WuFlu - Anti Vaxxers

Will you get the Vaccine?


  • Total voters
    285
What is you analysis?

The depopulation of the world isn't going fast enough so they are trying to speed it up?
You know, these "globalists" who all got together, decided they were really good mates after all these years of trying to blow each other up and made a pact to control the "people",

As long as Bill Gates is made plenipotentiary of the world, of course.
 
For those who want to know about vaccine testing, it usually takes 10 years for a traditional vaccine. This article explains it very well. However, I have doubts about the whole COVID hoopla and I do not believe the real powers that be have our best interest at heart.

Vaccine Q&A: How Long Does It Take to Make Vaccines?

Well, aren't you in luck then. Scientists have been working on developing coronavirus vaccines for more than 10 years. So there's nothing at all unusual about the development time span then is there?
 
You know, Hollywood always puts out the truth but in the guise of fantasy and entertainment. It's a spiritual law that 'they' have to tell us what they're planning and if we don't protest it means we've accepted it. Here's a Hollywood film which is closer to reality than you realise.

I see that @Lardbeast made a cameo appearance in the film.

dipso.png
 
For those who want to know about vaccine testing, it usually takes 10 years for a traditional vaccine. This article explains it very well. However, I have doubts about the whole COVID hoopla and I do not believe the real powers that be have our best interest at heart.

Vaccine Q&A: How Long Does It Take to Make Vaccines?


mRNA technology has actually been around a while, about 3 decades. What prevented it from being used in vaccination was they lacked away to keep it protected long enough to get inside of cells and ribosomes, where it can be "read" to create a protein. They (Pfizer & Moderna) overcame this using a lipid-soluble coating.

But it also means that unlike traditional vaccines, where particles are taken up by normal lymph flow and end up in lymph nodes local to the injection site, where foreign molecules are processed and stay outside and in-between cells (the interstitium) - these don't. The mRNA injected can pass between "interstitum" to the blood stream and to the blood-brain barrier. For me at least this is troubling and claims that the actual risk of SARS-CoV-2 outweigh hypothetical risks of the LNP-encapsulated mRNA vaccine do nothing to reassure me.

Depending on where the mRNA ends up, subsequent mRNA-induced spike protein expression might possibly trigger biological reactions we don’t want. It's this unknown that has prompted gene therapy experts like JW Ulm to state to the BMJ:

... pharmacokinetic studies, with independent laboratory confirmation, are essential to ascertain potential cytotoxicity and macroscopic toxicity, especially given the likelihood of booster injections over months or years, since the tissue trafficking patterns of the mRNA vaccine payload will determine which cells and tissues are killed by cytotoxic T-cells in each round.

It's also unclear how relevant previous animal experiments are to answering this question. It might not even be a problem! but it's still an unknown.
 
mRNA technology has actually been around a while, about 3 decades. What prevented it from being used in vaccination was they lacked away to keep it protected long enough to get inside of cells and ribosomes, where it can be "read" to create a protein. They (Pfizer & Moderna) overcame this using a lipid-soluble coating.

But it also means that unlike traditional vaccines, where particles are taken up by normal lymph flow and end up in lymph nodes local to the injection site, where foreign molecules are processed and stay outside and in-between cells (the interstitium) - these don't. The mRNA injected can pass between "interstitum" to the blood stream and to the blood-brain barrier. For me at least this is troubling and claims that the actual risk of SARS-CoV-2 outweigh hypothetical risks of the LNP-encapsulated mRNA vaccine do nothing to reassure me.

Depending on where the mRNA ends up, subsequent mRNA-induced spike protein expression might possibly trigger biological reactions we don’t want. It's this unknown that has prompted gene therapy experts like JW Ulm to state to the BMJ:



It's also unclear how relevant previous animal experiments are to answering this question. It might not even be a problem! but it's still an unknown.
My my what a turn of phrase you have Grandma.
 

endure

GCM
Stolen from the Times...


Doctors and nurses have told of their anger and frustration at not being able to treat seriously ill patients as new figures show that more than 90 per cent of Covid sufferers requiring the most specialist care are unvaccinated.

While the success of the vaccination rollout has reduced the overall impact of Covid-19 on hospitals, intensive care clinicians from across England have spoken out over the continuing pressure they are under.

Between 20 per cent and 30 per cent of critical care beds in England are occupied by Covid patients and three quarters of those have not been vaccinated, according to the latest data up to July this year.

Separately, NHS England said that between July and November more than nine in 10 patients receiving the most specialist care, in which artificial lungs were used to try to save their lives, were unvaccinated.

This is undermining efforts to reduce the backlog of surgeries and the overall NHS waiting list, which had grown to 5.8 million people by the end of September.

Doctors have warned that some transplant operations cannot go ahead and that complex cancer surgeries are being delayed, risking tumours becoming inoperable.

Nicki Credland, chairman of the British Association of Critical Care Nurses, said: “All nurses understand they have to provide non-judgmental care. But what we find difficult is that giving care to patients who have chosen not to be vaccinated has a knock-on effect on other patients. We are still human beings and we still get angry at things that we think aren’t just.

Nicki Credland said that some patients are being rude and even violent towards nurses
“It does take a toll on nurses and I am also hearing from nurses up and down the country about some patients who are being rude, disrespectful and even violent to some nurses trying to look after them.”

She said this was behind high levels of mental health problems in ICU nurses, who are already reporting increased levels of post-traumatic stress after their experiences of the past two years.

Dr Dhruv Parekh, a consultant in critical care at the University Hospitals Birmingham trust, which has Europe’s largest critical care unit with 100 intensive care beds across a whole floor of the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, said: “When you can’t provide the services you feel you need to for the rest of your community and other patients who’ve got life-limiting illnesses, there is a degree of frustration and anger. This is stopping us from doing that really important work and helping the rest of the patients we need to be trying to help.”

The 43-year-old said that it was “infuriating and frustrating” to see patients die when their deaths could have been prevented. “It’s heartbreaking and upsetting because ultimately, when that happens, for the patient and the family, the realisation this potentially could have been prevented dawns.

Dr Dhruv Parekh said that Covid patients had a significantly longer length of stay in critical care than other patients
“It’s painful to see that happen and painful to see families go through the anguish and also the guilt that they will feel. It’s something that we will all carry psychologically for years and years to come.”

Parekh said that Covid patients had a significantly longer length of stay in critical care than other patients, with an average of nine days; longer if they survived the infection. In his unit he said this meant that as many as 100 to 140 other surgeries, which would require stays of only one or two days, had to be delayed each week.

“These are transplants that can’t go ahead. These are patients waiting for complex cancer surgery where every week counts. It could tip them over from an operable cancer to an inoperable cancer,” he said.

Between July and November, NHS England said that 150 patients were referred for extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, or Ecmo, where blood is cycled through an artificial lung machine before returning it to the body. Of these patients, only 6 per cent had been fully vaccinated.

The treatment is usually reserved for younger patients and is a last-ditch effort to buy their bodies time to recover from the virus.

A new antiviral pill will be dispensed to the first Covid patients by Christmas to help tackle the Omicron variant.

The medicine, molnupiravir, will be offered to immunosuppressed, vulnerable patients within two days of a positive test. A “Covid medicines delivery unit” will be set up to ensure the drug is delivered speedily to those who need it.

In total 46.5 million people in the UK have had two doses of Covid-19 vaccine, equivalent to 80 per cent of the population. Almost 20 million have had a third dose, or a booster, just over a third of the population.

Ministers have pledged to ramp up the booster programme owing to the threat of the Omicron variant, with all eligible adults offered a booster by the end of January.

The proportion of unvaccinated patients varies between hospitals around the country. In the West Midlands, leaked NHS data shows that out of 17 ICUs that submitted data to NHS England, 11 had more unvaccinated than vaccinated patients in ICU with Covid, although the numbers will be small.

Three hospitals reported that all the patients in ICU with Covid were unvaccinated: the Royal Derby, Kettering General and the Pilgrim Hospital, Boston, Lincolnshire.
Across the 17 trusts there were 51 unvaccinated people in ICU and 30 fully vaccinated.

Dr Steve Mathieu, from the UK’s Intensive Care Society and a consultant in critical care, said: “One in two Covid-19 patients who require ICU and ventilatory support will die. This is a really important message because we know the vaccines work and there are very few diseases that carry such a high mortality rate.”

He said that staff in ICUs across the country were emotionally drained. “We are used to being busy, but at the moment we’re dealing with a disease that actually is preventable and seeing patients die that shouldn’t is really awful for all of us.”

He urged people who had yet to get vaccinated to do so, saying: “This is not just about yourself, this is about your family, this is about other people. These are decisions that can be made that will affect the ability for someone else to have life-changing treatment.”

Dr Charlotte Summers, professor of intensive care medicine at the University of Cambridge, said: “What we often forget in our emotional reactions is that there’s a structural problem within the NHS. We went into the pandemic with less critical care beds per head of population than almost anywhere in Europe. So we had less resources to start with and then we have had a series of policy decisions made in the UK that are allowing high levels of viral transmission, both of which are combining to put stress on the NHS. None of that is the fault of patients ending up in our ICUs.”

She said that the impact of bed pressures on ICU departments in the NHS and the subsequent cancellations for other patients had a “huge impact” on nurses and doctors.

But she added that there was an issue of trust between some communities and some in positions of authority during the pandemic that had undermined public health messaging on vaccination.

“Managing public health crises of any kind is about trust and not all sections of the community have had trust in the information they’re receiving and that has led to vaccine hesitancy.
“I can understand that people are frustrated. In the field of healthcare, every day some of us make choices that are less than perfect about how we live. We don’t eat the best food, we drive our cars too fast, we don’t exercise enough. Our job is not to judge but to help people the best that we can.”

Doctors also cited the risks of waning immunity with rising numbers of patients who had their second dose more than six months ago yet to get a booster jab.

Professor Helen Bedford of University College London, who has been working for more than 30 years to boost uptake of vaccines, is concerned that many people who think they have already had Covid have not taken up the offer of vaccination.

“Previous infection doesn’t guarantee protection, but people may feel they don’t need vaccination,” she said.

This is a concern for those who believe they were infected early in the pandemic when testing was not available. “Of course if it was an unconfirmed infection it may not have been Covid at all,” she said.
She is also concerned about low uptake among pregnant women. According to the latest surveillance data, only 22 per cent of women who gave birth in August had been vaccinated.

Ministers this weekend launched a new effort to push the benefits of vaccination to pregnant women. In total, 98 per cent of women in hospital with symptoms of Covid-19 have not been vaccinated.

Research has demonstrated that the vaccine is safe for mothers and their babies. NHS England’s chief midwife Professor Jacqueline Dunkley-Bent has written to midwives and GPs urging them to do more to encourage women to get the jab.

In the North West of England, Dr Shondipon Laha said it was “horrifying” to watch unvaccinated patients suffer and that the numbers meant tough decisions having to be made about who could be treated.
He said there was an urgent need for more planning to cope with the increasing amounts of emergency patients being seen in hospitals, adding: “I am seeing people suffer because we can’t accommodate sufficient numbers of patients.”

Dr Aoife Abbey, a council member for the Intensive Care Society who works in the West Midlands, said that while there was a vocal minority of antivaxers the reality of patients in hospital was different.
“There are lots of complex reasons why people are not vaccinated,” she said. “Clear messaging has to be the bottom line.”

On the pressures in ICU departments she said: “It’s awful. We don’t have enough beds or staff. You only need one emergency to come in and it completely derails the operating list for the next day.”
Increasing numbers of patients are having to be moved between hospitals to try and keep beds free, she said.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
mRNA technology has actually been around a while, about 3 decades. What prevented it from being used in vaccination was they lacked away to keep it protected long enough to get inside of cells and ribosomes, where it can be "read" to create a protein. They (Pfizer & Moderna) overcame this using a lipid-soluble coating.

But it also means that unlike traditional vaccines, where particles are taken up by normal lymph flow and end up in lymph nodes local to the injection site, where foreign molecules are processed and stay outside and in-between cells (the interstitium) - these don't. The mRNA injected can pass between "interstitum" to the blood stream and to the blood-brain barrier. For me at least this is troubling and claims that the actual risk of SARS-CoV-2 outweigh hypothetical risks of the LNP-encapsulated mRNA vaccine do nothing to reassure me.

Depending on where the mRNA ends up, subsequent mRNA-induced spike protein expression might possibly trigger biological reactions we don’t want. It's this unknown that has prompted gene therapy experts like JW Ulm to state to the BMJ:



It's also unclear how relevant previous animal experiments are to answering this question. It might not even be a problem! but it's still an unknown.


So, shall we just put your name down for one of the many non mRNA vaccines then?
 
It’s you guys who are killing people by clogging up the hospitals and delaying treatment for others.


Between 14 July and 2 September 2021, 203 patients with Covid-19 were admitted to intensive care units (ICU) across north east London (NEL). Of these, 90% (181) were not fully vaccinated, with most tending to be on average six years younger than patients admitted to ICU who are fully vaccinated.
 
1: We (well I at least, and probably a few others on here) are ex-military. So we are not strangers to excessive consumption of alcohol. I an guessing the nurses are drinking so much due to having put up with the sort of thick as a whale omelette members of the public who won’t get their vaccines.

2: Can you show if this is above or below the levels of obesity/alcoholism for the general public?

3: Finally - that thick bitch just pushed out nothing more than a bit of crappy whataboutism. And rather than engaging in a moments thought you just shared it. Congratulations.
 
1: We (well I at least, and probably a few others on here) are ex-military. So we are not strangers to excessive consumption of alcohol. I an guessing the nurses are drinking so much due to having put up with the sort of thick as a whale omelette members of the public who won’t get their vaccines.

2: Can you show if this is above or below the levels of obesity/alcoholism for the general public?

3: Finally - that thick bitch just pushed out nothing more than a bit of crappy whataboutism. And rather than engaging in a moments thought you just shared it. Congratulations.
Seems I hit a nerve.
Do you smoke too?
 

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