WOMEN RECRUITS IN THE BDE OF GURKHAS

#2
Outstanding said:
what about female recruits - will it ever happen?
For Corps other than the Infantry it should be possible - why not?

Culturally I think it very unlikely although I don't know if the RNA recruit women so I may be wrong there.

If HQ Brigade of Gurkhas have anything to do with it - not in this millenium.
 
#3
I was a patient in BMH Catterick in the late 1960s, there was a QARANC student nurse from Nepal, name was Rai.
 
#5
I new a Cpl D**** Rai QARANC, mid 80s in BMH Hong Kong although I doubt the Catterick Rai & this one are the same.
 
#6
Yes 250 may well have a woman joining their ranks in the coming weeks, but this thread is about females being actively recruited into the Brigade of Gurkhas from Nepal not about UKTAP joining a Sqn. I also know that their is a daughter of a Gurkha soldier currently undergoing basic training as a British Overseas Passport holder. But this is not recruiting females into the Gurkhas. I agree with Xenophone on this but for different reasons. For non infantry units this should not be an issue. However as a wealth of potential recruits exist already there really isn't a reason why women need to be actively recruited. If they outperformed the men on recruit selection they should be given the chance but the standard should not be lowered.
 
#7
I don't know but it may be a cultural thing, so that if women were recruited into the Gurkha engineers etc., then there may be lack of respect or discrimination from the male soldiers.
However I don't know much about the Nepalese culture so this could be way off
RustyH
 
#11
The earliest woman in 250 I can think of was in 1994-5, so it is not new at all to have women serving alongside Gurkhas in Gurkha units. I think the most I can think of at any one time is three. I am sure there were a few in Hong Kong in the early '90s too.

The QOGLR has had a female Troop OC also in around 2002.

There are Nepali women (read Gurkha daughters) and Nepali men (read Gurkha sons) in the British Army serving as British soldiers as in not Gurkha units or under Gurkha Terms of Service.

CMS and the Gurkha basic training are different. All Gurkhas are trained as Infantry men first (ie they could all be sent to an Infantry Battalion), then the Corps' Gurkhas are sent to complete their special to arm training.
 
#12
chocolate_frog said:
The earliest woman in 250 I can think of was in 1994-5, so it is not new at all to have women serving alongside Gurkhas in Gurkha units. I think the most I can think of at any one time is three. I am sure there were a few in Hong Kong in the early '90s too.

The QOGLR has had a female Troop OC also in around 2002.

There are Nepali women (read Gurkha daughters) and Nepali men (read Gurkha sons) in the British Army serving as British soldiers as in not Gurkha units or under Gurkha Terms of Service.

CMS and the Gurkha basic training are different. All Gurkhas are trained as Infantry men first (ie they could all be sent to an Infantry Battalion), then the Corps' Gurkhas are sent to complete their special to arm training.
I had four females serve with me during my time with 250 1997-2000
 
#13
All females in the Bde of Gurkhas have been of the British Officer variety and to my knowledge only with the Corps units (QGE, QGS and QOGLR). The Bde of Gurkhas does at present recruit female Nepalis as there is no requirement to do so. With GURTAM liability capped at around the 3300 mark, the Bde selects the best recruits agasist a selection process far more demanding (physicaly and mentally) that that attended by UK/Commonwealth recruits. Females in general are disadvantaged physically by gender. British Officers serivng with the Bde of Gurkhas do not undertake the same selection as Gurkhas. If they did, there would be very few British Officer, male or female.
 
#15
Regimental pride is a wonderful thing though tends to skew objectivity and cloud reality. This thread originally asked the question "What about female recruits (in the Gurkhas) - will it ever happen? Seems the short answer is no though certain respondants have reduced the whole thing to a racial superiority issue.

Dherai Gurkha aimai sipahi chhainan.
 
#16
Busterdog.

I belive that your suggestion of "racial superiority issues" is way off mark. I don't know how much you know about the selection of potential Gurkha recruits in Nepal, but there are 1000'ds of applicants chasing approx 200-250 places in the British Army per year. The selection process is deliberately hard to ensure that the quality line of potential Gurkha recruits is consistent year after year. The ratio of applicants per BG post is therefore much higher that of UKTAP manned Regiments. The Gurkha recruit pass out rate at ITC Catterick (where they undertake Phase 1 training) is a consistent 99% and is only achived as a direct result of the demanding pre-selection process in Nepal.
 
#17
Log. I'm familiar with the British Gurkha selection process and am well aware of why 15 years service in the British Army is so attractive it induces the best of a certain caste of Nepali youth to apply. Money! I reiterate what I posted earlier. If young Brits were presented with the opportunity to earn 800% more than the average civilian wage and then retire after fifteen years with a pension of 400% more than the average civilian wage the army would be inundated with the brightest and fittest youngsters in the nation who, in order to ensure selection, would be well prepared to pass physical tests similar to Gurkha selection. With all that money at stake they'd probably be tested on navigation too!

Your defence of Gurkhas is admirable your almost contemptuous dismissal of British soldiers, particularly young officers, offensive. It's not quite clear if you have commanded both Gurkha and British soldiers (particularly infantrymen) in order to be able to give a dispassionate comparison. Have you?
 
#18
itsneverdullinhull said:
Thier is going to be a female joing 250 gurkah signals in the coming weeks
Why do they need a woman in 250...are they struggling to find a right hand marker??? :p
 
#19
Busterdog.

I agreed that money is an incentive, but cetainly not the only incentive and to answer your question, yes I have commanded both Brits and Gurkhas and have also worked alongside (but not commanded) infanteers - Gurkhas and Brits. I belive that you have misinterpreted my comments about British soldiers. Brits, Commonwealth and Gurkha soldeirs all have their stenghts and weaknesses as a result of their different backgrounds and the values of their societies, however anyone who has been or is a soldier (regardelss of nationality) has my respect until their actions determine otherwise.

Gurkha wages are all relative, in a similar context to those of a professional sportsman - earnings are age limited. A serving Gurkha earns a lot of money in relation to the average wage in Nepal (one of the world's poorest countries) - BUT - a Gurkha having served 15 year in the British Army returns to Nepal in his early 30s. Once in Nepal, unless he becomes self-employed, is employed by a western organisation or by other ex-servicemen, the chance of either him or his immediate family obtaining worthwhile employment is slim. In my experience the reasons for this are that many Nepali civillians discriminate agaisnt retired Gurkhas, as they are either too qualified for a post, are seen be some employers as a threat to the hierarchy of the company (as they are generally more experienced and wordly wise) and also within Nepals fatalist society, an ex-serviceman has already has his share of luck.

There is no such thing as a public welfare system in Nepal and with the active Maoist insurgency over that past decade, all Gurkhas (serving and retired) regulary get approached for 'contributions'. In particular, Gurkhas from the RGR Bns are worse off as few have transferrable skills and those who have returned to the UK on ILR terms after discharge are finding themseleves no better off due to the cost of living.
 
#20
Xenophon said:
Outstanding said:
what about female recruits - will it ever happen?
Culturally I think it very unlikely although I don't know if the RNA recruit women so I may be wrong there.
After doing a six month stint in Nepal, apparently the RNA do have serving women, an RNA Para officer told me they have softer hands and are therefore used to pack parachutes, despite our muffled laughter he was being genuine!

I've no idea whether his opinion of 'serving' was the same as ours though.

I'll agree culturally it's not very likely, the only Nepali females not chained to the sink in the evenings in Kathmandu were prossies or had lived in Europe or America so were very westernised.
 

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