maths easy) and he served until, say, 1960, that would have made him 60 ish (As a minimum). I suspect that he would have been one of the last WWI chaps to serve in the RAF. Perhaps you might want to consider the RAF Museum at RAF Hendon - which has a large RFC section, as the RAF was the successor Service to the RFC and RNAS.

Would I wear them (if I had inherited them) at Remembrance? Probably not; I see that it is becoming more popular but I feel that many do it to shine in reflected glory of someone they didn't know.

What's the last medal that's been sewn on?
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
In answer to your Q2 - The normal 3 of 1st WW Pip, Squeak and Wilfred, The Defence Medal 39-45 (Home Guard or other) and a nice 1953 Coronation medal (3 Monarchs) - You can get his service records as these are on his medal card.

If I was thou, I would get them court mounted and framed with the pic and deck of cards and get it hung on your wall.

Personally I would not wear them, nor do I wear mine. However, it's a personal matter and it really is as simple as that
 
3,can I [and should I] maybe wear them in his honour one time before I hand them over, do you think it would be the thing to do?
I can understand why you may wish to, but it does go counter to the original idea of wearing fallen NOK's medals.

When George V gave the edict for Armistice services after the First World War that Next of Kin might wear medals, it only mentioned widows, parents, and orphans (in the original meaning of orphan) being able to wear the medals of their kin who died in the war.

Although not specifically mentioned, it was intended for them to be worn on the left breast.

In recent years it's become an example of 'medal creep' caused mainly by people who like to wear medals,
and the wearing conveniently moved to the right breast.

Despite what the RBL might say, the wearing of medals by those who are not direct relatives of those
killed in conflict, is no more a tradition than wearing 'one rank higher' on your wedding day. Although both 'traditions' are probably motivated by the same desire.

Of course, no one is going to bother if another's medals are worn (unless, of course, the wearer is serving)
but you can honour someone else's service without the need to wear their medals.
 
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If I was thou, I would get them court mounted and framed with the pic and deck of cards and get it hung on your wall.

I looked into this for an in-law and initially I would have gone for Court mounting. However Court mounting, for those away from Court, is a very modern trend; I feel that old medals should be swing-mounted; if possible using the existing ribbons.
 
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In recent years it's become an example of 'medal creep' caused mainly by people who like to wear medals,
and the wearing conveniently moved to the right breast.

Despite what the RBL might say, the wearing of medals by those who are not direct relatives of those
killed in conflict, is no more a tradition than wearing 'one rank higher' on your wedding day. Although both 'traditions' are probably motivated by the same desire.
Absolutely - a very 'new' tradition, and a little odd. Interestingly, RAF Dress Regulations now remind RAF personnel that, inspite of the desire to remember relatives who have served, medals in this category should not be worn in uniform, whether it be on left or right breast. As I mentioned above, I'm sure its a case,for some people, of 'look at me'.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
I looked into this for an in-law and initially I would have gone for Court mounting. However Court mounting, for those away from Court, is a very modern trend; I feel that old medals should be swing-mounted; if possible using the existing ribbons.
I agree with that.
 

MoleBath

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
If not of big financial value it is kinder to give medals to a museum rather than loan them,it keeps their admin down.A lot of admin is done by unpaid volunteers.I am just donating a couple of medals ,id disk and fallen plaque to a small town museum.Good luck
 
Wow great answers I really appreciate them all, a BIG HELP

I did not want to wear them other than once if that was the thing to do.
as I said its not my sort of thing, it would have been only to honour him.

I am uncomfortable with all this medal wearing etc. [at times].
a few weeks ago I went over to say hello to what I though was a fusilier at a funeral.
but he told me he only had a hackle on his RBL vest as he liked it, I walked away.

I did want to loan them but it seems donation is the only option.
I tried duxford and IWM but they where not responsive.

now I have found out that RFC was Army, the museum is near his town [and my birthplace] plus it will be a nice little summer ride out .
the fact the chap was very keen and helpful, combined with your answers.
well you have put my mind at rest I will donate them in the name of the 2 sides of the family's name [ i wont wear them].
I feel a weight lifted and my mind at peace.

thanks again good job
 
I would say keep them mounted as worn by the recipient. I would offer them on loan or frame and keep them along with yours. Personally I only wear my own medals not my father or grandfathers, though they all sit side by side on the stairs 364 days a year
 
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Good Decision Bratty. Otherwise you might have been mistaken for this fellow:

IMG00486-20130619-1920.jpg

None of them have been awarded to him. He's either bought them or wearing ones belonging to someone else. Taken at a Queen's Birthday Cocktail Party at a British Consulate, no less.
 
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I would have hoped the RAF Regt man in the background might have noticed and had a word
We did, and he made some cock'n'bull story up, but to be honest, he clearly had a few 'issues'. A cocktail party was neither the time nor the place to fill him in. I'd noticed him at a Remembrance Service wearing an RAF beret and a similar collection of RAF themed trinkets and after this event I spoke to the CG's PA. The response - which I reported here a couple of years ago - was along the lines of 'Oh, we know about Mr Smith (let's say). Harmless enough and the locals like him'.
 

Rod924

LE
Kit Reviewer
To be fair, he is wearing bought tat, though someone in the family was a bit nails with the MM in the Woooargh
 
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Deleted 60082

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To be fair, he is wearing bought tat, though someone in the family was a bit nails with the MM in Woooargh
Yes, well, I don't recall him wearing those miniatures at the previous Remembrance Service, so that's a bit suspect, too. Anyway, this isn't a Waltenkommando thread, so I don't want to detract much from the excellent post the OP made.
 

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