Would Proportional Representation be the way forward.

neil82

Old-Salt
problem with PR is who actually decides who the MP is going to be, at least with the system we have now the voters have some influence over who gets the job, who or how would it be decided under PR who an MP would be for a given constituency.
PR would also remove any sort of relationship with the character of an area, north wales has the PC idiots, south wales has the labour strongholds, would PR mean that a party could decide that even though here a cabbage with a Plaid badge would get full support the party could decide that this area was not for them and stick their cabbage up to run or stand for Powys not Gwynedd, total non starter for me, stick with the system we have just sort out the corrupt postal and double voting shit
 
problem with PR is who actually decides who the MP is going to be, at least with the system we have now the voters have some influence over who gets the job, who or how would it be decided under PR who an MP would be for a given constituency.
PR would also remove any sort of relationship with the character of an area, north wales has the PC idiots, south wales has the labour strongholds, would PR mean that a party could decide that even though here a cabbage with a Plaid badge would get full support the party could decide that this area was not for them and stick their cabbage up to run or stand for Powys not Gwynedd, total non starter for me, stick with the system we have just sort out the corrupt postal and double voting shit

Needs some sort of sift, like the Spams have with their primaries... as it stands, you need appx. 20k votes to get a Plaid MP and millions to get a UKIP or Green.

Not right.
 

Bad Smell

Old-Salt
In Oz, there is two party preferential or whatever it is called. It works with preferences going to the the two candidates that receive the greatest number of votes. This is for the federal House of Representatives for each electorate.

When you vote, you have the option of placing number 1 (and leaving the rest blank) in the candidate you prefer for which the preferences will be automatically calculated or you can number each candidate individually. So when the person with the most votes (unless it is over 50% which it rarely is) is compared to the person with the second most votes, they receive the preferences of the other candidates.

For instance if candidate A receives 35% and B receives 30%, then they count who is number 2 on the ballot paper for the others candidates. If candidate B receives 21% of the other candidates votes (the other 35%) then candidate B wins with a margin of 51%. Essentially a two horse race. Simples.

Personally I would prefer first past the post or who gets the most votes wins the seats. That way you get who you vote for as some candidates are strong performers in their local areas but often have to bow to the party's preferences.

Then there is the federal Senate for each state where you can be lazy and just vote for a party and they decide who goes in there or you can vote for individual candidates. If you are lazy and vote for the party then this is where the real oxygen thieves come from.

The State elections are similar but in Queensland they voted to discontinue the Senate many years ago and so you have only one house of politicians where the majority passes through whatever legislation they want with no Upper House to act as a filter for stupid legislation.

All voting is compulsory so in a way it provides artificial support for some parties as a lot of people couldn't be arsed who gets in.

When voting for the Senate there can easily be upwards of seventy candidates, so I enjoy numbering each one individually. That way I know my vote has been counted.

Democracy, ya gotta love it.
 
Changes to FPTP, AV, PR or anything else is pretty meaningless unless

1. Voting becomes compulsory

2. None of the above gets added to ballot papers.

Seriously, we need around 800 members of the HoL and a further 650 MP's ?

I don't think so.

Any meaningful reform must start at with the top, with the HoL, then through the HoC and then the electoral method.
 

Boxer96

Old-Salt
This year I voted for the first time in Germany (Bavarian state elections).
I may get the chance to vote in a General Election soon if, as looks likely, the new SPD joint leadership decide to leave the coalition with CDU/CSU.
The GE system is based on proportional representation:
"Germans elect their members of parliament with two votes. The first vote is for a direct candidate, who ought to receive a plurality vote in their electoral district. The second vote is used to elect a party list (regional list) in each state as established by its respective party caucus. The Bundestag comprises seats representing each electoral district, with the remainder of seats being allocated to maintain proportionality based on the second vote."
There is also the "5% threshold" Seats in the German Bundestag distributed by regional lists are only given to parties passing a five percent electoral threshold of the federally valid second votes.
gives a great explanation.
 

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