WW1 Deaths in your neighbourhood.

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#2
I tried this - it identified the area correctly but reported 0 deaths whereas we actually have six.
 

Stumpy4154

LE
Book Reviewer
#3
Just been browsing it using my mum and dads postcode from where I grew up and wish Id known about it before I went on my trip to Ypres. I found one lad who lived across the road from my old house as well as some others from the surrounding roads who are either buried or commemorated at some of the cemeteries we visited. I would have stopped by the graves or panels where he is commemorated on and said "Hello".
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#4
Well I think that will help solve a family mystery, we have some photos in our family of a military funeral, my father cnonly recall a little details but with this I can narrow it down
 

engr172

War Hero
Book Reviewer
#7
I saw this. Was quite accurate as far as I could tell
 
#8
Once I got to grips with it, I was quite impressed with the amount of information that it links to. Obviously, the amount of information depends on the data available - some won't have much more than a town of origin, others have details of parents and wives as well as various forms of documentation.

Something that the results will lead to will be questions as to what entries on the forms mean. For instance, on the Graves Registration Report Form, what is "Two int for 3 Burs"?
 

Joker62

ADC
Book Reviewer
#9
Islington council has done this to educate people.
 
#10
I posted this on ARRSE some time ago ... I went to school in Tynemouth for a while and nearby North Shields certainly felt the pain of the Grim Reaper in WW1 ... every yellow dot was a casualty ...

WW1 Casualties in North Shields.jpg


The linky also displays many casualties in the area when a Post Code is entered ... the presentation above was the result of work by a local research group* .... very sobering .

* ETA see linky for detail ... Tynemouth World War One Commemoration Project
 
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Goatman

ADC
Book Reviewer
#12
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#13
I have scanned over some of the small villages and towns i have lived in and grown up in and it has many names of people that still live there . Fascinating .
 
#14
Thanks for posting that. It actually fills in a bit of family history.

My father never really said anything about his childhood, although we could pick up that it wasn't fun, with an alcoholic father and being picked on at school. Out of vague interest, I looked to see WWI deaths around my grandmothers old house, and just a few doors along in the same street there was someone who from his name must have been my great grandfather.

Putting two and two together and probably getting five, my 32 year old great grandfather must have been in the first wave of recruits, leaving the family business to his wife and young son. He was a private in the Middlesex Regiment, and by October of 1914 he was dead. Grandfather subsequently gets to run the business as a teenager with no adult supervision, treats the takings as spending money and becomes the mainstay of the local pub and bookies for the next few decades.
 

Joshua Slocum

LE
Book Reviewer
#15
Thanks for posting that. It actually fills in a bit of family history.

My father never really said anything about his childhood, although we could pick up that it wasn't fun, with an alcoholic father and being picked on at school. Out of vague interest, I looked to see WWI deaths around my grandmothers old house, and just a few doors along in the same street there was someone who from his name must have been my great grandfather.

Putting two and two together and probably getting five, my 32 year old great grandfather must have been in the first wave of recruits, leaving the family business to his wife and young son. He was a private in the Middlesex Regiment, and by October of 1914 he was dead. Grandfather subsequently gets to run the business as a teenager with no adult supervision, treats the takings as spending money and becomes the mainstay of the local pub and bookies for the next few decades.
He might have been at Mons, Obourg they fought a Brave battle, many are buried at St Symphorium
 
#16
I tried this - it identified the area correctly but reported 0 deaths whereas we actually have six.
I tried it for where I now live and where I used to live. Sad to say it failed miserably.....
The geocoding seems a bit idiosyncratic.

It places this chap in actual Greenland when he seems to have originated in house called "Greenland" in a village called Partington near Hull. Link

Also this chap, apparently on the basis that his surname is Greenland. Link

And this chap is placed on the actual Bear Island on the basis of being from Bear Island Ontario. Link
 
#17
It says 75 for the area I grew up in, which I think is more or less right. My English teacher at Carrickfergus Grammar was in the T.A. and was well into military history. I seem to recall in or around 80 being mentioned.

English lessons were fun! Very little English learned.

Edit: 2271 from the area I live in now. Sobering.
 
#18
143 in my crappy little Parish which seems unlikely

Looking a bit closer reveals a cluster. Turns out to be to the church, where the memorials are
 
#20
"Two interments for 3 Burials"?
That's what I came up with but couldn't fathom what it actually means.

To put it in context, the chap in question died of his wounds in 1920 so it seems likely that he would have been buried only once. The form has two other entries, one who was killed in 1915, the other in 1918, and who also have a similar phrase appended - though the first one had just one Int but still 3 Burs.

Link to the Form:

Casualty
 

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