Wood turning question?

I only ever do this on very large turnings (usually face turnings), and that is usually just to ensure that the item doesn't foul the lathe bed.

I have a love/hate relationship with my lathe. I hate starting the piece, hence the bandsawing. I also hate the chips alles über. But I love the results. Haven’t got it set up at present, it’s slowly rusting in my shed. I have to say I’m impressed with what you ‘turn out‘ :)
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
I have a love/hate relationship with my lathe. I hate starting the piece, hence the bandsawing. I also hate the chips alles über. But I love the results. Haven’t got it set up at present, it’s slowly rusting in my shed. I have to say I’m impressed with what you ‘turn out‘ :)

Get it set up, cleaned up, de-rusted and waxed. Then get to it. In all honesty my lathe is less about the art of turning, but more about my own mental health. The turned items (many of which I sell) are almost a by-product. It is a very addictive pastime though, and not cheap if you want decent kit. My favourite part is when it comes to doing the finishing. The sanding, the sealing, waxing and polishing. Yes, it's messy, but it's my workshop and I don't care!

And thanks for the compliment! :)
 
Thanks all.
I went down the youtube rabbit hole and ended up watching some blokes turning stuff. Not all knocked the corners off prior to starting the job. The vids I saw didn't seem to show kick back of any sorts, blokes who know what they are doing I suppose.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Thanks all.
I went down the youtube rabbit hole and ended up watching some blokes turning stuff. Not all knocked the corners off prior to starting the job. The vids I saw didn't seem to show kick back of any sorts, blokes who know what they are doing I suppose.

Did you check out Mike Waldt? He does a beginners guide which you may find helpful.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Thanks, but I'm not looking to start turning.(I don't think I have the skills or patience!) Got sidetracked whilst looking for different videos!

There was me thinking that we had a new convert!
 
I have a love/hate relationship with my lathe. I hate starting the piece, hence the bandsawing. I also hate the chips alles über. But I love the results. Haven’t got it set up at present, it’s slowly rusting in my shed. I have to say I’m impressed with what you ‘turn out‘ :)
42B3095C-D544-4088-9C15-4088C279D331.jpeg

i picked up a 50yr old Coronet Minor ‘10 in one’ on FB marketplace for no money. It has a planer and table saw attached, so many options to make sawdust man glitter...
 
View attachment 473980
i picked up a 50yr old Coronet Minor ‘10 in one’ on FB marketplace for no money. It has a planer and table saw attached, so many options to make sawdust man glitter...

There was a time when I would have agreed with you. However, now I have a side business woodworking, sawdust is the enemy. My molding machines will create 55 gallons of chips in about 500 linear feet of product. It takes about 20 minutes to run 500 ft. The molding shop (AKA garage :) ) has two of them in it. My main shop in the basement has another one, plus planers, tablesaw, router table, CNC router, sanding machines, bandsaw etc.

Both shops have large cyclone dust collectors in them, an air filter in the main shop, and Lord knows how many vacuums.

I don’t much care for sawdust :)
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I’m seriously considering taking this wood turning up as a hobby, first off I have to clear a room in my annex which is used a dumping ground and if I can ge5 that done this summer I will have a nice tidy room to start my hobby.
Ive got one question and it sounds daft, I’ve seen a few videos and obviously admired @Legs work read a book or two but I don’t where to source the wood, it’s not like you can pop down to the timber merchants and get some nice hard wood for turning so where is the best place to get this material?
 
it’s not like you can pop down to the timber merchants and get some nice hard wood for turning so where is the best place to get this material?
Why not? It's a long time since I visited a real timber merchant (as opposed to a builders' merchant that sells timber) but I recall sniffing the aromas of the different woods available. In Middlesbrough in the 60s, the timber merchant (Leader's) was next to the leather merchant (Leng's) - lovely!
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
I’m seriously considering taking this wood turning up as a hobby, first off I have to clear a room in my annex which is used a dumping ground and if I can ge5 that done this summer I will have a nice tidy room to start my hobby.
Ive got one question and it sounds daft, I’ve seen a few videos and obviously admired @Legs work read a book or two but I don’t where to source the wood, it’s not like you can pop down to the timber merchants and get some nice hard wood for turning so where is the best place to get this material?

Most Timber Merchants these days are set up for trade, and really can't be bothered with someone wanting to have a wander round to find the precise piece of wood that they want. And even those that do allow it won't deal in the very small (relatively) pieces and quantities you would be after, and very, very few will have the types of wood you want. They'll carry Fir, Spruce, Pine, Oak and maybe something like Ash. My advice would be to scour Ebay using keywords like 'Turning Blanks'. You will find many people sell prepared blanks in boxes by weight or quantity of blanks, mostly a 'lucky dip' type thing. Alternatively you can go the slightly safer, pickier but slightly more expensive route by contacting one of the woodcraft stores, which are also the places to order your tools, equipment, abrasives and finishes. Below are links to a few that I use:

Yandles
Axminster
Turners Retreat

Any of these three supply prepared blanks in a number of sizes and shapes, bundles, and a huge range of species that you will not be able to get at a Timber Merchant or DIY store (although B&Q do sell a few Oak turning blanks - or at least the one in Edinburgh does. It's overpriced though). Try to avoid Pine initially as it needs a bit of practice to avoid tear out and splitting.

Additionally I tend to scrounge logs if I see a tree surgeon at work. This means though that they need to dry for two to five years, you'll need a chainsaw and a decent size bandsaw to process them, plus somewhere under cover to dry them. I use a Wheelie Bin/Garden Storage Cupboard like this:

Capture.JPG


I'm more than happy to give more advice if you need it. However, my strongest piece of advice (apart from wearing an impact resistant faceshield - which is essential) is to find a local woodcraft club you can join. They usually have demos and people with lots and lots of experience)
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Most Timber Merchants these days are set up for trade, and really can't be bothered with someone wanting to have a wander round to find the precise piece of wood that they want. And even those that do allow it won't deal in the very small (relatively) pieces and quantities you would be after, and very, very few will have the types of wood you want. They'll carry Fir, Spruce, Pine, Oak and maybe something like Ash. My advice would be to scour Ebay using keywords like 'Turning Blanks'. You will find many people sell prepared blanks in boxes by weight or quantity of blanks, mostly a 'lucky dip' type thing. Alternatively you can go the slightly safer, pickier but slightly more expensive route by contacting one of the woodcraft stores, which are also the places to order your tools, equipment, abrasives and finishes. Below are links to a few that I use:

Yandles
Axminster
Turners Retreat

Any of these three supply prepared blanks in a number of sizes and shapes, bundles, and a huge range of species that you will not be able to get at a Timber Merchant or DIY store (although B&Q do sell a few Oak turning blanks - or at least the one in Edinburgh does. It's overpriced though). Try to avoid Pine initially as it needs a bit of practice to avoid tear out and splitting.

Additionally I tend to scrounge logs if I see a tree surgeon at work. This means though that they need to dry for two to five years, you'll need a chainsaw and a decent size bandsaw to process them, plus somewhere under cover to dry them. I use a Wheelie Bin/Garden Storage Cupboard like this:

View attachment 484208

I'm more than happy to give more advice if you need it. However, my strongest piece of advice (apart from wearing an impact resistant faceshield - which is essential) is to find a local woodcraft club you can join. They usually have demos and people with lots and lots of experience)
Thanks Legs, much appreciated, all the best.
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Well I’ve nearly put my band saw together, it’s on it’s stand and it’s a big bugger fixing the table is going to be a job, getting the wife to hold it steady when I screw in the bolts, hope to feck she doesn’t start thinking of the life cover I have. Oh and my lathe arrives this afternoon.
Once I’ve managed to sent all this up I’ll post a few pictures of my new office.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Well I’ve nearly put my band saw together, it’s on it’s stand and it’s a big bugger fixing the table is going to be a job, getting the wife to hold it steady when I screw in the bolts, hope to feck she doesn’t start thinking of the life cover I have. Oh and my lathe arrives this afternoon.
Once I’ve managed to sent all this up I’ll post a few pictures of my new office.

I'd love to see a video of you putting it all together. Complete with the soundtrack of your curses, rants and sound of you kicking the thing as you find you've put the wrong bolt in the piece you constructed and fitted to another piece that means you need to strip the whole thing down again and start from the first page of the manual.... :frustrated::threaten:;)
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
I'd love to see a video of you putting it all together. Complete with the soundtrack of your curses, rants and sound of you kicking the thing as you find you've put the wrong bolt in the piece you constructed and fitted to another piece that means you need to strip the whole thing down again and start from the first page of the manual.... :frustrated::threaten:;)
I was thinking of that myself. I managed to put the stand on by laying it down, I got a log out of the shed heaved the saw up and gently manoeuvred it onto the log so the base was off the ground. Next I positioned the base and lined up the fixing bolts and bingo it slid on no problem, I quickly slipped on the washers and nuts hand tightened them and stood back to admire my work.


FECK FECK AND TREBLE FECK!! I put the blasted stand on back to front, off it came rotated it so the wheels were in the correct position but would it slide gracefully into position this time? NO IT BLOODY WELL DIDNT, STOPF FECKING LAUGHING!
Eventually I got it on and manage to stand it up and I must say it looked rather impressive. I went back into the house and had a lovely coffee basking in my glory..

Part two, the lathe arrived about an hour ago. Three big boxes on one big pallet dropped off just outside the annex, thank you kind man.
Went to lift the first box after removing all the cling wrap, feck thats heavy, opened box , let’s remove some items and take them in separately shall we. Oh dear it was one leg! I managed by myself it reminded me of going on holiday lugging the wife’s over packed suitcase! Next the other leg. Then the lathe itself, no chance luckily enough I had been doing my homework and slid the tail stock, banjo and tool rest and headstock off the bed and took them in.
Right, now for the bed, 1 2 3, up, feck the bastard pallet came up with it, it was only bolted to the damn thing.
Any how after much cursing the bed was removed from pallet and lifted in. It’s all in pieces, BITS AND FECKING PIECES as the song goes and it can bloody well stay like that till tomorrow.
At least it wasn’t raining and for that I am grateful. As I type it’s started to piss down.

Tune in next week for the next thrilling episode of Gout Man goes wood turning.:grin:
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
I was thinking of that myself. I managed to put the stand on by laying it down, I got a log out of the shed heaved the saw up and gently manoeuvred it onto the log so the base was off the ground. Next I positioned the base and lined up the fixing bolts and bingo it slid on no problem, I quickly slipped on the washers and nuts hand tightened them and stood back to admire my work.


FECK FECK AND TREBLE FECK!! I put the blasted stand on back to front, off it came rotated it so the wheels were in the correct position but would it slide gracefully into position this time? NO IT BLOODY WELL DIDNT, STOPF FECKING LAUGHING!
Eventually I got it on and manage to stand it up and I must say it looked rather impressive. I went back into the house and had a lovely coffee basking in my glory..

Part two, the lathe arrived about an hour ago. Three big boxes on one big pallet dropped off just outside the annex, thank you kind man.
Went to lift the first box after removing all the cling wrap, feck thats heavy, opened box , let’s remove some items and take them in separately shall we. Oh dear it was one leg! I managed by myself it reminded me of going on holiday lugging the wife’s over packed suitcase! Next the other leg. Then the lathe itself, no chance luckily enough I had been doing my homework and slid the tail stock, banjo and tool rest and headstock off the bed and took them in.
Right, now for the bed, 1 2 3, up, feck the bastard pallet came up with it, it was only bolted to the damn thing.
Any how after much cursing the bed was removed from pallet and lifted in. It’s all in pieces, BITS AND FECKING PIECES as the song goes and it can bloody well stay like that till tomorrow.
At least it wasn’t raining and for that I am grateful. As I type it’s started to piss down.

Tune in next week for the next thrilling episode of Gout Man goes wood turning.:grin:


Oh shit! I needed a good laugh today and so thank you for providing it!

Yep, cast legs are not light. Put the legs on the lathe laying it down on the back of the bed, bolting it and then get some help lifting. It's chuffin' heavy. Now, can I say those infamous, hated words?



Can I?




Please?




Screw it, I'm going to: 'TOLD YOU SO!!!'
 

Gout Man

LE
Book Reviewer
Oh shit! I needed a good laugh today and so thank you for providing it!

Yep, cast legs are not light. Put the legs on the lathe laying it down on the back of the bed, bolting it and then get some help lifting. It's chuffin' heavy. Now, can I say those infamous, hated words?



Can I?




Please?




Screw it, I'm going to: 'TOLD YOU SO!!!'
I put the remaining bits and bobs on the saw today, checked a video, ran through the adjustments of the blade guides etc, checked the top wheel making sure the blade was central, adjusted accordingly.
Stand back, gingerly pressed the start button for the inaugural start up, there was a bit of a clang but the machine ran very smoothly. I turned it off and then back on again, again another clang as I started it but very quiet afterwards, hmm, turned it off, unplugged it and checked everything again, turned the wheel slowly looking at the gaps with my torch, set up perfect. Right back in the house on with a Record power video and relax, it makes that sound on start up, the one in the RP video and a customers, exactly the same.
If I still drank I’d be having a very cool beer now.

So it’s onto the lathe now.




Are you free this afternoon:???: Any one, hello.
 
I get a lot of my blanks (and other timber 'bits' from my golf course, they are often trimming or cutting down various trees, I just season them at home until ready to use.
 

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