Would someone please help this dear lady

Discussion in 'The NAAFI Bar' started by FaceLikeAPingPongBall, Oct 23, 2007.

Welcome to the Army Rumour Service, ARRSE

The UK's largest and busiest UNofficial military website.

The heart of the site is the forum area, including:

  1. Done and done.
     
  2. oldbaldy

    oldbaldy LE Moderator Good Egg (charities)
    1. Battlefield Tours

    Dam, I thought it was only me she offered it to.
     
  3. http://www.met.police.uk/fraudalert/419.htm

    419 Fraud / Advance fee fraud
    SCD6 Economic and Specialist Crime OCU is issuing warnings, as part of a crime prevention initiative against a type of fraud commonly know as 'West African' or '419' advance fee fraud. This section of the Metropolitan Police website will serve as a resource providing warnings and advice to help potential victims protect themselves as well as publishing important legal information.

    What is West African "419" fraud?
    Advance fee fraud or '419' fraud (named after the relevant section of the Nigerian Criminal Code) is a popular crime with the West African organised criminal networks. There are a myriad of schemes and scams - mail, faxed and telephone promises designed to facilitate victims parting with money. All involve requests to help move large sums of money with the promise of a substantial share of the cash in return.

    This type of scam, originally known as the "Spanish Prisoner Letter", has been carried out since at least the sixteenth century via ordinary postal mail. These scams have come to be associated in the public mind with Nigeria due to the massive proliferation of such confidence tricks from that country since the mid-eighties, although they are often also carried out in other African nations, and increasingly from European cities with large Nigerian populations, notably London and Amsterdam.

    The laws from Section 419 and laws in place in other jurisdictions criminalising the offences do not scare away the criminals who profit from these crimes. The stakes and profits are simply too high and many government officials are believed to be involved with the criminal gangs.

    Victim's individual monetary losses can range from the low thousands into multi-millions. True figures are often impossible to ascertain, because many victims, embarrassed by their naiveté and feeling personally humiliated, do not report the crime to the authorities. Others, having lost so much themselves, become "part of the gang" recruiting more victims from their own country of residence. There are tragic cases of victims being unable to cope with the losses and committing suicide.

    See also:
    How the fraud works
    How they find victims
    What to do if...
    Meetings
    Magic money - Wish wash
    Useful Contacts
    Credit Reference Agencies
    Contact Us
    If you believe you might be being set up as a target for fraud or if you are an investigator and you think you might be dealing with this type of activity then please contact the SCD6 Economic and Specialist Crime OCU at the address or by e-mail.
     
  4. So what you're saying Poppy, is that you think that the original e-mail could be some sort of scam?

    After fifteen or so years of the Internet, thank the Lord that there are sharp-minded people like you around. Without your helpful post I might have fallen for it.

    :roll:
     
  5. Poppy,you're saying it's not true? OMG
     
  6. Nice advice Poppy, but should we not be happily mocking those that are greedy (and/or stupid) enough to fall for these. These scams only work because some people think that you can get something for nothing (think pyramid scams). If you fall for one of these you deserve to have your bank account cleaned out.
     
  7. Isn't that a bit like say to a judge, she was wearing a short skirt and asking for it?
     
  8. sorry - only just noticed this is in the naafi bar :roll:

    thought you may have liked to know this is a very common fraud attempt - you would think they could dream up something new by now
     
  9. This is probably a more relevant scam which we should all be aware of, especially as so many homes are empty during the day:

    Read on and take heed:



    A card is posted through your door from a company called PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and that you need to contact them on 0906 6611911 (a premium rate number). DO NOT call this number, as this is a mail scam originating from Belize .

    If you call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed £15 for the phone call.

    If you do receive a card with these details, then please contact Royal Mail Fraud on 02072396655 or,

    ICSTIS (the premium rate service regulator) at www.icstis.org.uk or telephone 0800 500212.
     
  10. This is probably a more relevant scam which we should all be aware of, especially as so many homes are empty during the day:

    Read on and take heed:



    A card is posted through your door from a company called PDS (Parcel Delivery Service) suggesting that they were unable to deliver a parcel and that you need to contact them on 0906 6611911 (a premium rate number). DO NOT call this number, as this is a mail scam originating from Belize .

    If you call the number and you start to hear a recorded message you will already have been billed £15 for the phone call.

    If you do receive a card with these details, then please contact Royal Mail Fraud on 02072396655 or,

    ICSTIS (the premium rate service regulator) at www.icstis.org.uk or telephone 0800 500212.
     
  11. I think there is a bit of a difference between someone wearing clothes which attract unwanted attention and someone who greedily thinks that they will get something for nothing. Seems quite a clear difference. Anyway this is the NAAFI so I hope that anyone who falls for this loses every penny.
     
  12. Biped

    Biped LE Book Reviewer

    That's nothing. I've had visits (regular) from people claiming to want to talk to me about God.

    When they've got themselves in the front door, I've found myself making donations to their church, AND going to it!

    I was told to expect the coming of The Lord and that The End Times are Nigh!! Well, they had me frightened alright; the end of the world is what they were talking about.

    I put all my money in to their coffers to ensure that I was one of the lucky ones that got saved, but, and it's a big BUT - this Lord bloke hasn't turned up to do the job.

    I've been waiting around now for the world to come crashing down, only to have myself saved at the last minute by some geezer who's going to leap from the sky and make me one of his 'special' people.

    Can I get my money back if he doesn't turn up to do the work?
     
  13. old_fat_and_hairy

    old_fat_and_hairy LE Book Reviewer Reviews Editor

    We should all extend the hand of friendship to this lady. She is obviously in sore need of help, otherwise why would she go begging to strangers for assistance? I will take it upon myself to counsel and comfort her in her hour of need, but without sending money or details, other than the ones I obtained when a bloke dropped his wallet near me.
    Poppy is to be thanked and commended for her public-spirited advice. We treasure her.
     
  14. I've emailed her and said I am a nudist and only deal with fellow nudists, so if she would send me a picture of herself in the nude I would agree to help her.