Women...

#1


A woman who dug up a suspected bomb in her garden washed it in her sink before police were called and a controlled explosion was carried out.

Carole Longhorn struck the metal object with her spade while gardening at her home in Melton Constable, Norfolk.
Her husband, Clive, said: "I heard a rattle in the kitchen and saw she was washing it in the blooming sink."


The object, which is about 25cm long (10in) and thought to have been a World War II projectile, was blown up.
Mrs Longhorn, 66, said she shouted out to her husband, who was indoors, after digging up the explosive.


"I called my husband to come and have a look at it, but he wouldn't so I brought it indoors," she said.
Mr Longhorn, 60, said his wife put the object on the coffee table.

"You can imagine what I said to her," he said.
Mrs Longhorn washed the bomb in the sink before taking it outside.
"She took a few precautions," Mr Longhorn said. "She put a plastic seat on the top in case it went off."

Mr Longhorn, who said the object was "heavy", then called 999 and a police officer advised they leave the house for a few hours as a precaution.



Clive and Carole Longhorn called the police after trying to clean the explosive


They returned just as a bomb disposal squad from RAF Wittering in Cambridgeshire arrived at their house on Wednesday.
"They said it was live and that we were very lucky," Mr Longhorn said.
The object was driven to a nearby quarry and detonated.
"It was brilliant," Mr Longhorn said. "The ground shook - you could feel the shockwaves come across and bump into you.
"The bloke said to me: 'Tell the wife if she finds any more, put them in a nice neat heap and we'll deal with them all at once'."


A spokesman at RAF Wittering said the 4.5in (11cm) diameter projectile "more than likely" dated back to World War II.
"We couldn't be sure it wasn't live so took the precaution and detonated it," the spokesman said.
He added that people who find an item they are unsure of should "leave it alone and dial 999".

BBC News - Woman washed suspected bomb in kitchen sink


Speechless...
 
#12
A spokesman at RAF Wittering said the 4.5in (11cm) diameter projectile "more than likely" dated back to World War II.

First glance 90% sure its solid shot, not 100% without seeing the base.

"We couldn't be sure it wasn't live so took the precaution and detonated it," the spokesman said.

If solid shot, that would have worked wonders.

"The bloke said to me: 'Tell the wife if she finds any more, put them in a nice neat heap and we'll deal with them all at once'."

Really!! So advocating the moving of blind munitions. Great, well done RAF :frustrated:
 
#13
Really!! So advocating the moving of blind munitions. Great, well done RAF
Yes, quite, how dare they give the same advice as the French and Belgian EOD teams working with the legacy of WWI!

er......been to one of the ex-ranges in North Wales where they used stacks of shells to shore-up the banks of the local river?
 
#18
Bah. You pipped me to it. Very public spirited of her to wash it. I heard dirty bombs are much worse than normal ones.

Stinker - I don't think he was serious about leaving any more she finds in a pile to get sorted later.
Not serious but quoted as saying;

"The bloke said to me: 'Tell the wife if she finds any more, put them in a nice neat heap and we'll deal with them all at once."

Why would the husband make up what the RAF said?

Not having a scooby about the DS solution but...

I'd be more concerned had it turned out to be a WW1 gas shell.
TBH they're mainly found in Belgium and France, there is the trial range at Porton Down though. Not many found in the UK these days.
 
#19
Not serious but quoted as saying;

"The bloke said to me: 'Tell the wife if she finds any more, put them in a nice neat heap and we'll deal with them all at once."

Why would the husband make up what the RAF said?



TBH they're mainly found in Belgium and France, there is the trial range at Porton Down though. Not many found in the UK these days.
There was a load found at some training area between Reading and Basingstoke a few years ago. I forget the name but SASR play there
 
#20
Not serious but quoted as saying;

"The bloke said to me: 'Tell the wife if she finds any more, put them in a nice neat heap and we'll deal with them all at once."

Why would the husband make up what the RAF said?



TBH they're mainly found in Belgium and France, there is the trial range at Porton Down though. Not many found in the UK these days.
He wasn't making up the quote from the crabs. I believe it's called 'tongue-in-cheekhumour'.


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