Witch hunt!

I smoked for seven years starting when I was 18 and stopping when I reached 25.

Now in my mid sixties, most of the smokers I‘ve known all my life have COPD in various stages. Some of them are scarily ill with it and several have died because of it.

I’ve got plenty of vices, particularly drinking beer and cider, but I don’t have to make any particular effort to breathe air as I go through life on a day to day basis.

Having observed COPD in so many of my mates, I can say packing up after a relatively short period of smoking was a great decision.

A particular milestone for me was when they banned smoking in public places like pubs etc.

I spent many a time watching clouds of smoke drifting around the premises I‘ve sat in trying to avoid it as it comes wafting my way, sometimes having to inhale it because I can’t avoid it.

I love it now when a smoker complains that they have to go outside for their nicotine fix. Why should I be forced to risk COPD because they don’t care about their lungs?!
 

Cavuman

Clanker
I am terminally ill with end-stage COPD and am on cannulated oxygen 24/7/365. I suffer paroxysmal dyspnea when I can't catch a breath and am on a cornucopia of meds and inhalants. I am in and out of hospital; I hate to see the expression on my wife's face every time I'm loaded in the back of the ambulance.

It's a helluva price to pay, but I have no one to blame but myself - 47 years of Marlboro Reds a/k/a "Cowboy Killers". God knows I loved 'em just as He knows how deeply addicted to nicotine I became. It took a very close brush with death four years ago for me to finally quit.

My Pulmonologist told me that of his four hundred patients, I have the second-worst pair of lungs he currently treats. Back in 2017 I asked him how long I had to live. He said a year, so at least there's that! It's my favourite game: Beat the Reaper!

I am not a vociferous NO SMOKING crusader, but it breaks my heart every time I see someone light up. The habit is not only financially ruinous, it'll kill you for real. Every damn time!

Please put 'em down....

- Ed
 
Just reading in the soldier magazine that smoking is to be banned in all MOD property (Unless you live there).
It look likes the rules apply on exercise areas, that should be good to watch smokers snapping at the slightest thing.
 

DITA

MIA
Just reading in the soldier magazine that smoking is to be banned in all MOD property (Unless you live there).
It look likes the rules apply on exercise areas, that should be good to watch smokers snapping at the slightest thing.

That was the first think I thought of as I read the details too.

Should be good for a laugh.
 
I am terminally ill with end-stage COPD and am on cannulated oxygen 24/7/365. I suffer paroxysmal dyspnea when I can't catch a breath and am on a cornucopia of meds and inhalants. I am in and out of hospital; I hate to see the expression on my wife's face every time I'm loaded in the back of the ambulance.

It's a helluva price to pay, but I have no one to blame but myself - 47 years of Marlboro Reds a/k/a "Cowboy Killers". God knows I loved 'em just as He knows how deeply addicted to nicotine I became. It took a very close brush with death four years ago for me to finally quit.

My Pulmonologist told me that of his four hundred patients, I have the second-worst pair of lungs he currently treats. Back in 2017 I asked him how long I had to live. He said a year, so at least there's that! It's my favourite game: Beat the Reaper!

I am not a vociferous NO SMOKING crusader, but it breaks my heart every time I see someone light up. The habit is not only financially ruinous, it'll kill you for real. Every damn time!

Please put 'em down....

- Ed
Thanks for sharing your painful journey with us, and keep fighting the good fight!

A former colleague of mine was diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer a few years ago, had a lung excision and then 18 months of pretty harrowing treatment. He never smoked and feels obliged to qualify explaining his lung cancer with "but I've never smoked" because of the typical judgemental view most people have of lung cancer victims.

More recently I have undergone treatment for skin cancer and it both amazed and disgusted me seeing patients in wheel chairs and on oxygen being wheeled by friends and relatives to remote parts of the hospital to smoke. The worst location for that is adjacent to the front entrance of the Brutalist Royal Free Hospital in Hampstead (recently described as 'a multi-story car park with the joy beaten out of it'). There are typically dozens of smokers out the front - generally underneath a No Smoking sign - puffing away in hospital gowns or PJs, and telling Joshua Mbongwe from G4S to 'fu$k off' when he suggests they don't smoke on the hospital premises. The selfishness of smokers and the contempt in which I hold them knows no bounds.
 
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RBMK

LE
Book Reviewer
Just reading in the soldier magazine that smoking is to be banned in all MOD property (Unless you live there).
It look likes the rules apply on exercise areas, that should be good to watch smokers snapping at the slightest thing.
Already has been banned in many.

I recently watched certain MOD staff walking across to the accommodation blocks to get their fix as it's still allowed in "residential" areas of the site.
 

Awol

LE
Already has been banned in many.
I recently watched certain MOD staff walking across to the accommodation blocks to get their fix as it's still allowed in "residential" areas of the site.
As a life long non-smoker (both my parents chainsmoked when I was a kid, a teenager and when I was an adult, and as a result I developed almost a phobia about cigarettes. Unlike most people my age, a cigarette has literally never touched my lips, I feel that strongly about it, so there was none of that teenage experimental stuff for me), I used to watch amazed in barracks as a smoker opposite would suddenly stir in the early hours, reach out a groping hand to the bedside cupboard, fumble around until he found the fags and his lighter, put the fag in his mouth and light it...... all without opening his eyes even once.

I bet he was the dog’s böllocks when it came to stripping his weapon in the dark.

He wasn’t alone either, probably three quarters of the block did exactly the same thing.

I could never understand why anyone would willingly take up a habit which they knew for certain was highly addictive, would ultimately cost them more than food and would probably kill them.
 
Just reading in the soldier magazine that smoking is to be banned in all MOD property (Unless you live there).
It look likes the rules apply on exercise areas, that should be good to watch smokers snapping at the slightest thing.
When I was in the US Army (87- 92) a lot of soldiers used chewing tobacco/snuff to maintain their nicotine addiction. Is that a thing in Britain?
 

Ritch

LE
When I was in the US Army (87- 92) a lot of soldiers used chewing tobacco/snuff to maintain their nicotine addiction. Is that a thing in Britain?

I'm not a smoker but I don't think chewing tobacco is that widespread at all here. Snuff went out of fashion a long, long time ago.
 

Awol

LE
When I was in the US Army (87- 92) a lot of soldiers used chewing tobacco/snuff to maintain their nicotine addiction. Is that a thing in Britain?
My parents eventually gave up in the 1990s using the nicotine patches. It probably took them six months and I am incredibly proud of them for achieving it, especially as they had been smoking like chimneys for the previous 35 years, and yet they did it, and haven’t smoked since.

In the UK the nicotine patches are available free. If that’s the case in the US, why would they continue the expense, and the risk of mouth cancer by changing to chewing tobacco?
 
When I was in the US Army (87- 92) a lot of soldiers used chewing tobacco/snuff to maintain their nicotine addiction. Is that a thing in Britain?
My parents eventually gave up in the 1990s using the nicotine patches. It probably took them six months and I am incredibly proud of them for achieving it, especially as they had been smoking like chimneys for the previous 35 years, and yet they did it, and haven’t smoked since.

In the UK the nicotine patches are available free. If that’s the case in the US, why would they continue the expense, and the risk of mouth cancer by changing to chewing tobacco?
Nicotine patches came onto the market in the 1990’s in the US. I’m just curious as to whether chewing tobacco use is widespread in Britain because it certainly is in the US.

Smokeless Tobacco Use in the United States
 
No, so rare as to be almost non-existant. Apart from time in the US, I’ve never seen anyone chewing it, ever.

Are the patches free in the US?
One of my big dislikes on ops with US forces (actually my only dislike) were the paper cups and water bottles filled with spat out, mucus covered chewing tobacco left lying about in the ops and planning shops. Disgusting.

And no, @ABNredleg I've never seen chewing tobacco consumed in the UK and long may it stay that way.
 
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Thanks for sharing your painful journey with us, and keep fighting the good fight!

A former colleague of mine was diagnosed with metastatic lung cancer a few years ago, had a lung excision and then 18 months of pretty harrowing treatment. He never smoked and feels obliged to qualify explaining his lung cancer with "but I've never smoked" because of the typical judgemental view most people have of lung cancer victims.

More recently I have undergone treatment for skin cancer and it both amazed and disgusted me seeing patients in wheel chairs and on oxygen being wheeled to remote parts of the hospital to smoke. The worst location for that is adjacent to the front entrance of the Brutalist Royal Free Hospital in Hampstead (recently described as 'a multi-story car park with the joy beaten out of it'). There are typically dozens of smokers out the front - generally underneath a No Smoking sign - puffing away in hospital gowns or PJs, and telling Joshua Mbongwe from G4S to 'fu$k off' when he suggests they don't smoke on the hospital premises. The selfishness of smokers and the contempt in which I hold them knows no bounds.
Used to astound me when I first got my job in the NHS.
Folk with stomas in lined up by the back doors jamming the fag into the hole or towing the O2 bottle along behind them to the bike shed at the front.
They've now added an irritating automated announcement informing the mortuary que that there's no smoking on NHS premises that goes off whenever anyone goes past.
 
One of my big dislikes on ops with US forces (actually my only dislike) were the paper cups and water bottles filled with spat out, mucus covered chewing tobacco left lying about in the ops and planning shops. Disgusting.

And no, I've never seen chewing tobacco consumed in the UK and long may it stay that way.
Wrigleys is bad enough.
And filthy people gobbing up sputum onto the pavements
 
Used to astound me when I first got my job in the NHS.
Folk with stomas in lined up by the back doors jamming the fag into the hole or towing the O2 bottle along behind them to the bike shed at the front.
They've now added an irritating automated announcement informing the mortuary que that there's no smoking on NHS premises that goes off whenever anyone goes past.
I was at Barts recently for a routine scan and Security was called after a patient lit up in a lift and refused to put it out. From the nearby lobby I heard some of the exchange along the lines of "I know my rights" and "Oi, that's mine and I'm sueing you for assault" after the security guard presumably removed the cigarette.
 
Fair enough. Thought it was an extinct practice.
It's useful if you are working in a hospital and have to go off site to smoke.
Also it's the burning of the tobacco that produces the harmful effects.

 
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