Reference Image Wreckers, Recovery & Transporters

Who buys the Antars, collector's or are they brought by reenactors??
Sorry I just had a bit of a chuckle then. Renactors....

This would involve the grottiest coveralls on the planet, Stroh rum and piles and piles of boxes of Herforder Pils. Plus a cavalier disregard for any kind of authority, a wicked sense of fun and a standard of professionalism the like of which was unmatched
 
When I first saw it it was a mess. There must have been a HE near miss on the range as the lower hull on one side was bowed in. Not many would have been brave enough to have tackled that, and rebuild a multibank! He also does it on a shoestring as his money goes to keep the business going. His knowledge on tanks is amazing. I admire what he does immensely.
 
Wot yor talking there guv is an an "EP", an estimated pull and I had 15 years in Gods trade putting this into practice.

From memory, calculated thus:

Ground factor. (GF)
Gradient resistance. (GR)
Damage resistance. (DR)
Safety factor. (SF)

Ground factor obviously refers to the type of ground. Deep mud would be classed as 1/2 of the stricken vehicle weight. (Factor of 2) Dry grass would be 1/7th of the vehicle weight (Factor of 7) and hard standing would have a factor of 1/25th of the vehicle (Factor of 25.) Other types of ground/soil/shite are between those factors.

Gradient is easy Recy Mech maths <45% = 1/3rd vehicle weight and >45% = 2/3rds of the stricken vehicles weight.

Damage is calculated at 1 locked track (set of wheels) at 1/3rd weight of vehicle and 2 locked tracks (sets of wheels) at 2/3rds weight of vehicle.

Weight of vehicle known as (WOV) Safety Factor is adding 25% of all that, to give a total EP. All answers less than 1 ton are rounded up.

Example:

Chieftain tank =50t on a parade square (GF 25) nil damage nil gradient is 50/25 =2 + SF @25% is 0.5t thus giving a total EP of 3t. So it only takes 3t to pull a Chiefy safely across the square.

Another example.

Same tank in a deep mud bog, up a gradient of 50% with a locked track.

GF = 50/2 = 25t
GR = 2/3 WOV = 35t
DR = 1/3 WOV = 17t
total =77t
SF = 77/4 =20t
EP = 97t

As the maximum single winch pull on a Chieftain Armoured Recovery Vehicle (ARV) is only 30t and it carries 2 pulley blocks to enable a 3:1 ratio winch pull, this would give the vehicle a max winch capacity of 60t it clearly isn't up to the task and a second ARV would be needed.

If another Recovery resource was not available, then the shovels come out to reduce the gradient or the oxy-acetylene torches get a dust off to cut the offending track off (we trained in explosive for this as well) as removing a locked track cuts out the damage factor.

Well that's the basics mate. You obviously have to know a whole bunch of military vehicle weights, and of course the limitations of your winching equipment.

I hope that's informative enough.
Thanks for that Arte the very same calcs we were taught at the Plant school at Wainscott , as you're probably aware most of the sapper plant was fitted with a winch of some sort hence the reason we were taught recovery calcs and methods. Only things we didn't do were gas torch cutting or the use of explosive track cutting - as you can imagine give a sapper some pe4 and the casualty would have landed on the moon !
 
I never worked with BARV's but I understand that they didn't have winches and relied on tractive effort. (That's why their tracks were on back to front.)

I also believe that their tractive effort maximum (it's all down to the fixing points of cables and bars)
was a mighty 40t. So three of them working in deep mud could theoretically pull a massive 120t.

Stow the metal detector!

Edited to add. Two BARVS were sent down south and got involved in recovery operations during the Falklands bash in '82. Although one broke down fairly early on.
RNLI lifeboat recovery tractors often have the wheels 'on the wrong side' for the same reason. I walked past one at Littlehampton and the little mental bell rang - 'what's wrong with this picture?'. It took a few seconds to realize what it was.
 
Plus being over 10 ft wide you would have to give everyone 2 days notice to drive it on the road...

They are a lovely drive, supercharged straight 8 Rolld diesel, flat out at about 24 mph. There is not a single component on that truck that was not made in UK.
Do they count as a locomotive if they have a ballast box on them?
 
Talking of chain drive the mighty Pacific Dragon Wagon had the same. Note the chain oiler.

View attachment 376500
Yanks liked their chain drives. Simple, strong, easy to change ratios and with no diff excellent ground clearance. Kenworth offered chain drive well into the 1960s particularly in their logging trucks.

the jury is divided on oilers, some operators used them but many, particularly in the construction business did not. They were messy, did not really get the oil to where it was needed (in the rollers) and mixed with dust and muck to create a damaging abrasive paste.
 
Yanks liked their chain drives. Simple, strong, easy to change ratios and with no diff excellent ground clearance. Kenworth offered chain drive well into the 1960s particularly in their logging trucks.

the jury is divided on oilers, some operators used them but many, particularly in the construction business did not. They were messy, did not really get the oil to where it was needed (in the rollers) and mixed with dust and muck to create a damaging abrasive paste.
Yes, I wondered about the oil acting as an abrasive, especially in dusty or sandy environment.
How does the chain system cater for turns where there is no diff?
 
Yes, I wondered about the oil acting as an abrasive, especially in dusty or sandy environment.
How does the chain system cater for turns where there is no diff?
There is a diff - the drive sprockets are on the end of a jackshaft, essentially a short axle with a diff in the centre. On the Mack the jackshaft and gearbox are one assembly.
 

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