Wrong GCSEs

#1
Ladies and Gentlemen,

Your help please...

A young gentlemen is seeking assistance with becoming an Army Officer. He has the requisite minimum grades etc, but his GCSEs do not include the required Science or Language (he has Maths and English). Anyone know a loophole/precedent around this particular blockade?

Thanks in advance.

barbs
 
#4
Any reason why he can't get stuck into night-school for a year? I chose the 'wrong' GCSEs at age 13 so spent an extra year studying at age 17.
 
#5
Darth_Doctrinus said:
Barbs,

Is he a serving tom? All kinds of ways round this if he is?

Or he could look at the PRMAS route...
Thanks - no he's not a tom. Funnily enough at 14 he didn't know what he wanted to do and didn't focus on science.

Some O2 thief is suggesting he can't be considered because he doesn't have breadth of GCSEs whereas he's about to complete a degree!
 
#6
DozyBint said:
Any reason why he can't get stuck into night-school for a year? I chose the 'wrong' GCSEs at age 13 so spent an extra year studying at age 17.
He is willing to do it and will do it... but wants to start the administrivia ball rolling which the O2 thief is being recalictrant about. As if we have a recruiting surplus...
 
#7
at_ease said:
Money. Maj Gen (The Duke of )Westminster only has 1 GCE O level.
He's TA ;)

msr
 
#8
msr said:
at_ease said:
Money. Maj Gen (The Duke of )Westminster only has 1 GCE O level.
He's TA ;)

msr
I didn't think you could be TA above Brigadier???

Surely a Duke would get an honorary title, so wouldn't be a good example?
 

NAP6W

Old-Salt
#9
StabTiffy2B - If you are worth £6 Billion you can be whatever rank you want to be!!!! :lol: He does not draw his wages - they go to the Army Benevolent Fund. A few years ago they were changing the role of his Sqn to landrovers instead of CVR(T) and he went out and bought, personally, out of his own pocket all the required hardware to equip his blokes.
 
#10
Barbs he should just ask his University Liaison Officer (ULO) who is on the staff of his local CRR.
 
#13
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
so a degree would not over-ride the GCSE stipulation?
I doubt it because if he can't pass GCSE Maths, how likely is it he'd have a degree in Maths? For example.
 
#14
StabTiffy2B said:
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
so a degree would not over-ride the GCSE stipulation?
I doubt it because if he can't pass GCSE Maths, how likely is it he'd have a degree in Maths? For example.
:? That's rather nonsensical! He might have great trouble with languages and be a maths whizz! Also many degrees have no direct link to any subject one may study at GCSE level.
 
#15
DozyBint said:
StabTiffy2B said:
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
so a degree would not over-ride the GCSE stipulation?
I doubt it because if he can't pass GCSE Maths, how likely is it he'd have a degree in Maths? For example.
:? That's rather nonsensical! He might have great trouble with languages and be a maths whizz! Also many degrees have no direct link to any subject one may study at GCSE level.
That's why I said Likely. :roll:
 
#16
msr said:
at_ease said:
Money. Maj Gen (The Duke of )Westminster only has 1 GCE O level.
He's TA ;)

msr
Realise this was probably tongue in cheek but worth pointing out I knew a poor chap who had all the right sort of ticks on the officer training, motivation, good field skills and personal drills, quick on the uptake etc but he didn't have the minimum GCSEs needed and was removed from the training programme.

The point being that this is something to look out for in the TA world as well as the regular. With the phrasing I believe being (as well as the GCSEs) having the capability to engage in higher education. If this has changed since 2004 I'm sure abacus or some other switched on bunny will come put me back in the right box :D.
 
#17
HR monkeys have nothing better to do than turn people away on whatever grounds they can find.

My mate got a first in Physics, but had a D at GCSE English, he got turned down by BAe on graduation... he's now doing a PhD at Cambridge, where he'll no doubt write a stonking good thesis well above GSCE level language.

People should judge you on what you are NOW... not were umpteen years ago.

Tell him to rock into the careers office with his Degree Certificate... if he's got the right attitude, i doubt they'll be able to turn him away so easily.

Let us not forget the great Einstein started off as a Patent Clark...

TB
 
#18
DozyBint said:
StabTiffy2B said:
CRmeansCeilingReached said:
so a degree would not over-ride the GCSE stipulation?
I doubt it because if he can't pass GCSE Maths, how likely is it he'd have a degree in Maths? For example.
:? That's rather nonsensical! He might have great trouble with languages and be a maths whizz! Also many degrees have no direct link to any subject one may study at GCSE level.
A somewhat controversial point of view, mine to follow, but I believe in some cases the education severely limits the abilities of some children to perform.

For instance when I was doing GCSEs, I asked why I couldn't do an intermediate paper and concentrate on the subjects I enjoyed more. The reply was thus "the intermediate paper lets you get a C at the maximum and you have to get a very high mark for it. If you take the higher paper you can get a B for far less marks."

I find at the moment my sister has become a victim of this system. She is between the ability of a higher and intermediate level. Maths just isn't as easy for her as other subjects. So the school has taken the safe option and put her in the intermediate level. How many times have any of us pulled one out of the hat for an exam? For her to not have the chance to do so annoys me, especially when a lot of jobs, not just military, ask for a C grade in GCSE maths, english etc as just a minimum starting point.
 
#19
Don't understand why there is so much indignation on this site about some (fairly modest) minimum standards of education.

A C grade in GCSE English or Maths is not much to ask for. It's a very rudimentary level. D in English > unlikely to be able to write coherent reports. D in Maths > unlikely to be able to perform simple calculations accurately or grasp simple concepts such as in everyday financial matters. Not what we expect from our officers (any more - ?).

Traditionally you can't even matriculate without these qualifications so gawd knows what universities you are referring to from which these people have graduated. It's hardly unreasonable that they should insist on this pretty basic standard.

Science - the case is less clear I admit. Obviously there is no equivalent insistence on history or geography, but again it's compulsory at school (although this has been subject to change) and one should really be able to attain a C.

If your man is properly committed to the career then why doesn't he just do the GCSE. It's not too onerous a hurdle is it really - it's not as if they've suggested he pop away and do a degree in surgery / his chartered accountant's exams...
 
#20
clownbasher said:
If your man is properly committed to the career then why doesn't he just do the GCSE. It's not too onerous a hurdle is it really - it's not as if they've suggested he pop away and do a degree in surgery / his chartered accountant's exams...
I agree.

He is willing to do the required work (as a committed PO should do)... the problem is that the O2 thief won't start the ball rolling therefore he wont get his results on his extra qual until after his degree results therefore won't be able to start Pre-RCB/RCB process until Sep which means he won't be able to get to RMAS until Jan at the earliest. It is infuriating that there is no flexibility in the system...

AAAAAARGH!
 

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