Wood Turning and Other Wood Crafts

Danger Paws

Clanker
That bowl for the wool is a grand idea that i am going to copy. Bought a lathe a while back and that looks achievable for my current lathe skills.

Here is picture of my new workbench, finished yesterday. It's big, flat and heavy unlike the one it has replaced.
 

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Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer

Grownup_Rafbrat

ADC
Kit Reviewer
Book Reviewer
Reviews Editor
Brilliant. Thanks
I'm in the middle making one for the boss if it turns out OK I'll make another which you are welcome to
Brilliant. Thanks. I can benefit from what you learn making the first one!
 
That bowl for the wool is a grand idea that i am going to copy. Bought a lathe a while back and that looks achievable for my current lathe skills.

Here is picture of my new workbench, finished yesterday. It's big, flat and heavy unlike the one it has replaced.
Crikey, that is impressive.
Well done troop.
Makes my shed look prehistoric.
 

Themanwho

LE
Book Reviewer
That bowl for the wool is a grand idea that i am going to copy. Bought a lathe a while back and that looks achievable for my current lathe skills.

Here is picture of my new workbench, finished yesterday. It's big, flat and heavy unlike the one it has replaced.
That's not a bench, it's a beached aircraft carrier. What are you planning to work on, life size carvings of a Triceratops fighting a Challenger 2?
 
Semi-hypothetical questions for you all.

Around us they're in the process of doing a lot of forest management felling, and it's done such that I could get a part of one of the trunks from the local guy who processes and stores them. I've got a half-formed idea of making a basic live edge wood coffee table from a perpendicular cut of the trunk (i.e. cut from ground up the trunk). I've done a bit of woodwork before, but I have relatively little kit or experience, so I want to assess the feasibility - the obvious answer is ask the local carpenter, but I'd like to see if I could do it myself. So my questions are:
  • Most of the appropriate size are scots pine - is it worth doing this with a softwood / pine (given issues with resin etc)? Most of the examples I've seen are hardwood.
  • The cut will be from a trunk that is at the moment straight from being cut and resting in a yard, so I've got no real way of establishing grade and will just get what it is. They can do the initial cut. Is this a recipe for just getting a crappy piece of wood?
  • The idea is to take a whole cut (~6-foot by the full diameter of the trunk, ~2 foot), done by the yard, and make the main surface of the table from that cut. Is this going to last, or is there a high chance it will split?
  • Without a decent set of machinery or kit, is levelling the table going to be unachievable? Underside doesn't matter (I'm imagining simple blocks cut in for legs, and only about a foot off the ground), but obviously an even and flat top is the point.
  • How long would the trunk need to rest after cutting? The oldest ones are now a year old stacked outside.
My mental image is of some basic joins that even I can manage to make 2-3 block legs, which are fundamentally just physics and gravity rather than engineering, and then a lot of sanding and finishing. However, I'm aware that there are a lot of variables I'm not experienced in, so just trying to get a feel for how feasible this is.
Sounds like my dining table… The top is made from a through-and-through slice of pippy oak; the original slice was about 2’ wide, 12’ long, 2” thick, cut and joined to get the width. The legs were made with assistance from a table saw and thicknesser, the top was finished with a belt sander, planes and scrapers. There are cross grain strips on the end grain to discourage splitting though some very fine cracks have appeared (over 18 years), however, being pippy oak, there are many pin knots so the odd crack is just more ‘character’. Edges have the bark peeled off and sanded smooth, but retaining the waney edge.
pictures later.
 

Sarastro

LE
Kit Reviewer
Thanks for the replies all. The picture I'm getting is that pine is a risk for this kind of single-slab piece. I don't mind some cracks and character, but I don't want to risk the whole thing splitting or warping. I've also done some simple pine pieces before (from wood around here) which do bleed sap over the years, so I'm wary of that as well.

I was planning on self-planing and then sanding which I understand is a noorze, but I'm content to do it for a single piece. As it is, I think I'll wait until a different type of wood is available.
 

Danger Paws

Clanker
The wood was very cheap but very big. Something to do with a pallet for one of the car manufacturers (BMW markings dated 2019). I put it through the planer until it was flat and square, didn't see any point in making it smaller just for the sake of it.
140kg ish.. without the vices.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
Just a quick trip back in time. Many on here will remember those good old days before games went "Bleep", before screens, charging cables and buttons to press. Back when a favourite game from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries was Bagatelle.

I've used my newly learned skill of Steam Bending to produce this, my recreation of those old Bagatelle games. It's about 80cm in length and played with 12mm steel ball bearings. Each hole has a brass base except for one - the bonus point hole which contains a polished Portcullis one Penny coin - the same type as is used on nearly all my projects as a form of a Touch Mark. You may be able to guess why I use such a marker...

Does this bring back any memories of youth?
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skeetstar

War Hero
That bowl for the wool is a grand idea that i am going to copy. Bought a lathe a while back and that looks achievable for my current lathe skills.

Here is picture of my new workbench, finished yesterday. It's big, flat and heavy unlike the one it has replaced.
Is that a 'fitted for, but not with' No5?
Lovely bench, and some lovely tools, is it a hobby or are you a Tradesman?
 

Helm

MIA
Moderator
Book Reviewer
Just a quick trip back in time. Many on here will remember those good old days before games went "Bleep", before screens, charging cables and buttons to press. Back when a favourite game from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries was Bagatelle.

I've used my newly learned skill of Steam Bending to produce this, my recreation of those old Bagatelle games. It's about 80cm in length and played with 12mm steel ball bearings. Each hole has a brass base except for one - the bonus point hole which contains a polished Portcullis one Penny coin - the same type as is used on nearly all my projects as a form of a Touch Mark. You may be able to guess why I use such a marker...

Does this bring back any memories of youth?
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Lovely work, we had one when I was a kid.
 

Danger Paws

Clanker
Is that a 'fitted for, but not with' No5?
Lovely bench, and some lovely tools, is it a hobby or are you a Tradesman?
It's a 'rescue' No. 6 waiting for a few bit so it can become a dedicated plane for the shooting board. Started as a hobby now it's my job, i hesitate to call myself a Tradesman as i am not trade tested or certified. I make custom furniture, wooden kayaks and repair musical instruments.
 

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It's a 'rescue' No. 6 waiting for a few bit so it can become a dedicated plane for the shooting board. Started as a hobby now it's my job, i hesitate to call myself a Tradesman as i am not trade tested or certified. I make custom furniture, wooden kayaks and repair musical instruments.
That is a thing of beauty whether you are a Tradesman or not.
 

Legs

ADC
Book Reviewer
It's a 'rescue' No. 6 waiting for a few bit so it can become a dedicated plane for the shooting board. Started as a hobby now it's my job, i hesitate to call myself a Tradesman as i am not trade tested or certified. I make custom furniture, wooden kayaks and repair musical instruments.

So you're a craftsman, as is evident by the level of skill demonstrated.
 

skeetstar

War Hero
Legs I agree, craftsman us the right word.
Danger pass, well done on monetising your hobby.. gotta be the best thing ever, and I love that kayak, far better than a modern fibreglass, foam filled version.
 

olafthered

LE
Book Reviewer
Legs I agree, craftsman us the right word.
Danger pass, well done on monetising your hobby.. gotta be the best thing ever, and I love that kayak, far better than a modern fibreglass, foam filled version.
Not many fibreglass about these days, plastic for river running, and rodeo, carbon/kevlar for most else!
 
Just a quick trip back in time. Many on here will remember those good old days before games went "Bleep", before screens, charging cables and buttons to press. Back when a favourite game from the late 19th and early 20th Centuries was Bagatelle.

I've used my newly learned skill of Steam Bending to produce this, my recreation of those old Bagatelle games. It's about 80cm in length and played with 12mm steel ball bearings. Each hole has a brass base except for one - the bonus point hole which contains a polished Portcullis one Penny coin - the same type as is used on nearly all my projects as a form of a Touch Mark. You may be able to guess why I use such a marker...

Does this bring back any memories of youth?
View attachment 672312
View attachment 672313
View attachment 672315
Excellent!
Lots of fun - I liked the vertical slot machine ones that zoomed round & round & round, like pachinko machines.
I'd forgotten pennies don't have the portcullis!
(I'd also be a git and have different size / weight ball bearings ;).)

Shove ha'penny board? Might sell a load of them & this at CAMRA etc festivals. Even a doublesided ha'penny/bagatelle board! Own carry case..

Having said that - if someone mentions monetising something I've done, the first thing is 'Fark off! I did it for fun & learning!'.
Good work, as per usual!
 
Oooh! Another devious twist, annoying divots and sanded? depressions. Crazy golf for ball bearings :).
I'm off to look at the stuff they make frets from; I need to move on from using solid-core cable as a substitute (mainly for p1ss-poor jointing)!.
 

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