Wrapping BBQ Ribs

#1
I take my ribs seriously. Normally boiling them in a flavoured broth the cooking them under a low heat and basting (home made baste then a sweet BBQ sauce towards the end) them every 10 minutes for the next couple of hours.

After watching BBQ Pitmasters, I thought I'd try cooking them for an hour then wrapping them tightly in foil for a further hour.

This greatly reduced the amount of pissing about and the result was better than my usual effort.

Anyone got any 'top BBQ tips' to share?
 
S

syledis

Guest
#2
for amazing sweetcorn, when you wrap the cobs in tinfoil add a wee drop of full fat coke as it will caremelise and be delicious.
 
#3
I rub mine with American mustard and sprinkle a dry rub on and leave overnight in a zip lock bag, then cook for 3-4 hrs at 130 degrees in a roasting tin wrapped in foil to seal it in, I also put a ramekin of water or apple juice in to keep them moist , then put sauce on and barbecue them to make the sauce nice and sticky- just 10 mins a side is plenty to set the sauce
 
T

Tremaine

Guest
#4
Liquid Smoke/Stubbs Hickory Liquid Smoke. Smear it on your ribs, but it's really strong stuff. Tin foil and slow roasting over wood chips littered with chopped citrus fruits, is for winners. I've seen pans of water on the wood for moisture.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#5
I'd seriously recommend these:

Tesco Rack Of Ribs 500G - Groceries - Tesco Groceries

Currently it's 2 packs for £5. Bargain. Easy to cook too! Microwave them in the packet for 5 mins, then finish on the BBQ. Job done, and they taste lovely.

Better than some of the homemade ribs I've tasted, without any fuss. Nom nom nom nom. Sainsburys do some too, but you have to cook them in the oven for 20 mins, not microwave.

Gen up - try them!
 
#6
Thanks for the tips. One problem we've always had with ribs cooked here is that they aren't anything like those completely deconstructed, moist and sticky "fall off the bone" ones we eat in the USA.

PrinceAlbert - your recommendation noted, but I don't see how that cooking method gives the same result as the other suggestions. Willing to try, although lacking either a Tesco or Sainsbury's here makes it a bit tricky. Have to be Waitrose or M&S, I guess … our CI Co-Op isn't brilliant for meat.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#7
, moist and sticky "fall off the bone"

PrinceAlbert - your recommendation noted, but I don't see how that cooking method gives the same result as the other suggestions.
If you can get them, try them. I was amazed at the result. They literally fall off the bone, and taste spot on. For the price, you really can't go wrong.
 

jarrod248

LE
Gallery Guru
#10
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The char siu sauce is good, you can pre-cook the ribs in a pan of simmering water, when cooled add few tablespoons of the sauce, and some water, mix them around in a freezer bag, leave to marinade and cook. Experiment with some of the other sauces. Garlic and black bean sauce is good as is oyster sauce.
 
P

PrinceAlbert

Guest
#12
I reckon you'll find more meat on some from a butcher, they are also very cheap normally to buy and sometimes cheaper in winter - freeze them.
I don't disagree. But 2 packs for £5, and absolutely **** all effort required, it's a winner :)
 
#13
3-1-1 method. begin by removing the membrane (if possible), then rub the racks with your favourite rub recipe.

3 hours on the (charcoal) grill, uncovered, very low heat, 200-225F. Remove from grill. Place each rack in a foil packet with a couple of ounces of apple juice. Another hour on the gill, higher temperature, say 300F. At the end of this hour, remove the foil, discard the juice, and baste with any BBQ mops etc. Another hour uncovered, 275-300F.

Absolutely fantastic ribs, fall off the bone. Not much work to make them, more waiting. Very economical on the energy too, just a couple of pounds of charcoal.
Are you in the us? I find the skinny little ribs we get in the uk and Australia don't take to cooking more than 3 or so hrs, I have seen those monster racks in the us though with much more meat on to slow cook, nom nom
 
#14
I take my ribs seriously. Normally boiling them in a flavoured broth the cooking them under a low heat and basting (home made baste then a sweet BBQ sauce towards the end) them every 10 minutes for the next couple of hours.

After watching BBQ Pitmasters, I thought I'd try cooking them for an hour then wrapping them tightly in foil for a further hour.

This greatly reduced the amount of pissing about and the result was better than my usual effort.

Anyone got any 'top BBQ tips' to share?
Try the pit masters potato bombs on YouTube, they rock
 
#17
I can vouch for Prince Albert although i prefer to do them in the oven, plenty of meat on them, comes off the bone and a good marinade too, and 2 for a fiver
 
#18
Today the OH came home from our local store with some Waitrose pre-treated 'Boston Butt', in theory to create pulling pork. She has taken all the above on board, and will be cooking … s l o w

We're not planning on sloppy pork paste anyway, but as a joint it will be interesting to see how it works.
Stress factor starts … now ;-)
 
#19
I grew up in Northern Arizona in the mountains - hunting and fishing and cooking what we kill is and was a way of life for me; as well was processing the meat myself. Cut/choice of meat and how it is handled from the very start of the cleaning/butcher process is always important. As is preparation. I like the Baby-backs myself (closer to the spine), the more fat on them the better in my opinion. I do slow boil the entire rack as well for about 1 1/2 - 2 hours in purified water with a few spices - have fun and create your own brew - bullion cubes work well as a base. For the sauce; try this miracle worker, a good Blueberry (or any berry) thick syrup mixed with that spicy Chinese hot-sauce, then together mixed in your favorite BBQ sauce - sweet and tangy - I have a grill, and use mesquite chips as well as charcoal. When rack is done with its boiling process, I let them drip dry, then I use a blotter to 'blot' out the rest of the water meaty side up - and while the meat is still compressed, I add a splash or two of lemon juice, then the first layer of sauce right after that, and it suctions the sauce into the meat, I like to believe that it penetrates better... I then slather both sides of the rack, add a top layer of pepper, wrap rack loosely (to allow for steam expansion) with good grade double-layered aluminum foil - sealed tight. (We have a few rules that me and my partners of 25 years always abide by when on a hunt ( Elk, Deer, Javelina ) - 1) never turn down a drink! 2) Never go into the field with bad asswipe 3) always buy heavy-duty aluminum foil (two of which you can accidently put a finger through). Back to the meat. Lastly - I put it on the grill and 'bake' the entire thing @ med-high for another twenty minutes - I turn mine every 5 minutes. The boiling process doesn't really melt the fats away - it simply breaks down the meat that is now boiled(cooked). The heat from the grill inside the foil loosens the fat/rack up and by the time it is done - the meat is juicy and falls off the bone - cooking times will often vary; I am over a mile-high in altitude. I am fortunate in the fact that here in the southwest; I have access to many awesome BBQ and other authentic Mexican sauces - Lastly; this is just the way I do it; and like the outcome... Hope this helps. Happy grilling!!! J.D. Davis Prescott, Arizona
 

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