Writing on ENGLISH CANNON - Can anyone translate?

Discussion in 'Military History and Militaria' started by tonywells, Apr 25, 2006.

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  1. I saw an English cannon dated 1676 and on the breech it has the following writing; IOHANES BVRGER HVYS ME FELIT 1676.

    I know the ME FELIT means 'Made By' but I have no idea what the other writing means. Would appreciate if anyone could please assist me with this.

    Cheers!
    Tony
    tonywells82@hotmail.com
     
  2. IOHANES= Johannes or suchlike
    BVRGER= Burger

    Johannes Burger= name of the maker, perhaps?
     
  3. Here's a guess for HVYS: this is a name too and today we might spell it Huis - it sounds a bit Dutch/Flemish to me
     
  4. I think that the Johannes Burger bit means made in Johannesburg (spelling), not made by a bloke called burger.
     
  5. Whats the context? If you saw it in a musuem, have you asked?

    I think its more likely that the mark refers to the maker "The House of Johannes Burger". There were relatively few good cannon makers, and some of the best were in flanders and the Netherlands. Schalch and the Verbruggens are two names that were promminant in cannon casting at Woolwoich.
     
  6. Um! Doubt that some how especially as Johannesburg didn't exist until 1886. :roll:

    Unless of course there is another Johannesburg somewhere in the world??
     
  7. Cutaway

    Cutaway LE Reviewer

    van Riebeeck first landed at what is now Cape Town in 1652 and however much I'd like it to be so they weren't running a gun foundry 24 years later.
    Besides, Jo'burg only dates from the 1886 discovery of gold on the Highveld so it's not from ZA.

    Without seeing it I'd say it was more likely to be Dutch than Flemish as they'd just had a kakhuisvol of wars with the Brits.

    What calibre and length is this piece ?
     
  8. Double post monster strike again for some strange reason ?
     
  9. Yep. Just checked the wiki and you guys are right. In this case, Google is not your friend. :wink:
     
  10. 'Y' is equivalent to 'ij' here in Cloggieland and seems to be interchangable (hence sometimes being one letter short or to many in crosswords :lol: ).
    V=U

    So Hvys = Huijs = House, now just Huis.

    Translation of Pteranadon appears correct!

    The Dutch were excellent gunsmiths their golden age, visit the Delft Leger (army) museum if you happen to be in the Lowlands, it is small but impressive.
     
  11. I'm fairly certain the 'FELIT' should read FECIT - but the translation is the same...just googling around and found this. Not sure if it adds anything tough.
     
  12. Well cosidering Johanessburg didn't exist unti the late 1700's I some how don't think that the northern reaches of the Zulu nation were making canon.....especially in Swedeish! The inscription is that of a Swedish manufacturer and the Royal Crest is most probably that of the king who I belive was Gustav at the time!!!!
     
  13. Well cosidering Johanessburg didn't exist unti the late 1700's I some how don't think that the northern reaches of the Zulu nation were making canon.....especially in Swedeish! The inscription is that of a Swedish manufacturer and the Royal Crest is most probably that of the king who I belive was Gustav at the time!!!!
     
  14. Cutaway

    Cutaway LE Reviewer

    HP, I'd be interested in comparing this crest to others, can you post a picture of it please ?
     
  15. 'Me fecit' is Latin meaning 'made me'

    It is quite feasible to encounter both Latin and the vernacular used in one sentence at this period in time. If it is indeed Dutch then burger could simply mean 'citizen' equivalent to modern day 'burgher.'

    The word 'huis' is more probable although spelling wasn't a fixed system in the 17th century.

    Depending on which case Johannes is in, it could mean 'Johannes made me' (nominative) or 'I was made for Johanes' (dative)

    More info needed though!