Working in the Falkland Islands?

rmn

LE
We are now on work day 12 of the conversion of the old locker room into the new changing room. View attachment 672056

Not sure exactly where the new storage units are, think some are on Island but next UK boat is not till mid July so no need to rush.
Must be a lot to store as the builders have been making a lot of noise directly above our office. Does the sound of their incessant drilling worry your punters?
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Most of the structural work on the lab was done before I arrived, so September last year.
This included cutting out the space for the larger fire resistant door.
So time to fit the new frame. Neither these nor the doors can be adjusted because that would invalidate their fire rating.
Should be smooth enough.
Except this refurbishment has snagged at every conceivable point.

Workmen removed old door, frame and filler.

Workmen try to fit new frame.

Hole carefully measured and cut out back in September is too small. Just a few millimetres but it's a concrete lintel.

Decide that to use grinder or saw would be too dusty.

Hammer and bolster chisel time!
received_1064697341118480.jpeg


Note gaps in new flooring as it was laid around temporary frame.

received_535088244983049.jpeg


Pencil line above opening is height it should actually be to receive the new frame.

Once again, a job expected to take a day will now stretch to three!
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Must be a lot to store as the builders have been making a lot of noise directly above our office. Does the sound of their incessant drilling worry your punters?

Not as much as the screams. :)
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Greenhouse back up and running then?

The porch is still producing them.

UK seeds came up early and confused about the seasons, they went through a Falklands summer and are now entering a U.K. one.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
They used to do pork but EU regulations finished that idea
...because they can't sell the meat, and I don't think they're worth the feed cost.

Excuse my ignorance, but:

What has the EU got to do with it? FI is a long, long way from Europe, and as British the EU still has no sway over what British farms produce (OK, they may not allow us to sell it in Europe, but that's for a different thread). Why can't it be sold locally? Born, reared and butchered on the Islands, I would be amazed if the market didn't want pork, bacon, gammon, trotters etc
 

PFGEN

GCM
Excuse my ignorance, but:

What has the EU got to do with it? FI is a long, long way from Europe, and as British the EU still has no sway over what British farms produce (OK, they may not allow us to sell it in Europe, but that's for a different thread). Why can't it be sold locally? Born, reared and butchered on the Islands, I would be amazed if the market didn't want pork, bacon, gammon, trotters etc

I suspect the Island may already be enjoying some of these porcine delicacies. Especially when word goes round that Peppa128 is about to meat her end and Peppa128 was never on the books.
 

Fang_Farrier

LE
Kit Reviewer
Excuse my ignorance, but:

What has the EU got to do with it? FI is a long, long way from Europe, and as British the EU still has no sway over what British farms produce (OK, they may not allow us to sell it in Europe, but that's for a different thread). Why can't it be sold locally? Born, reared and butchered on the Islands, I would be amazed if the market didn't want pork, bacon, gammon, trotters etc

When the first settlers came, Chelsea Pensioners type in fact, though bearing in mind that they were in their 40s. Each was allocated a plot of land with a prefabricated cottage (many of which are still standing and inhibited)
The land was big enough for a vegetable patch, a peat shed, an outhouse and a meat shed.
There was the expectation that every house would have a pig, mainly fed on food scraps that they would butcher and smoke/salt as necessary.

Over time the relative abundance of mutton and beef reduced the culture for eating pork and chicken.

There's lots of locally produced chicken and duck eggs but no sales of fresh chicken or duck.
 

rmn

LE
When the first settlers came, Chelsea Pensioners type in fact, though bearing in mind that they were in their 40s. Each was allocated a plot of land with a prefabricated cottage (many of which are still standing and inhibited)
The land was big enough for a vegetable patch, a peat shed, an outhouse and a meat shed.
There was the expectation that every house would have a pig, mainly fed on food scraps that they would butcher and smoke/salt as necessary.

Over time the relative abundance of mutton and beef reduced the culture for eating pork and chicken.

There's lots of locally produced chicken and duck eggs but no sales of fresh chicken or duck.
I like the idea of the cottages "still standing and inhibited".
 
Excuse my ignorance, but:

What has the EU got to do with it? FI is a long, long way from Europe, and as British the EU still has no sway over what British farms produce (OK, they may not allow us to sell it in Europe, but that's for a different thread). Why can't it be sold locally? Born, reared and butchered on the Islands, I would be amazed if the market didn't want pork, bacon, gammon, trotters etc
It was explained to me that the pigs can't just be reared on swill. The have to be fed assured food so to speak for a period of time before slaughter ie grain. Grain must be imported and the cost outweighs any profit margin. EU was blamed but I am happy to be corrected on who lays the standards.
 

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