WMF says Criminals should apologise to victims

#1
here
The Times said:
Criminals should be told to apologise to victims, says Cherie
Ruth Gledhill and Richard Ford

Cherie Booth will call today for a huge expansion of face-to-face justice, in which offenders meet their victims and apologise for their crimes.

The wife of the Prime Minister will give warning that sending people to jail does not alter their long-term attitudes and behaviour.

The jail system is facing an overcrowding crisis and courts in England and Wales are being put on standby to hold prisoners in cells overnight.

A set of emergency measures has been drawn up by the Home Office as the number of prisoners being sent to jail continues to rise. On Monday night 270 prisoners were held in police cells because there were not spaces in jails in those parts of the country.

The police will only provide 400 cells for the prison service.

The intervention of Ms Booth in the law-and-order debate is based on the ten years that she has spent sitting in courts as a recorder when she has had to sentence offenders.

She will say in the Radio 4 programme Lent Talk tonight that “restorative justice”, in which offenders meet their victims, should be used routinely for assault, robbery and stealing and where appropriate for domestic violence and sexual assault.

Ms Booth said that when she sentenced an offender she often wondered whether the person felt any remorse for the crime or the effect that it had on the victim.

“This impression has been reinforced when I have visited prisons and spoken to inmates. It seems that neither the court process nor the prison experience is helping them confront their behaviour or its consequences.

“It is clear that simply locking people up does not itself alter their long-term behaviour. In too many cases, it simply shelves the problem.”

The Home Office is piloting a series of restorative justice schemes in the community and in prisons.

Ms Booth insisted that these programmes did not “soft-pedal on sin” but focused on how offenders could make a fresh start in life.

Ms Booth’s support for face-to-face justice will be welcomed by penal reformers who have pressed for it to be adopted as an alternative to sending people to prison.

Officials have made contingency plans with the Department for Constitutional Affairs for prisoners to be held in cells under Crown courts in Central London, Manchester and Birmingham.

Prison governors and officers have been told that they face being drafted into the courts to look after offenders overnight.

The prisons crisis comes just seven weeks after John Reid, the Home Secretary, faced a similar emergency in which court cells had to be used. He brought the problems to the attention of the most senior judges in England and Wales.

The meeting prompted the Lord Chief Justice, Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers, to issue a statement reminding judges to use prison only as a last resort.

The numbers fell, but not by the amount that prison officials had expected, and in recent weeks they have risen steadily.

A Prison Service spokes-woman confirmed that the use of court cells is being planned as a contingency measure in order to ensure prisoner welfare and public safety should prison and police Safeguard accommodation be exhausted.

Court cells were last used in January, a move that angered Lord Falconer of Thoroton, QC, the Secretary of State for Constitutional Affairs, who has overall responsibility for the courts service.

Last night a statement from the Department for Constitutional Affairs said: “Use of court cells to hold prisoners overnight is only considered as a last resort. If a request to use court cells is made, it is granted only on the condition that the cells will not be used to keep a person at risk of self harm and that it is for the night only.”

Tough talk

What Tony Blair has had to say on sentencing:

“The courts should be tough on these people [who breach ASBOs] . . . For the majority of people who breach ASBOs, they are actually going inside”

“In the 1960s revolution . . . law and order policy still focused on the offender’s rights, protecting the innocent, understanding the social causes of their criminality. Today, people have had enough of this part of the 1960s consensus”

“Laws have made a difference, but they have not been clear or tough enough. We need to use the law to send strong signals.”

“The blunt reality is that, at least in the short and medium term, the measures proposed will mean an increase in prison places”
...so offenders who commit crimes of assault, robbery and stealing and where appropriate for domestic violence and sexual assault should meet their victims and apologise ... but non TV licence payers and those who withhold some of their Council Tax payment (for services not provided) will be sent down ...
 
#2
I really don't think that Cherie Bliar is the one to call for anything face-to-face.
 
#4
Obviously the WMF didn't see the programs for the reconciliation that were screened in NI about paramilitary killers coming face to face with their victims families. The one with Michael Stone was particularly harrowing. It didn't do anything except upset the duaghter of the victim and Stone didn't come close to apologising, just tried to justify the killing.

When will these do-gooders stop poking their beaks in and accept that to make people change their ways they need to experience hardship and unpleasantness. If this means putting people in prison and making them do hard labour, in unpleasant conditions, it will encourage them not to come back.

The government is on a Green kick at the moment. Imagine how much power you could generate if you stuck the prison population on treadmills, linked to generators. Get them working on chain gangs, fixing roads. Give them the unpleasant jobs and make them work for their freedom. Make them put something back into society, instead of being a burdon on it. Lets stop all this social care for criminals. Stop giving them drugs in prison to perpetuate their habit. They are NOT the victims of society, they prey on it and it has to stop.

If these suggestions were put into practice, I am sure that we would not see the prison overcrowding we have today.

Ish.
 
#5
I'm with you ishinru, soft justice is no justice...

Prison is no deterrent when you get half off for not stabbing someone else while you're in there. Truth in sentencing works. I don't care too much for rehabilitation. If they're going to rehabilitate they can still do it after their full term. For the bulk that don't at least truth in sentencing would give us a five to ten year break from their continued criminal behaviour..
 
#6
Oh sorry

Sorry is what you are when you forget someones birthday
sorry is what you are when you borrow someones car and bend it

If you were "sorry" you would not have done it if you had the choice

sorry my arse. the only good thing about it is you could get a good ID on them in preparation for a nightime meeting with billy the bat
 
#7
They wouldn't mean it anyway, 99% of criminals rerally don't give a toss about their victims. Though a face to face meeting might be a chance to wring the fcukers neck, apologise back to him (meaning it as much as he/she does) and everyones happy.
 
#8
I'm sorry but she should just concentrate on being ugly.

And I didn't mean my apology either.
 
#13
ishinryu said:
Obviously the WMF didn't see the programs for the reconciliation that were screened in NI about paramilitary killers coming face to face with their victims families. The one with Michael Stone was particularly harrowing. It didn't do anything except upset the duaghter of the victim and Stone didn't come close to apologising, just tried to justify the killing.

When will these do-gooders stop poking their beaks in and accept that to make people change their ways they need to experience hardship and unpleasantness. If this means putting people in prison and making them do hard labour, in unpleasant conditions, it will encourage them not to come back.

The government is on a Green kick at the moment. Imagine how much power you could generate if you stuck the prison population on treadmills, linked to generators. Get them working on chain gangs, fixing roads. Give them the unpleasant jobs and make them work for their freedom. Make them put something back into society, instead of being a burdon on it. Lets stop all this social care for criminals. Stop giving them drugs in prison to perpetuate their habit. They are NOT the victims of society, they prey on it and it has to stop.

If these suggestions were put into practice, I am sure that we would not see the prison overcrowding we have today.

Ish.
I agree with you on this re:BBC program. This was an attempt fronted by Desmond Tutu to replay the "Truth and Reconciliation Commission" from S Africa in an Irish context and it simply didn't work because there hadn't been a massive change in government and style of government meaning that it was a necessity.
 
#14
So after some little old lady has been beaten up and mugged by some scrote, in the million to one chance some copper actually catches said scrote and scrote is convicted, then she must come face to face with him again?

With a huge number of cases being lost through witness intimidation, this is a great idea. I wonder what percentage of conversations will go along the lines of the scrote threatening the victim?
 
#15
Dread said:
So after some little old lady has been beaten up and mugged by some scrote, in the million to one chance some copper actually catches said scrote and scrote is convicted, then she must come face to face with him again?

With a huge number of cases being lost through witness intimidation, this is a great idea. I wonder what percentage of conversations will go along the lines of the scrote threatening the victim?
The reality is that in the cases where it has been tried, and the victim has to agree, there have been positive results. It has far more to do with one giving closure to the victim to use that over worked term and trying to reduce re-offending. I certainly don't think it should be used as an alternative to punishment rather part of a process of attempting rehabilitation. Cutting recidivision would be one of the biggest crime prevention measures we could achieve.
 
#16
maxi_77 said:
Dread said:
So after some little old lady has been beaten up and mugged by some scrote, in the million to one chance some copper actually catches said scrote and scrote is convicted, then she must come face to face with him again?

With a huge number of cases being lost through witness intimidation, this is a great idea. I wonder what percentage of conversations will go along the lines of the scrote threatening the victim?
The reality is that in the cases where it has been tried, and the victim has to agree, there have been positive results. It has far more to do with one giving closure to the victim to use that over worked term and trying to reduce re-offending. I certainly don't think it should be used as an alternative to punishment rather part of a process of attempting rehabilitation. Cutting recidivision would be one of the biggest crime prevention measures we could achieve.
... especially if the cutting was performed betwixt head and shoulders!
 
#17
The Blair Witch said:
sending people to jail does not alter their long-term attitudes and behaviour. ....... It is clear that simply locking people up does not itself alter their long-term behaviour. In too many cases, it simply shelves the problem
For once, I agree with her. By the time they get to prison, most crims will have been through the whole range of non-custodial sentences. If ASBOS, fines, probation and community service haven't worked it's unlikely that prison will rehabilitate them.

The only successful approach to the type of crime we have in the UK is the one adopted by the Americans. Very long sentences and whole life terms for persistent offenders.

The Times said:
The jail system is facing an overcrowding crisis
That's not because we are jailing too many people. It's because we don't have enough prisons and gov.uk is too skint to build more.

The Wide Mouthed Frog said:
“restorative justice”, in which offenders meet their victims, should be used routinely for assault, robbery and stealing and where appropriate for domestic violence and sexual assault.
I wonder if she'd have such an enlightened view if she was robbed or if her daughter was sexually assaulted. I'd also like to know whether she is proposing that people who commit racially aggravated assault should no longer face an automatic prison sentence.

The Prison Service said:
the use of court cells is being planned
Within the next few months we are simply going to run out of space. What's going to happen then? I can see the Home Office simply opening the doors and letting crims out before they've served their time.
 
#18
So, let me get this right....
She wants someone who doesn't give a sh1t to pretend he gives a sh1t??!!
Easy really, she has robbed character trait from her self serving husband!
:pissedoff:
 

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