WW1 Centenary Rememberance Plans

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#1
David Cameron is set to reveal plans to commemorate the centenary of the start of World War I.

The PM will use a talk in London to underline why young people should be more aware of the sacrifices made by past generations.

It comes as a survey for a think tank suggests 69% of people want Remembrance Day 2014 to be a special national day.

British Future is calling for shops to close and flags to fly at half-mast out of respect for the fallen soldiers.

It also wants sporting fixtures such as Premier League football matches to be postponed and a longer period of silence to be observed.
Contemporary significance

BBC political correspondent Iain Watson says that while Mr Cameron wants to use his speech to talk to young people about commemorating the past, the year 2014 also has a contemporary significance.

It is when the referendum on Scottish independence will be held, so a reminder of what the nations of the UK have achieved together is seen as not unhelpful to the unionist cause, our correspondent says.

The YouGov online poll on behalf of the think tank British Future asked more than 1,700 British adults whether they believed Remembrance Sunday 2014 should be commemorated differently.

More than 80% of respondents thought bells should be rung across the UK and flags should fly at half-mast, and just over half thought major sports events should be moved to another day.

But the survey showed people were divided over whether shops should be closed - with 45% for and 45% against the proposal.

British Future director Sunder Katwala said: "We all need to decide if Remembrance Sunday in 2014 is going to feel pretty much like any other Sunday where Rooney plays for Man United [sic] against Arsenal... and all the garden centres and supermarkets open just as usual.

"Or should this be a special Sunday where we close the shops and have a football-free day and find ways to bring us together and understand our history and the country we have become?" he said.
BBC News - WWI centenary remembrance plans to be unveiled

Must admit I thought this lot would hope it just passed without mention!
 
#5
I applaud the decision to do something, but would like a small amount of the money they are pledging to be diverted to finish off paying the WWII Bomber Command memorial costs.
 
#6
"…BBC political correspondent Iain Watson says that while Mr Cameron wants to use his speech to talk to young people about commemorating the past, the year 2014 also has a contemporary significance.…"

What's this CMD wrapping himself in the flag in 2014 for political ends?
Hmmmm, his big plans wouldn't be influenced by the fact he will also be contesting a rather painful General Election and facing getting his P45 only a matter months after Remembrance Day 2014?
 
#9
Thursday, 11 October 2012 - The Royal British Legion -

WORLD WAR I CENTENARY TO BRING NATION TOGETHER, SAYS LEGION

The Royal British Legion welcomes Prime Minister David Cameron’s announcement of support for World War I centenary observations, saying the anniversary “will bring the nation together as one in Remembrance.”

Chris Simpkins, the Legion’s Director General, said:

“The tragic events of 1914-1918 have left a deep imprint on the fabric of the nation. As the Custodian of Remembrance, the Legion will ensure that the centenary will be observed across the UK – the costs of sacrifice and the lessons learned in this dreadful conflict must not be forgotten.”

Mr Simpkins said it was fitting that central government would provide support for national and international commemorations, while leaving it up to voluntary membership organisations such as The Royal British Legion to decide on local observances.

“The losses of World War I were felt in every town and village across the UK, as demonstrated by the monuments found in nearly every village green or churchyard,” he said. “It is right and proper that the centenary has a strong local flavour.”

The Royal British Legion has been working in partnership alongside organisations such as the Imperial War Museum and the Prime Minister’s special envoy for centenary observances, Dr Andrew Murrison MP.
“Founded in the aftermath of World War I, the Legion has faithfully kept Remembrance and reminded the nation of its collective debt to those who Serve, which the Legion expresses through its on-going support and campaigning on behalf of our Armed Forces family,” said Mr. Simpkins.
"We will be working alongside partner organisations to ensure that the events of a century ago, and their enduring relevance for today, are not forgotten.”
The Royal British Legion was founded in 1921 when ex-Service organisations arising from World War 1 joined together to provide relief and to campaign for jobs and housing. “Today, nearly a century later, the Legion continues to stand shoulder to shoulder with all who Serve,” added Mr Simpkins.

“The principles on which the Legion was founded remain as relevant today as they were in the aftermath of World War I – in fact, they are to be found in the principles of the Armed Forces Covenant which the Legion recently helped pass into law.”

As Custodian of Remembrance, the Legion raises public awareness of the sacrifice and service of the British Armed Forces, facilitates Remembrance events to allow the nation to pay its respects and ensures people of all ages can learn of the debt we owe to those who have served and those still serving.

It organises events such as the Two Minute Silence, the Festival of Remembrance and the Cenotaph march past; it maintains the National Memorial Arboretum as the UK’s year-round centre of Remembrance and it reaches 2.5m young people each year with Remembrance learning resources provided freely to schools and youth organisations. It also organises the annual Poppy Appeal to encourage Remembrance while raising much-needed funds for the support of the Armed Forces community.

“Remembrance connects what has gone before with what lies ahead – if we learn by remembering, we can shape a better future,” said Mr Simpkins.

“We saw the UK come together in the unforgettable summer of 2012 through the joyous national celebrations of the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee and the Olympic Games,” he added. “We believe that November 2014 will bring the nation together once again, perhaps to a more solemn purpose, but one no less unifying.”
 

CanteenCowboy

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
#11
As we are British and declared war on the 4th of August, wouldn't commemorations be more suitable on the actual anniversary of the kick off?
 
#12
I'd prefer to see a smaller commemoration in 2014 and a big do in 2018. But that wouldn't suit Dave's plans as he might not be in the seat of power then.
 
#13
SUU23 said:
As we are British and declared war on the 4th of August, wouldn't commemorations be more suitable on the actual anniversary of the kick off?​

.


I'd prefer to see a smaller commemoration in 2014 and a big do in 2018. But that wouldn't suit Dave's plans as he might not be in the seat of power then.

Yes and Yes!!
 

oldbaldy

LE
Moderator
#14
Just watched a piece on BBC lunchtime news with an Arrser looking very serious!!
 
#15
I'd prefer to see a smaller commemoration in 2014 and a big do in 2018. But that wouldn't suit Dave's plans as he might not be in the seat of power then.
My personal vote would be for a small event in 2014, and a major national event in 2016 to mark the Anniversary of the first day of the Somme, the day that absolutely drives home the utter futility of WWI, and a big event for 2018.
 
#16
My personal vote would be for a small event in 2014, and a major national event in 2016 to mark the Anniversary of the first day of the Somme, the day that absolutely drives home the utter futility of WWI, and a big event for 2018.
The culmination of the 2018 event should be the tearing up of the latest EU treaty.
 
T

Taffd

Guest
#17
To be honest, I don't understand the significance of a centenary for this. Why a difference in remembrance between 2013, or 2015, or 1999, or 2019?

To mark a centenary smacks somewhat of celebration. I'd prefer the simple ceremonial remembrance that we see every year.
 
#19
Surely this will only be allowed to pass if they play down the British part in it, big up any minorities that got involved (Senegalese Tirailleurs maybe?) and don't portray "die quadratische Köpfe" as the aggressors, isn't that how we teach history these days?
 
B

benjaminw1

Guest
#20
My personal vote would be for a small event in 2014, and a major national event in 2016 to mark the Anniversary of the first day of the Somme, the day that absolutely drives home the utter futility of WWI, and a big event for 2018.
Bolloux - Stopping an aggressive expansionist European power from conquering the European mainland? This isn't 1965 you Marxist.

Anyhow 1918 should be the central event - When the best trained and equipped British Army ever, last defeated utterly the main force of a superpower on the field of battle.
 

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