Would you mention the TA on your CV?

#1
I'm looking for a job and I'm wondering whether mentioning the TA on my CV is a good idea or not.

I know that you're obliged to inform your employers if you're in the TA but the companies that I'll be applying to aren't my employers (yet!) so I don't think that's an issue.

If I was involved in recruiting I would consider TA membership as a plus point (as it shows leadership qualities, team work, reliability etc). However, in this day and age I suspect that some potential employers would see 'TA' on your CV and just read it as 'could be absent for months on end when he's sent to a sandy place'.

Has anyone had any feedback (good or bad) from potential employers when the TA has been mentioned in interviews?

As I've said, I personally think that the pros outweigh the cons but that's not important - what would the average employer think?
 
#2
I stuck it on my CV and I got a shite load of offers/enquiries. Nowadays employers tend to take a more positive approach to someone who has self discipline and can work in a team environment.
 
#3
McStab said:
I'm looking for a job and I'm wondering whether mentioning the TA on my CV is a good idea or not.

I know that you're obliged to inform your employers if you're in the TA but the companies that I'll be applying to aren't my employers (yet!) so I don't think that's an issue.

If I was involved in recruiting I would consider TA membership as a plus point (as it shows leadership qualities, team work, reliability etc). However, in this day and age I suspect that some potential employers would see 'TA' on your CV and just read it as 'could be absent for months on end when he's sent to a sandy place'.

Has anyone had any feedback (good or bad) from potential employers when the TA has been mentioned in interviews?

As I've said, I personally think that the pros outweigh the cons but that's not important - what would the average employer think?
I think it depends on what type of work you're involved in. I'm currently looking for work myself, the type of which is pretty much entirely office based. I get the impression any outside interest outside of the totally bland/mainstream puts them off.
 
#4
I think that you would be obliged to tell them, as if you subsequently get mobilised, it would probably mean you weren't covered by RFA otherwise.

Nodoubt someone else will put me right :?
 
#6
Tough call guys.

I'm ex-regular and hire and fire people on a regular basis.

Sorry to say I look for stability and commitment and if your already committed to the TA how do you think that makes me feel about employing you.

I understand the discapline and leadership qualitys but for me I need a stable and commited team around me.

I knew when i left the green i would not join the TA for a number of reason but mailnly for me it was about if you are gonna do something make sure you do it very well and do it with single mindedness.

So a job and a family thats what i want to concentrate on and not split my time any further.

Sorry if you dont like it but hey thats my view.
 
#7
put it this way... if you fail to mention in your CV or interviews, that you're a serving member of the TA, then subsequently get the job and get a brown letter drop through your door 2 weeks later... its not goin to look good!
 
#9
I work in recruitment and i would say that it can be seen as both positive and negative so i would not make a big deal of it on your cv, maybe just mention it and say taht it shows dedication but does not interfere with work, and make sure you get a chance to explain it in person as it will come across better from your mouth than on a piece of paper
 
#12
To be fair Duty Cook it seems you may be a bit biased by your service (maybe).

Many TA manage to do both the TA and their "shit" job ( :p ). Without detriment to either. In fact both the TA and the civvie job usually benefits.

Without being obtuse, I am a reg, and I was also able to hold down a position as a Life Guard at Hohne Pool and as a Hohne Garrison Youth Worker (voluntary but the hours were there).

I like to think I managed them all without any interfereing with the other.
 
#13
chocolate_frog said:
To be fair Duty Cook it seems you may be a bit biased by your service (maybe).

Many TA manage to do both the TA and their "s***" job ( :p ). Without detriment to either. In fact both the TA and the civvie job usually benefits.

Without being obtuse, I am a reg, and I was also able to hold down a position as a Life Guard at Hohne Pool and as a Hohne Garrison Youth Worker (voluntary but the hours were there).

I like to think I managed them all without any interfereing with the other.
CF

I appriacte your view and respect it as such.

I hope you would also feel the same way.

This is my view of life and stuff and everything, other people may disagree but hey thats why theres so meny of us.
 
#14
I stick it in the last chapter on interests, my employers couldn't give a monkeys about my reg service let alone my TA.

However I have discovered that many agencies don't bother with the interest section or many don't look at the last page concentrating on most recent employment first
 
#15
Very true, no one pays attention to the interest bit so put it in there, better than when people put, i enjoy going to the cinema! grrrr, people are retards in their cv's!

we only look at relevent work experience really, if you have any at all...
 
#16
I have just employed someone in the Reserve Forces. He has turned out to be an excellent employee but had found it difficult to get a job - principally because he insisted on putting his reserve activities on his CV.

My view was therefore slightly more objective, but it is clear that the majority of non military aware potential employers found it off putting. This is not because they thought 'brown envelopes' (note Chocolate_frog and Hornepils that all mobilisation is VOLUNTARY!) but because the majority do not understand mobilisation or anything else to do with Reserves. It is because they want someone of their ilk, someone dedicated to the job, someone who is normal, and someone who thinks that the job being offered is the be all and end all of life. Service in the TA etc. therefore sends a peculiar signal which they don't understand and you therefore are penalised and slip down the priority list. Even if you are an ex service employer, the theory still applies only this time it is BECAUSE you understand it, not the other way 'round.

In my new employees case, he is an enabler, not part of the mobilisation whirl, and therefore contributes in his own way whilst taking his employment very seriously.

It depends on what you do and for whom. Office based roles tend to be less supportive of reserve service, manual roles more so. It's a broad brush but invariably accurate.

If it were me, I'd mention it deep down in 'other interests', as a few words such as 'member of the reserve forces when time allows' and leave it at that. Your application form will often ask the question and then you should simply state 'yes' or 'TA' (as appropriate). That way, you have fulfilled the compulosory notification piece but not made a song and dance out of it.

Family, work, TA.
 
#18
Depends what transferable skills you have to offer. If you write a functional as opposed to a chronological CV, then your skills from the TA could play a major part and get you the interview. In a chronological CV then it would end up in the "interests" section but can still play a major part. I always push it and have not had negative comment yet.
 
#20
duty_cook said:
Tough call guys.

I'm ex-regular and hire and fire people on a regular basis.

Sorry to say I look for stability and commitment and if your already committed to the TA how do you think that makes me feel about employing you.

I understand the discapline and leadership qualitys but for me I need a stable and commited team around me.

I knew when i left the green i would not join the TA for a number of reason but mailnly for me it was about if you are gonna do something make sure you do it very well and do it with single mindedness.

So a job and a family thats what i want to concentrate on and not split my time any further.

Sorry if you dont like it but hey thats my view.
I don't think it's a question of liking it, I think it's more a question of whether your opinion is legal or not.

As I understand it, you cannot refuse to employ someone on the basis of their reserve commitments and any efforts to do so are discriminatory and in breach of employment law, exactly as if you turned them away for reasons of gender, sexuality, disability ir ethnicity.
 

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