Wood turning - Anyone doing it as a hobby?

#4
Lay your hands on a bandsaw , a decent chainsaw, and a decent whetstone, it gets a bit expensive otherwise.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#6
Lay your hands on a bandsaw , a decent chainsaw, and a decent whetstone, it gets a bit expensive otherwise.
A bandsaw is on my wish list. I have a power sharpening wheel/grinder that I use for carving tools and chisels.
 
#7
Ordinary wheels like the ones fitted to a Clarke grinder will bollocks your tools in no time, get a whetstone type and make a sharpening jig, plenty of plans on youtube.
 
#8
My nieces husband does it semi professionally... he's builds bespoke kitchens as a trade, very good, expensive kitchens that is, anyway, he is always on the lookout for wind blown down wood , which he soaks and leaves under a tarp at the back of his workshop for years, the mould gets into the grain of the wood and he has turned some absolutely stunning bowls etc
 
#10
no mate , uses an electric powered lathe......... unless that was directed at me , then abolutely, but remember , it's only a bodge if it doesn't work, if it does it's a running repair
 
#11
I've taken delivery of this: https://www.machinemart.co.uk/shop/product/details/cl-cwl1000-lathe

Is there anyone into woodturning and can suggest what else I need or should get. I want to do bowls, Christmas decorations and wooden toys.

I've spent ages on YouTube looking at videos, but any hints or tips are welcome.
If it's something you are looking at getting a bit serious with I'd probably suggest starting to put a bit of money aside to buy a more capable lathe when you exceed the capacity of the Clarke which won't take long if you want to turn larger pieces and bowls.

Decent quality chisels are always worth having, I tend to buy second hand English chisels, Sorby, Marples etc. Next would be a decent chuck system, the Clarke uses 3/4" x 16tpi which is a fairly standard size so anything you buy now could be transferred to a more capable lathe with a bit of planning. Decent sharpening systems don't have to cost the earth and will pay for themselves quickly.

The Axminster lathes are Chinese but run really well and they do a good selection of decent tools and chucks.

http://www.axminster.co.uk/woodturning-crafts
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#12
"Wood turning - Anyone doing it as a hobby ?"

As opposed to a lifestyle choice ?
 
#13
Have a look here:

http://www.sawmillcreek.org/forumdisplay.php?20-Turner-s-Forum

Plenty of advice there. FWIW, I think you will outgrow/get hacked off with that lathe quite quickly. However, it's not the lathe so much as all the other stuff that you need to invest in. You need a bunch of lathe chisels. Big-ass, long-handled chunky ones. Preferably made of decent tool steel, not Chinese 20-quid-a-set ones. You will quickly dull the edge if you go with the junk. A decent grinder and wheels, as suggested above. A water bath to cool the chisels. A decent set of sharpening stones. Lots of sandpaper. You'll need chucks and centers. Calipers are also handy to measure spindle width.

When you upgrade the lathe, get a cast iron one with variable speed, reverse, and as much HP as you can afford. Reverse is very handy for sanding. No-one ever said "I wish my lathe had less mass and a less powerful motor". You want to build a massive bench for the lathe; use sandbags, iron weights, whatever you can find, to add mass to it. Vibration is your enemy. At least at the lathe ;)

You could also find a used iron lathe from the 1940s through the 1970s. Change the bearings and you are good to go. Mine's one of these:



A 1948 Delta 1460. It cost less than your Clarke, and came with about 40 chisels and a host of accessories. It weighs about 350lbs. Not saying you can't turn with the Clarke, but I think you'll find the limitations of a steel lathe quite quickly.

For learning, you could do worse than these two things:

1. Get a book on turning from the library. Ideally an old one. The art is not new!
2. Take a night school class, if you can find one.

Good luck.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#14
Has the missus been saying she wants wood ?
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#15
"Wood turning - Anyone doing it as a hobby ?"

As opposed to a lifestyle choice ?
As opposed to it being as a profession. You don't come across as very bright. A 15 Watt bulb in a lighthouse sort of chap aren't you?
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
#16
Thanks @socialdespatch and @Roadster280 - I didn't want to invest to heavily until I'd at least figured out if I enjoyed wood turning and was any good at it. But some sensible advice there which I will heed - especially the chisels. They don't feel very substantial.
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#17
As opposed to it being as a profession. You don't come across as very bright. A 15 Watt bulb in a lighthouse sort of chap aren't you?
What makes you think I'm a 'chap' ?
Stop being so abusive to me !
 
#18
This is one of those hobbies that makes me think it sounds like it could be fun but then my sensible head says "What the feck are you going to do with it?"

and I have no answer to that.

What can I do with a selection of table legs, wood bowls and such like tat except go to a boot sale and look forlorn and hopeful at the passing punters.

Think I'll save my money and buy any wooden bowls I may suddenly have a need for :)
 

Cutaway

LE
Kit Reviewer
#20
What can I do with a selection of table legs, wood bowls and such like tat except go to a boot sale and look forlorn and hopeful at the passing punters.
If you're feeling bulletproof you could always take one for a walk around Hackney.
 

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