Would you give up £16m to help Gordon Brown?

Would you give up £16m to help out Gordon Brown?

  • Hell Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Hell No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • It would be the moraly right thing to do

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
#1
OK, todays question is:

If yolu were a greedy but incompetent b(w)anker would you give up £16 000 000 just to help out Gordon Brown politically? (Honest answers please)
 
#2
NO
 
#3
Perhaps if he had asked me nicely when we did the deal six months ago, but not now after we did a deal and now he is only kicking up a fuss because the public has found out Gordon cocked it up again.
 
#4
There is a perfectly good arguement to be made for him to give up his pension. He oversaw the bank risking going down the pan.
I just trust EVERY politician who argues for it backs it up by forgoing THEIR pension as they are overseeing the country risking going down the pan.
 
#5
NO
 
#6
Depends. If it was shareholder's cash and I was getting a 'K' or a 'P' in return plus a lucrative seat on a qango then hell yes. It would be my patriotic duty to bung Britain's most successful unelected PM 16 million quid. Should I just make the cheque payable to 'Cash' Gordon?

If we're talking about my own bonus/pension then the one eyed Scottish idiot can bugger off.

Assuming we're talking about the bonus/pension fiasco, Brown and Darling have shown themselves to be fools of the first order. Spending tens of billions of pounds to buy banks in the form of non voting preference shares and thus having no control whatsoever over the company that you now own borders on criminal negligence.

It would have been better to let these banks go belly up then arrange an immediate takeover by a new company. Make all the b(w)ankers reapply for their old jobs in the new company, without the bonuses and pensions.
 
#7
I think this about sums up my thoughts on the sorry state of affairs:

The Daily Mash said:
BROWN REFUSES TO HAND BACK PENSION
GORDON Brown last night dismissed calls to surrender his £123,000 a year pension when he is forced to stop being prime minister next June.

He also has a nice big house which you pay forMr Brown was defiant in the face of City outrage despite the UK government's annual operating loss of £100bn, rising to £1.5 trillion when the write-down of its banking assets is taken into account.

The prime minister said: "I've been building up this pension since I became an MP, it's all completely legal and now you want to take it away because I've been catastrophically bad at my job and you're looking for a scapegoat. What gives?"

He added: "Yes I've been in charge of financial regulation for 12 years, yes I encouraged the housing bubble, and yes I pissed billions up the wall giving pointless jobs to Labour voters, but I fail to see what any of this has to do with me being incredibly well off."

Brown's £3 million pension pot is expected to cast the spotlight on the extravagant retirement packages of other failed politicians including Alistair Darling's inexplicable £1.7m and the £1.5m awarded to John Prescott for being a national scandal for 10 years.

Meanwhile Margaret Beckett has a fund worth £1.7m, someone called 'Hilary Armstrong' has £1.2m and Tessa Jowell has £1m even though no-one has the faintest idea what any of them actually did.

Critics insist Mr Brown has a moral duty to hand back his pension fund as he will inevitably receive a multi-million pound advance for two volumes of eye-gougingly tedious memoirs which will end up in the bargain bucket at WH Smith within a fortnight.

Martin Bishop, head of pension rows at the Institute for Studies, said: "It's a fascinating dynamic. The politicians blame the bankers, the bankers blame the politicians, and the ordinary taxpayer is down on all fours with a confused look on his face, being fucked at both ends."
 
#9
How can a pension of £57,750 PER CALENDAR MONTH ever be justified for anyone? Dropped a bollock there, Cyclops. (Again)
 

seaweed

LE
Book Reviewer
#10
Things to do if one had all that money:

1. Donate large wodge to NuLabour and collect peerage

2. Pay large number of people to parade around London in sandwich boards with 'Balls to Gordon Mugabe' written on them

3. Buy elegant secluded property somewhere abroad and sell up completely in UK so that HMRC cannot benefit

4. Give it all anonymously to RBL and NSPCC and say NOTHING about doing that

5. Put it all on a horse


Further proposals welcome.
 
#11
#12
seaweed said:
Things to do if one had all that money:

1. Donate large wodge to NuLabour and collect peerage
Sadly, peerages are no longer for sale after the persecution of dear Tony. How about a job as Director of Public Prosecutions? No law degree? No problem.

seaweed said:
2. Pay large number of people to parade around London in sandwich boards with 'Balls to Gordon Mugabe' written on them
That would constitute a serious terrorist incident in the capital. Not only would your employees get stopped, searched and nicked but you could expect a 3am visit from the anti-terrorist squad, as they're finished beating a confession out of Damien Green.

Gordon would also invoke the Civil Contingencies Act to delay the next election until the day after hell freezes over.

seaweed said:
3. Buy elegant secluded property somewhere abroad and sell up completely in UK so that HMRC cannot benefit
Dream on. Having 'persuaded' small countries like Luxembourg and the Channel Islands to 'share their data' on UK tax exiles, Gordon now has his sights set on Switzerland.

With all that Nazi gold still gathering dust in Swiss bank vaults a total land/air blockade by the EU is fully justified until the evil, fascist Swiss cough up. Gotta fund those bankers' pensions with something dontcha know.

seaweed said:
4. Give it all anonymously to RBL and NSPCC and say NOTHING about doing that
As soon as the Charity Commission finds out, you'll be demented by phone calls and home visits by Lord Levy who'll be soliciting donations for the party.

seaweed said:
5. Put it all on a horse
Make sure you use an offshore, internet bookie else Gordon will have his cut.

seaweed said:
Further proposals welcome.
Have you thought of hiring a hit man? Just a thought. Not that I'd be inciting you to murder any one eyed Scottish idiots or anything like that.
 
#13
Does that include his noble sacrifice in foregoing his share entitlement in favour of hard cash now that the bank he used to run is tanking in the stock Market?

Ultimately, he can't be legally forced to give it up as his employer agreed to the terms of his leaving. Ultimately, the government can legally demand the bailout cash back from that same employer. Lets see if the cunts still think life is so peachy once everybody starts to exercise their legal prerogatives.
 
#14
maxi_77 said:
Perhaps if he had asked me nicely when we did the deal six months ago, but not now after we did a deal and now he is only kicking up a fuss because the public has found out Gordon cocked it up again.
Does gordon brown realy get involved in that level of detail?

Talk about Micro Management!!

Dave
 

OldSnowy

LE
Moderator
Book Reviewer
#15
Having read the letter on the 'Order-Order' link (a few posts above), and also seeing what a mahoosive pension Prescott spammed from us for doing feck all, I think the man is entitled to hang on to it - at least until the Government agree to refuse their own pensions as well, which I find unlikely, money-grubbing expense-fiddlers that they mostly are.



I also can't imagine that we took any pension away from Gen Percival, or any other great military failures, after all!
 
#16
Devilishdave said:
maxi_77 said:
Perhaps if he had asked me nicely when we did the deal six months ago, but not now after we did a deal and now he is only kicking up a fuss because the public has found out Gordon cocked it up again.
Does gordon brown realy get involved in that level of detail?

Talk about Micro Management!!

Dave
In my book the severance package for the CEO is a significant part of the deal. If Gordon or his senior men were not aware of something as signifcant as that or did not care about it it does indicate they lost sight of the problem, not a very good thing.
 
#18
There is nothing noble about Bruin or his government.

He is un-elected. We didn't vote him in. Read up on your history and it starts to sound like robin hood and the sheriff of nottingham - the great pretender.

£16m will not solve the economic situation. He is just news until Jade kicks it. Then it will be forgotton about.

Message Ends.
 

mercurydancer

LE
Book Reviewer
#19
In the circumstances I dont blame Fred the shred for telling them to eff off. Its stable door and horse time.

The problem lay a little while back, when the deal was done. It should have been simple.. Sir Fred... you're fired. The Government own Lloyds now you and you get jack.

Every time the Government try something (I just dont blame Swampy... its all of them) then they screw up incredibly so. They are totally incompetent and cannot take the action they need to take.

Prescott just makes me want to vomit, which is something he obviously forgot to do. He is just diverting the public attention to a scapegoat who will be forgotten about soon. I am cynical enough for me to beleive that Sir Fred took on the toxic debts and was the fall guy for part of the financial crisis.

I will make an offer to Broon and Capt Darling... You can blame me for the entire banking crisis and I'll take on all that responsiblility for about £25 grand a month.. cheap at half the price. ANd I wont write any embarrassing letters to Ministers.
 

maguire

LE
Book Reviewer
#20
I'd give it up.


but I'd donate it to the Monster Raving Loony Party before I gave it to that one eyed cnut's apprentice.
 

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